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Massage Therapy

Arizona   (1,839 Views 9 Comments)
by maddienurse maddienurse (New Member) New Member

1,223 Visitors; 23 Posts

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Are nurses in Arizona already able to perform massage therapy under their RN license? I have received mostly a "YES" answer to this.

Though I'd like to take some targeted courses on the types of relaxation massage I want to perform, I do not want to spend another 10,000 dollars on education if my RN and NP license suffice.

Thoughts on this?

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6,386 Visitors; 330 Posts

No, massage therapy is not within your scope of practice. If you want to call your self a nurse massage therapist or perform massage on your clients/patients, you need a massage license, which would require formal training. As a massage therapist and massage instructor, I can tell you that your background in nursing will help, but its a different world that just a few courses won't train or prepare you for.

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4,432 Visitors; 483 Posts

maddie,

I was a massage therapist for 10 years before becoming a registered nurse, and yes, massage therapy IS within the scope of practice for RNs and has been for quite sometime. Actually, it is within the scope of practice for Physical Therapists, Occupational Therapists, MDs and NDs as well. However, one cannot identify themselves as a massage therapist (in most states anyway) unless you hold a license saying so. Just as prescribing medication is within a nurse practitioner's scope of practice she can't call herself a Physician. That being said, however, I feel that someone who hasn't been to massage school isn't prepared enough to make a business of it.

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4,432 Visitors; 483 Posts

Maddie,

If you look under "Article 2"Licensure; persons and activities not required to be licensed of the Arizona Massage Therapy Board's website, you will see where Licensed health care providers are exempt providing they do not identify themselves as a massage therapist.

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That is all true by law, however if you understand the meaning of "scope of practice" it is not only what the law allows you to do, but what you are trained and qualified to do. If you have no formal, qualified massage training, then performing massage is not within your scope of practice, and ethically, you can't perform it on clients/patients.

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1,223 Visitors; 23 Posts

How do I PM someone??? Also--thanks to replies regarding massage. I have found out that an NP may perform massage but not calling herself a massage therapist.I actually have taken a number of massage classes over the past few years, and have been doing one hour Lomi massages for friends and family for some time.So-- am just considering where to go with it all-- Thanks to all who have replied.I do appreciate the training an LMT takes, but as an NP do not need A and P classes,etc. And I particularly do mot want to spend another $10,000!!!

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maddie,

Alot of colleges that offer massage therapy programs will let you transfer in credits. So you wouldn't have repeat all the A&P (however, we do focus on muscles and it may be another angle more relative to massage) and the cost would be reduced. If you are going to make massage a large part of your practice, and you life, I still highly highly highly recommend formal massage training. Just taking CEU courses aren't going to give you the foundation that great massage therapists are grounded in.

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maddie,

I had another thought. You could attend Phoenix College or Central Az College, both community colleges. They offer massage therapy programs, associates I believe. Tuition is like $65 a credit hour, vs. $400 at the vocational schools, and your college credits would be more likely to transfer. Just an idea for you, as I would really like to see you get professional training. I think that you will be happy that you did.

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