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how many gtts in a ml?

Nurses   (33,899 Views 13 Comments)
by nurse_bride nurse_bride (New) New

1,198 Profile Views; 6 Posts

I am at work, and i have a pt with a chylis (doesn't happen often). I am alone (no other nurses) and i need to know jow many gtts in a ml, it is infusing at 16gtts per min, i want to write how many ml per hour. there is no set rate, it is palliative care.

thanks, i know this is a dumb question!

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Andy S. has 15 years experience as a BSN, RN.

157 Posts; 4,290 Profile Views

nurse_bride,

It all depends on your tubing. Most IV tubing is 10 gtts/ml, but peds is 60gtts/ml. Check your packaging and it should tell you.

Good luck, sorry you are working by yourself!

Andy

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6 Posts; 1,198 Profile Views

i know, but what is the formula? i am on night shift alone, sucks!

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6 Posts; 1,198 Profile Views

never mind, duh!!! i figured it out

drop factor is 10 per ml

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39 Posts; 1,951 Profile Views

4-5gtt's = 1 ml 60gtt's = 5ml not agreed to accuracy-- 1 minim = 1gtt , not exact.

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837 Posts; 10,955 Profile Views

What is a gtt? I know a minim as an archaic unit of measurement.

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live4today is a RN and specializes in Community Health Nurse.

5,099 Posts; 22,696 Profile Views

Back in the 1980's when I went to school :chair:

1ml (or 1cc) = 15-16 minums.

0.06 ml = 1 minum = 1 gtt [gtt stands for "drop"]

:kiss

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837 Posts; 10,955 Profile Views

Thank you, I think! but how does "gtt" get to be "drop"? sorry to be so thick!

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39 Posts; 1,951 Profile Views

cheerful, I stand corrected-(-no use = forgetting) gtt= gutta, a drop.God I hate to be misstaken in calc's--one of my strong areas---well , the memory is the 2nd thing to go!!!!

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723 Posts; 10,853 Profile Views

Originally posted by AJACKT33Z

---well , the memory is the 2nd thing to go!!!!

I've heard that, too. But I never quote it, because some jerk ALWAYS asks what the first thing to go was, and I can't remember!!!! I mean, that's a joke, isn't it? But I really can't. It was either close vision or knees.

Love

Dennie

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KarafromPhilly specializes in cardiac ICU.

212 Posts; 4,142 Profile Views

ok, here's the rule, imho the simplest way to remember.:specs:

first, what is cc/hr? if you are using micro-tubing, you're in luck--cc/hr = drops/min with micro-tubing (tubing with drop factor of 60).

(drop factor is the number of drops from this tubing that = 1 cc.)

if drop factor is 15, divide cc/hr by 4 for drop/min.

if drop factor is 10, divide cc/hr by 6 for drop/min.

yer home free!

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712 Posts; 5,043 Profile Views

If you set it on a pump it will be 60 gtts a minute regardless what tubing you put in. :-)

Cheerfuldoer I haven't seen that formula since nursing school gosh! :-) Bringing back pharmacology memories!!!!!

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