Content That Damion Jenkins Likes

Damion Jenkins, ADN, MSN 2,974 Views

Joined: Nov 20, '17; Posts: 49 (49% Liked) ; Likes: 103
Nurse Education Consultant, Tutor and Writer; from MD , US
Specialty: 7 year(s) of experience in Individualized Tutoring

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  • Sep 23

    Quote from Dragonnurse1
    I was in the last group of the pencil and paper testers. 2 days 4 sections and 6 weeks of waiting. So sure I failed. The results always came on a Saturday. Opened the envelope and sat crying on bed in total relief as I had passed. Those taking the test today are lucky.
    I understand the sentiment, but if you read between the lines of the article, one who does "great" on the nclex and answers the "passing level" questions correctly gets rewarded with harder questions that they aren't likely to know the answers to. This isn't unlike getting grilled by the grumpy nurse about things you haven't been taught (yet) at Clinicals. After passing the nclex you walk out feeling three inches tall. The quicker results are just like someone giving you a donut and a coffee after waterboarding you for a couple hours. Ummm...thanks?

  • Sep 23

    I was in the last group of the pencil and paper testers. 2 days 4 sections and 6 weeks of waiting. So sure I failed. The results always came on a Saturday. Opened the envelope and sat crying on bed in total relief as I had passed. Those taking the test today are lucky.

  • Sep 23

    Quote from Chrispy11
    Hello Damion! I always enjoy your posts. I just took the NCLEX back in June. What you said is true. Nerve wracking. About a third of mine was SATA. It shut off after 75. I remember my professor and prep class instructor saying everyone walks out having no idea how they did. They weren't kidding. Thankfully I passed. I was happy to put that whole experience in my rearview mirror.
    Congratulations!!

  • Sep 23

    Hello Damion! I always enjoy your posts. I just took the NCLEX back in June. What you said is true. Nerve wracking. About a third of mine was SATA. It shut off after 75. I remember my professor and prep class instructor saying everyone walks out having no idea how they did. They weren't kidding. Thankfully I passed. I was happy to put that whole experience in my rearview mirror.

  • Aug 27

    Im confused. Your very first job you were immediately charge nurse and your very first day of orientation you were given 15 total patients of your own with no preceptor?

  • Aug 27

    Quote from Damion Jenkins
    Take care and keep fighting the good fight.
    Thank you....it helps to know that this is not forever and I am not the first nurse to be in this position. I appreciate your transparency and honesty. <3

  • Aug 27

    This is more than applicable at the moment. I worked sub-acute before moving to a acute-care hospital on a medical-surgical unit. Although I have a basic understanding/foundation, I am finding the move difficult to adjust to.

    Heavier patient load with staffing minimums and upper management constantly on our tail to perform better. Meanwhile we don't have basic supplies like working vitals machines. It seems that everything I learned in nursing school sugar coated the reality and most days I feel like a well paid servant than a critical thinking health care professional.

    Although my heart is in caring for my patients and promoting the best health care outcomes for them, it can be difficult when many other pieces are not in place.

    Hoping that it gets better.

  • Aug 27

    This very timely article as I will be taking on the role of charge nurse at a dialysis unit. I start in 12 days. I'm excited and nervous.

  • Aug 27

    I'll be starting my first nursing job in dialysis too. Very happy to have secured a position. I had a few to choose from and was lucky enough to get to shadow with different potential employers so I had an idea of expectations. I think I chose the best fit.

  • Aug 27

    From a new grad having trouble trying to choose specialties during orientation... THANK YOU !! This reaffirmed what my priorities are and made me feel like it's ok not to know everything. As others have said, timely and great information.

  • Aug 27

    This is very pertinent and timely advice for struggling new grads. I very much enjoyed this article. Thank you!

