Jump to content

Mandatory 12 hour shifts

Nurses   (4,070 Views 9 Comments)
by melissasrn melissasrn (New) New

melissasrn has 10 years experience and specializes in Med-Surg.

836 Profile Views; 8 Posts

I was hired for 8 hour shifts (even signed a paper saying what shift I'd be working), but now my employer is going to mandatory 12 hour shifts. Is this legal for those of us hired for 8 hour shifts to be forced to work 12 hour shifts instead? If so, then why sign that paper in the first place? Thanks!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

22 Posts; 1,419 Profile Views

I was hired for 8 hour shifts (even signed a paper saying what shift I'd be working), but now my employer is going to mandatory 12 hour shifts. Is this legal for those of us hired for 8 hour shifts to be forced to work 12 hour shifts instead? If so, then why sign that paper in the first place? Thanks!

What nursing association is in your state or town you can discuss this with? If they are going to force you I would not want to work for that employer anymore. Not sure about the laws where you live if there are any protections for you.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

melissasrn has 10 years experience and specializes in Med-Surg.

8 Posts; 836 Profile Views

I'm not sure as I'm just now starting to research the legality of it all. I've already turned in my letter of resignation but I want to know if what my hospital is doing is legal. Thanks so much for the quick reply!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

174 Posts; 2,065 Profile Views

Most facilities have something in policy about being able to alter schedules as they need. Unless you are unionized, that might be different. (maybe other states are different though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Tweety has 28 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Med-Surg, Trauma, Ortho, Neuro, Cardiac.

2 Followers; 28,921 Posts; 47,927 Profile Views

Many of the units here were mandated to work 12-hour shifts against the will of some of the workers. It all worked out in the end.

It's poor practice on their part because surely they knew they'd be mandated 12-hours when they hired you. But perhaps the person that hired you didn't know this, sometimes we're all the last to know.

Good luck.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

486 Posts; 9,755 Profile Views

Does anyone know why the industry has largely shifted to 12-hour days in the first place? Is it because it is easier on management to staff two 12s rather than 8s and 10s?

To the OP, I would imagine that because of your contract, you might be able to pursue an unemployment claim due to the change and your resulting resignation.

I really think 12-hour shifts are a major factor in burnout. I also think they create tired employees and all the negatives that come with that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

26 Posts; 1,066 Profile Views

Doesn't sound like a very nurse friendly employer to me. :monkeydance:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

P_RN has 30 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in ORTHOPAEDICS-CERTIFIED SINCE 89.

6,011 Posts; 33,447 Profile Views

It is a lot easier to schedule FTEs when you have only 12h shifts. Either the staff person is there or they're off. Period.

Now as far as what it does to the human body I will just say it about killed me. For commuters it automatically turns into a 14-16h day depending on if you get off on time or stay over to finish up a few things.

It's easier on the gasoline-fewer trips, easier on the car-same reason.

However it's mayhem when you try to have 4h 6h 8h 12h and 16h employees to schedule. Then it's just not worth the hassle.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

melissasrn has 10 years experience and specializes in Med-Surg.

8 Posts; 836 Profile Views

I was hired almost 10 years ago when the unit was strictly 8 hour shifts. Workers gradually went to 12 hour shifts over the years and now there are just a few of us that meet up that do the 8s. We were told we create "holes" in the schedule when we take time off for vacations, etc. I can understand that. However, we WERE the last to know.

For about a year, I did do an 11a-11p shift that I really liked at I DO commute and it was much cheaper on gas, etc. I can't do a 7a-7p shift because of family obligations and nights is out of the question, so 3-11 has worked fairly well over the years. For someone working 7a-3p or even 11p-7a, tacking on 4 hours at the beginning or end of a shift seems easier than transitioning from 3-11 to either days OR nights.

My manager claims those of us still doing the 8 hour shifts are her "best" nurses, so surely this isn't a coincidence (we are also the ones with the most seniority and have a higher percentage of PDO time). I've done both and know fully well the pros and cons of doing each, and the 12's ARE very hard on the body even though there are more days off.

Our rural hospital was recently bought out by a larger health care organization, so I'm sure that's a major reason for the changes. I know my manager's hands are somewhat tied as she claims the DON is forcing her to go all 12s. She even considered going to all 8s, but she's lose even more nurses that way as those doing the 12s now won't go back to the 8s.

So I guess what it boils down to is that our 8s and 12s will no longer co-exist in harmony. I hate the thoughts of starting all over somewhere else, but then I also know my hospital will be losing more than one excellent nurse. All for the sake of progress, I assume. I've been told the hospital owes me nothing despite my loyalty over the years (2 call-ins in 10 years can't be so bad!). So it's sadly all about the bottom line.

Thanks to all for the comments! Pursuing the unemployment aspect of it all sounds like a viable option although I hope finding another nurse-friendly job will happen quickly.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
×