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dogmombyday, RN 1,385 Views

Joined: Aug 26, '17; Posts: 28 (54% Liked) ; Likes: 74

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  • Jun 15

    I have the somewhat unique position of being in the no-man's land between nursing school and real world nursing: I have a whopping 3 months of nursing experience under my belt. Well, 2.5, but I can round up, okay? A few months ago, I was a note-writing, clinical-attending, nclex-studying student. Now I'm a full-fledged RN, which is sort of blowing.

    As such, I had a few thoughts to share with you.

    First, like I said, don't let others bring you down. You have enough to worry about--you're learning to be healers!--without concerning yourself with the opinions of others. There will be nurses, at clinicals and maybe even some on this site, who seem to have been born nurses...and I don't mean that it was their destiny, but that they seem unable to remember going through what you are now going through, and they definitely seem unable to relate. Go to clinical and try your hardest anyway. If someone makes you feel badly for being a student, store that away and use it as motivation when you need it. Prove them wrong. That was honestly my biggest struggle in school--what if so-and-so doesn't think I can be a nurse?! So-and-so's opinion is not the be all, end all of who will be a good nurse.

    Second, don't let yourself get too wrapped up in who got what grade. I managed to pull off pretty solid grades on most of my exams, but I remember getting down because I was quietly excited about my 90% while the girl next to me was telling anyone who would listen about her 98%. Try your hardest, but realize that answering every question right is not what you study for. You study so that you can care for people, which is not something everyone gets the chance to do.

    Third, jump in at clinical. I missed out on trying out new skills because I was terrified of doing it wrong. Clinical is a time for you to get hands-on learning. Meaning, you can't learn it if you don't get hands-on. It's scary, yes, but it's also just about the safest, most protected environment to learn it in. Your instructor will appreciate the initiative you're taking, and your patient will appreciate that you're taking the time to learn how to do things the right way. Just try it. There are few feelings that match what it's like to get your first successful IV start. (I'm pretty certain I squealed and had a smile on my face for the next hour or two). And if you don't get it the first try, ask what you could've done better or where you went wrong. That's what your instructor is there for. And if your instructor isn't around when you need an answer, try asking a nurse on that floor. Some of the best tips I recieved during clinical were from people other than my instructor.

    Finally, don't set your mind too much on what speciality you'll go into after school. Otherwise, you may run the risk of painting yourself into a corner. Or, you may just be flat out wrong. I can tell you, I swore up and down I would work in pediatrics because "adults weren't for me". Guess what? I work in the ICU and have yet to see anyone under age 25 on my floor. Guess what else? I have never felt happier or more fufilled in my work. That being said, don't let anyone tell you that new nurses can't work in this or that specialty. There aren't set rules for most areas, and there are usually exceptions. My hospital just hired its first new grads in L&D and it's going swimmingly. If it's your dream, go for it. The worst that can happen is a no, and you can try again until you end up where you're supposed to be.

    Nursing school isnt for everyone, that's simply how it is. But, if it is for you, then THIS is for you.

    Sincerely,
    A shiny new nurse

  • Apr 15

    While I’m sure this is the norm at some hospitals/clinics/offices, it’s certainly not the case on my unit...but the author seems sure that this is the case everywhere, as he reduces “what nurses do” to applying cardiac leads and fumbling to place IVs yup, that’s all I do all day long. Apply and fumble, fumble and apply.

  • Mar 10

    Quote from Guy in Babyland
    Depends on the size of the unit and the length of the residency. A bigger unit with a long orientation allows you to gradually build up to the higher acuity patients.

    Agreed. I was offered a spot in the ICU at the end of my new grad fellowship but it came with a very intense 9 week orientation...and that's after 2 months of the general new grad fellowship working on different units. I know my unit (in general) ranges from 8-12 weeks for orientation for new nurses. I think as long as the unit is willing to work with you based on your individual needs, and they aren't just trying to churn out more nurses, then it's totally doable!

    Ps-I love it in my ICU, I can't imagine having gone to the floor after working there. God bless medsurg nurses but that's not where my heart is.

  • Jan 1

    Working, absolutely. I'm halfway through my first year and it is nothing like nursing school. It feels like my brain is whirring a million miles a minute most of the time. No number of lectures can make you realize the sheer amount of responsibility you have on your shoulders. That's not to say it's all bad, because it's not. It can be pretty amazing getting to see your work during nursing school pay off. And you learn so much. Honestly there are a lot of shifts where I'm more mentally exhausted than physically, because there's so much to absorb.

  • Dec 28 '17

    Working, absolutely. I'm halfway through my first year and it is nothing like nursing school. It feels like my brain is whirring a million miles a minute most of the time. No number of lectures can make you realize the sheer amount of responsibility you have on your shoulders. That's not to say it's all bad, because it's not. It can be pretty amazing getting to see your work during nursing school pay off. And you learn so much. Honestly there are a lot of shifts where I'm more mentally exhausted than physically, because there's so much to absorb.

