Is Shortage in Nursing really a hoax?

  1. I have researched the nursing school admissions for four months now and find that most of them are "competitive". I begin to think that the shortage is really a hoax.

    Does anyone have any comment regarding this story?
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    About mikefilmstudent

    Joined: Oct '17; Posts: 7; Likes: 2

    10 Comments

  3. by   elkpark
    There hasn't been a true shortage for a long time. There are parts of the country that have a shortage, and, in many parts of the country, the nursing "market" is entirely saturated. There are some issues with distribution of nurses around the country, but no real shortage.
  4. by   rob95
    Well I do think some schools advertise that there is a shortage just for the sake of advertisement but I truly do believe in SOME states their are shortages. I live in Ohio, and their has been a shortage for about 2 years now. If you notice, a lot of nurses complain about having to work extra hard due to being short staffed. According to Bureau of Labor Statistics projections, by 2022 there will be more than 1 million jobs for RNs. It really does make sense, the baby booming population are elderly or disabled by now and a majority of the current nurses are in their 50s and will retire soon.
  5. by   elkpark
    Quote from rob95
    If you notice, a lot of nurses complain about having to work extra hard due to being short staffed.
    That's typically because employers choose to keep staffing low for financial reasons, not because they couldn't hire more nurses tomorrow if they wanted to.

    Quote from rob95
    According to Bureau of Labor Statistics projections, by 2022 there will be more than 1 million jobs for RNs. It really does make sense, the baby booming population are elderly or disabled by now and a majority of the current nurses are in their 50s and will retire soon.
    A) Different government agencies have different numbers and opinions on this. The DHHS section specifically related to US healthcare services and providers is predicting a large national surplus of RNs by 2025. Guess we'll just have to wait and see which prediction turns out to be more accurate.

    B) Nurses in their 50s are going to be retiring soon? I and plenty of other nurses I know are in our 60s and have no plans to retire any time soon.
  6. by   rob95
    B) Nurses in their 50s are going to be retiring soon? I and plenty of other nurses I know are in our 60s and have no plans to retire any time soon.[/QUOTE]

    Thats fine but I highly doubt a majority of Nurses in their 60s and 70s will still be working unless they had no choice. Most nurses are around 40-50 they can't work FOREVER, statistics prove it. Again, this doesn't have to apply to YOU or the "plenty of other nurses you know" but it likely applies to the majority of people in the age group
  7. by   Mavrick
    Quote from rob95
    Thats fine but I highly doubt a majority of Nurses in their 60s and 70s will still be working unless they had no choice. Most nurses are around 40-50 they can't work FOREVER, statistics prove it. Again, this doesn't have to apply to YOU or the "plenty of other nurses you know" but it likely applies to the majority of people in the age group
    There is quite a difference between soon and forever. People making decisions about nursing school want to know if there will be a job for them when they finish school. Nurses in their 40s and 50s now can easily work another 10 to 15 years. Not "forever" but long enough to put a real burden on people who need a job after graduation to pay back student loans and won't be able to find one in some markets.

    I'm 62 and have every intention of working another 5 years before giving up my plum PACU position.
  8. by   RobtheORNurse
    There are geographic shortages. Georgia has a severe nursing shortage. Where I live, there is a nursing school on every corner it seems and there are few job openings. So the answer is Yes and No.
  9. by   ~♪♫ in my ♥~
    Quote from elkpark
    Nurses in their 50s are going to be retiring soon?
    I and plenty of other nurses I know are in our 60s and have no plans to retire any time soon.
    I plan to work full-time (12x3) until I'm 70 and then PD until I'm unable to...
  10. by   ~♪♫ in my ♥~
    There may in fact be a shortage of nurses looking to take underpaid, overworked, crappy jobs... there is no shortage at all of nurses for good-paying jobs in good organizations... none... at all...

    When looking at BLS statistics and projections, note that the vast majority of jobs with high predicted growth also pay very poorly... things like home health aide and the like. Nursing is an incredibly broad field and few blanket statements about "nursing" are generally accurate.
  11. by   PeeWeeQ
    It depends on where you are and what is going on there. I live in Western Wisconsin. We are a growing community (with a very large elderly population). We have A LOT of LTC facilities, many regular, outpatient clinics, several outpatient surgery centers, 2 hospitals, and 1 more hospital being built. We have a technical college that offers an ADN and a UW college that offers a BSN. And no--we do not have enough nurses here. Not by a long shot...
  12. by   Oldmahubbard
    I have been a nurse for almost 30 years and there has never been a shortage of nurses for the good nursing jobs. I doubt there ever will be.

    As far as people continuing to work into their 60's and 70's?

    Very few nurses working today will have a pension. That means they will eventually have to live on their Social Security check, and their own savings, which is what a company sponsored 401k is essentially.

    A typical social security benefit is 1500-2000 dollars a month. Depending on your work history. Can you live on it?

    Even if you can sock as much as 500 dollars a month in a 401k, how long will it take before you have significant savings? The answer is decades.

    The average 401k has less than 100,000 dollars.

    I think a lot of people will have to keep working.

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