Jump to content
2019 Nursing Salary Survey Read more... ×

Mean People

Relations   (1,806 Views 9 Comments)
by LogCabinMom LogCabinMom (New Member) New Member

5,172 Visitors; 137 Posts

advertisement

Hi everyone -

I've finally landed my dream job (well, one of them) on a large CV surgical floor at a very respected hospital. It's a challenging job - I've been a nurse for over 7 years and have worked in a variety of places, but have always felt I lacked the skillset and confidence to be a critical-care RN. I've worked in med/surg, hem/onc, VNA, LTC. I hoped to learn the skillset here and was planning to settle in long-term.

This floor has just hired on approx 20-25 new RNs, and maybe 3-4 experienced nurses (of which I am one). I am also the oldest (I'm 48). They've also just hired a new Director.

The nurses that have been there (some for 16-20 years) are, with maybe 1-2 exceptions, the crankiest bunch I have ever worked with. The Clinical Managers are those that have been there maybe 5-6yrs, and completely unapproachable and, I have to say, ******. This whole floor is one of the most hostile I have ever worked on - and I've worked in places where the LPNs called the RNs "Retarded Nurses," but stuck it out and eventually became friendly with them.

I detest going into this job. I just found out last night that I was "talked about" on one of the night shifts last week, after a night nurse at shift change answered my patient's call light and thought he was crashing. I went in there almost immediately, assessed the situation for what it was - acute pain, not an MI - and when she offered to get the pain med, accepted what I thought was an act of kindness. She later told the clinical mgr that "I wasn't doing anything" and that I "told her to go get the Toradol". Luckily, the nurse I was giving report to that night stood up for me and informed the mgr what really happened.

I'm not sure what the best way to handle this is; I also work at a LTC where they are honestly grateful and appreciative for me every minute I am there. Thing is, I want to get the critical care skillset down, so want to stick it out for at least 2 years here. What is the best way to handle lateral violence? I'm not going to be everyone's friend, and I hate confrontation, but I need to stick up for myself on this floor in a way I have never had to before.

Any tips please?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

CrunchRN has 25 years experience as a ADN and works as a Nurse.

20 Likes; 1 Follower; 29,946 Visitors; 4,170 Posts

I guess that explains why they are hiring so many................................ if they can't figure out the problem you should let management know.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

canigraduate works as a RN.

1 Like; 3 Articles; 34,818 Visitors; 2,107 Posts

You need to file incident reports on every lateral violence incident and call HR and get them involved.

If it's endemic to the whole floor, you need to get upper management involved. It sounds like they were aware of the problem and tried to correct it. They need to know it isn't working.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Tweety has 28 years experience and works as a Med-Surg.

3 Likes; 2 Followers; 47,266 Visitors; 28,918 Posts

Sounds very toxic. Sounds like you're just going to have to be your own advocate, not give into the negativity and stand up for yourself. Once you do this, while not popular, people will more than likely not mess with you. Good luck.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

kbrn2002 has 25 years experience as a ADN, RN and works as a RN Supervisor.

267 Likes; 28,440 Visitors; 2,760 Posts

Gosh nurses can be a gossipy, bratty group can't they? As much as I overhear nurses talking about somebody else, I'd be deluded to think they don't also talk about me when I'm not there. As long as that cattiness doesn't extend to running to the manager and the manager actually paying attention to the cattiness I've learned it's easiest to just ignore the gossip mill conversations.

Now if the boss actually gives credence to these petty complaints and always sides with the favored nurse or group of nurses it may be time to move on. You can survive the gossip if you can pretend that it doesn't exist, but you can't survive the constant looking over your shoulder if your manager is also just looking to find something wrong.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Been there,done that has 33 years experience and works as a case manager.

263 Likes; 4 Followers; 68,495 Visitors; 6,203 Posts

There is no "handling "this level of lateral violence. Management is aware, and choosing to partake or ignore.

You are not learning the critical care concept in this environment. Hone your resume.. what other options can you see?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
advertisement

13,235 Visitors; 1,239 Posts

This could go either way. It may improve as they get to know you and accept you or it may not. I'd give it a little more time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

vegasmomma has 3 years experience.

3 Likes; 4,324 Visitors; 138 Posts

I think you should stick with it for your own benefit. Just continually show up, be friendly and get your experience and training. If things dont improve after 24 months move on.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

8 Likes; 1 Follower; 51 Articles; 93,012 Visitors; 4,800 Posts

Was the nurse who answered your call light a newer nurse? If so, a good learning experience on how assessments are crucial.

You had a co-worker who corrected the misconception. So that worked in your favor.

Learn every last little thing you can. Stick it out until you can reach your goal. Even if it is to be certified in critical care.

Otherwise, do your thing, document everything, keep your chin up. Co-worker's misery don't need your company. Just keep on doing your thing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
×