  • Dec 27 '17

    Working, absolutely. I'm halfway through my first year and it is nothing like nursing school. It feels like my brain is whirring a million miles a minute most of the time. No number of lectures can make you realize the sheer amount of responsibility you have on your shoulders. That's not to say it's all bad, because it's not. It can be pretty amazing getting to see your work during nursing school pay off. And you learn so much. Honestly there are a lot of shifts where I'm more mentally exhausted than physically, because there's so much to absorb.

  • Dec 27 '17

    Working, absolutely. I'm halfway through my first year and it is nothing like nursing school. It feels like my brain is whirring a million miles a minute most of the time. No number of lectures can make you realize the sheer amount of responsibility you have on your shoulders. That's not to say it's all bad, because it's not. It can be pretty amazing getting to see your work during nursing school pay off. And you learn so much. Honestly there are a lot of shifts where I'm more mentally exhausted than physically, because there's so much to absorb.

  • Dec 26 '17

    Working, absolutely. I'm halfway through my first year and it is nothing like nursing school. It feels like my brain is whirring a million miles a minute most of the time. No number of lectures can make you realize the sheer amount of responsibility you have on your shoulders. That's not to say it's all bad, because it's not. It can be pretty amazing getting to see your work during nursing school pay off. And you learn so much. Honestly there are a lot of shifts where I'm more mentally exhausted than physically, because there's so much to absorb.

  • Dec 23 '17

    Working, absolutely. I'm halfway through my first year and it is nothing like nursing school. It feels like my brain is whirring a million miles a minute most of the time. No number of lectures can make you realize the sheer amount of responsibility you have on your shoulders. That's not to say it's all bad, because it's not. It can be pretty amazing getting to see your work during nursing school pay off. And you learn so much. Honestly there are a lot of shifts where I'm more mentally exhausted than physically, because there's so much to absorb.

  • Dec 23 '17

    Working, absolutely. I'm halfway through my first year and it is nothing like nursing school. It feels like my brain is whirring a million miles a minute most of the time. No number of lectures can make you realize the sheer amount of responsibility you have on your shoulders. That's not to say it's all bad, because it's not. It can be pretty amazing getting to see your work during nursing school pay off. And you learn so much. Honestly there are a lot of shifts where I'm more mentally exhausted than physically, because there's so much to absorb.

  • Dec 22 '17

    Working, absolutely. I'm halfway through my first year and it is nothing like nursing school. It feels like my brain is whirring a million miles a minute most of the time. No number of lectures can make you realize the sheer amount of responsibility you have on your shoulders. That's not to say it's all bad, because it's not. It can be pretty amazing getting to see your work during nursing school pay off. And you learn so much. Honestly there are a lot of shifts where I'm more mentally exhausted than physically, because there's so much to absorb.

  • Dec 22 '17

    Working, absolutely. I'm halfway through my first year and it is nothing like nursing school. It feels like my brain is whirring a million miles a minute most of the time. No number of lectures can make you realize the sheer amount of responsibility you have on your shoulders. That's not to say it's all bad, because it's not. It can be pretty amazing getting to see your work during nursing school pay off. And you learn so much. Honestly there are a lot of shifts where I'm more mentally exhausted than physically, because there's so much to absorb.

  • Dec 22 '17

    Working, absolutely. I'm halfway through my first year and it is nothing like nursing school. It feels like my brain is whirring a million miles a minute most of the time. No number of lectures can make you realize the sheer amount of responsibility you have on your shoulders. That's not to say it's all bad, because it's not. It can be pretty amazing getting to see your work during nursing school pay off. And you learn so much. Honestly there are a lot of shifts where I'm more mentally exhausted than physically, because there's so much to absorb.

  • Dec 21 '17

    Working, absolutely. I'm halfway through my first year and it is nothing like nursing school. It feels like my brain is whirring a million miles a minute most of the time. No number of lectures can make you realize the sheer amount of responsibility you have on your shoulders. That's not to say it's all bad, because it's not. It can be pretty amazing getting to see your work during nursing school pay off. And you learn so much. Honestly there are a lot of shifts where I'm more mentally exhausted than physically, because there's so much to absorb.

  • Dec 21 '17

    Working, absolutely. I'm halfway through my first year and it is nothing like nursing school. It feels like my brain is whirring a million miles a minute most of the time. No number of lectures can make you realize the sheer amount of responsibility you have on your shoulders. That's not to say it's all bad, because it's not. It can be pretty amazing getting to see your work during nursing school pay off. And you learn so much. Honestly there are a lot of shifts where I'm more mentally exhausted than physically, because there's so much to absorb.


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