  • Aug 20

    I just responded to a poster that submitted "how I stopped worrying and learned to love the monitor". It somewhat references alarm fatigue and I posted the words below. While I personally dislike joint commission on this one they did hit the mark but without any real message on how to.
    One pt stands out in memory. In for persistent V tach, she was going to see an electrophysiologist. Therefore she rang a critical value alarm continuously. But this pt had a pulse throughout her entire stay. As we were in a cardiovascular ICU with post op CABGs, post cath pts and generally sick pts, how do you safely monitor everyone else. Fortunately she had an arterial line and we were only going to treat her if she changed to pulseless vtach. So, I changed her alarm to aline to the critical value, greatly narrowed the parameters, and put vtach on message. Finally, quiet came over the unit. Everyone was told about the changes and I felt the pt was more accurately monitored for what we were going to and need to respond to.
    Imagine my disappointment when the next day I was called into managers office and told that this was inappropriate. Like we needed the constant reminder th pt had vtach with a pulse.
    Anyway my response to the other article is below. I find that a lot of people blame the monitors when they are only telling us what we asked them to.

    "I like the topic. I try to get my coworkers to love the monitor as much as I do. Alarm fatigue is a huge issue. So make the monitor work for you. Adjust alarms so they are appropriate. This might include limits or the alarm value. For example narrowing rate alarms,ie if I have a pt on cardiazem or amiodarone, raise the lower to 60 or 70 as the med might be *too effective * and lower upper to 110-120 after gaining some control so you know if med is ineffective.*
    Also know lead placement. Frequently I receive a pt who rings for asystole all day due to one lead reading that has such a low amplitude that it does look like that. Placement may have to go way off standard to get all leads to read. Remember the monitor reads all, not just the display lead. Also, pacemakers are sometimes challenging as leads may have to be moved to accommodate. You can go to your manual for the monitor to see the changes needed.*
    Review the limits, know the reasons for false alarms and how to fix them . Even frequent artifact can be and needs to be corrected. The wires themselves may be microfractured and need to be replaced.
    Sounds like you learned to always check the pt first in the case of alarm. I just want to say help the monitor work for you."

  • Aug 20

    Great comments about bullying. Yes. Workplace bullying is alive and well. But as some of you mentioned - not everything is bullying. For a behavior to be considered bullying, it must include 3 things: 1. There has to be a target (the target can be 1 person or a small group, i.e. night shift nurses, new nurses, etc.), 2. The behavior has to be harmful in some way to either target or to patients, and 3. the behavior has to be repeated. It can't just be a one-time nasty comment during a crisis situation. So, if you believe you are being bullied, compare your experience to the true definition. What I find in my experience is that there is bullying but not nearly as much as nurses being uncivil to each other!

  • Aug 20

    Kristi. Thank you for your thoughtful post about whether or not you could "be the bully" and for referencing my work!!! It takes moral courage to turn the mirror towards yourself. I wish more nurses (and other humans) did the same!

    The many comments posted reflect that human behavior is complex!! There is no simple answer. Rather than a solid - yes..you are the bully or no...you did what you should have done (or maybe didn't do enough), the bigger ah ha here is that every single one of us (me too...and I teach this!!) can in some way contribute to a less than professional work environment. Whether it's bullying, incivility, or just having a bad day, we all need to reflect and then handle situations more professionally in the future. Aren't we (shouldn't we) all on the path to continuous learning?

    I applaud you for the moral courage it took to write this piece. Kudos!
    Kindest regards
    Renee

  • Aug 20

    Interesting but somewhat concerning conversation. Although we are all entitled to our opinion, it's how we communicate our opinion that matters most. Nursing is a profession and as a profession, we are expected to conduct ourselves at the highest level of professionalism. I have not seen that here. And although I'm not one to defend my work...to be clear...for a behavior to be considered bullying, there must be a target, the behavior has to be harmful, and has to be repeated over time. This isn't about being thick or thinned skinned...this is about the evidence that shows that disruptive behaviors (bullying or incivility), impacts patients in a negative way. If any of our moms, dads, sisters, brother, etc. were patients on our units, behavior would matter.

    Respectfully,
    Renee


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