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Maggots found on Portland nursing home patient

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Not_A_Hat_Person has 10 years experience as a RN.

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Horrifying. Worse, he was on hospice.

PORTLAND-The Maine Department of Health and Human Services has released a report saying maggots were found on the body of a patient at a Portland nursing home.

WMTW-TV reports that staff at St. Joseph's Manor made the discovery. The state says the staff waited four days to treat the patient. The maggots were around the patient's groin and numbered in the hundreds, according to one estimate.

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happy2learn works as a Employed at a Level 1 Trauma Center.

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That's horrible. I don't even know what else to say.

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5,408 Visitors; 379 Posts

I'm going to put in a quick 2 cents ...

A: It wasn't the reason this person passed away.

B: Who is to say this resident wasn't (for lack of a better term in this situation) rotting away because of whatever disease process was going on?? While there's not been a case, to my knowledge, of a person that has had a case of maggots AFTER hospitalization, I HAVE seen individuals that have passed away from multisystem disease that had the end result of having horrible decub's.

C: I do have to admit, the person probably was quite rank if this was something that had been going on for quite a while, but it seems slightly sensationalized in the news report ... though I've seen a lot of stuff, so there is rarely something that surprises me...

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iodine works as a RN, Cat. case manager.

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Not sure some will remember this: sterile maggots have been ordered to APPLY to open wounds and provide debriedment of said wound.

This is obviously not the same in this case but they work really well and clean up a wound better than a lot of surgeons.

OK

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5,408 Visitors; 379 Posts

Not sure some will remember this: sterile maggots have been ordered to APPLY to open wounds and provide debriedment of said wound.

This is obviously not the same in this case but they work really well and clean up a wound better than a lot of surgeons.

OK

Actually no you're quite right. They've gotten bad stigma b/c of what they're attracted to, but it's 100% acceptable treatment for many nasty wounds in some regions!

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53,501 Visitors; 11,191 Posts

Actually no you're quite right. They've gotten bad stigma b/c of what they're attracted to, but it's 100% acceptable treatment for many nasty wounds in some regions!

it's highly acceptable tx IF it is what's been prescribed.

medicinal maggots are bred in a lab, for therapeutic purposes.)

this is clearly not the case at the facility.

this pt had decaying ulcers/lesions, whose neglect resulted in a maggot infestation.

i am sickened this poor pt died in the manner he did.

i don't know who's to blame.

whether it's staff at the facility, hospice staff or both.

but i pray that someone pays for this dearly.

leslie

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it's highly acceptable tx IF it is what's been prescribed.

medicinal maggots are bred in a lab, for therapeutic purposes.)

this is clearly not the case at the facility.

this pt had decaying ulcers/lesions, whose neglect resulted in a maggot infestation.

i am sickened this poor pt died in the manner he did.

i don't know who's to blame.

whether it's staff at the facility, hospice staff or both.

but i pray that someone pays for this dearly.

leslie

This is going to sound totally non-compassionate, but it's not ... it's pointing out the facts.

#1- They said it did not contribute to the deceased actually dying

#2- Maggots do not eat GOOD flesh typically, only dead / necrotic tissue. This would not cause any pain what-so-ever to the patient as the tissue is already dead.

#3- Debriding / placing solvents on the patient that is deadly enough to kill maggots (maggots are notoriously resilient) would potentially cause more pain to the patient than the patient already was in from the wounds he/she already had.

#4- If the patient was a DNR-CC only, the above debriding would not have happened... The patient died of whatever disease process they came in with. Same end result, but I do agree the facility needs to be looked at. I definitely don't agree with taking one or a few people and burning them at the stake as you suggest, however.

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#1- They said it did not contribute to the deceased actually dying

#2- Maggots do not eat GOOD flesh typically, only dead / necrotic tissue. This would not cause any pain what-so-ever to the patient as the tissue is already dead.

#3- Debriding / placing solvents on the patient that is deadly enough to kill maggots (maggots are notoriously resilient) would potentially cause more pain to the patient than the patient already was in from the wounds he/she already had.

#4- If the patient was a DNR-CC only, the above debriding would not have happened... The patient died of whatever disease process they came in with.

Maybe so...

Still I wound not want to be found that way unless it was a specific tx ordered by the doctor.

Edited by TheCommuter
quotation blocks

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Maybe so...

Still I wound not want to be found that way unless it was a specific tx ordered by the doctor.

Oh I totally understand that viewpoint. You all have to realize, however, that this person had sores that were so necrotic that flies were attracted in the first place. He/she was basically rotting from the inside out as it was, so whether it was ordered by the doc or not, the ends were not changed by the fact that they were present or not...

I have a feeling this was probably potentiated by a freak-out session brought on by the family. The sad thing is there's nothing they can do to bring their loved ones back... They need to accept this fact...

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53,501 Visitors; 11,191 Posts

This is going to sound totally non-compassionate, but it's not ... it's pointing out the facts.

#1- They said it did not contribute to the deceased actually dying

#2- Maggots do not eat GOOD flesh typically, only dead / necrotic tissue. This would not cause any pain what-so-ever to the patient as the tissue is already dead.

#3- Debriding / placing solvents on the patient that is deadly enough to kill maggots (maggots are notoriously resilient) would potentially cause more pain to the patient than the patient already was in from the wounds he/she already had.

#4- If the patient was a DNR-CC only, the above debriding would not have happened... The patient died of whatever disease process they came in with. Same end result, but I do agree the facility needs to be looked at. I definitely don't agree with taking one or a few people and burning them at the stake as you suggest, however.

1. not for one minute, did i think his death was r/t maggot infestation.

2. not worried about pain. it's the indignity of a dying man unable to be treated with the most basic of human rights.

whether it's from human neglect or unavoidable circumstances, it still sucks.

3. i was thinking there was some of maggot shampoo...is there not? i'm amazed that it's ltd to something invasive and painful...something's off.

4. IF it shows neglect...i'd pray for a serious punishment.

leslie

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5,408 Visitors; 379 Posts

1. not for one minute, did i think his death was r/t maggot infestation.

2. not worried about pain. it's the indignity of a dying man unable to be treated with the most basic of human rights.

whether it's from human neglect or unavoidable circumstances, it still sucks.

3. i was thinking there was some of maggot shampoo...is there not? i'm amazed that it's ltd to something invasive and painful...something's off.

4. IF it shows neglect...i'd pray for a serious punishment.

leslie

I guess that's where communication breaks down. People view things so differently. You call it basic human rights, I call it unfortunate events.

The same thing goes for many things in life. Take vanity / protection of privacy for individuals. I routinely deal with men (and some women) that don't give a rats fat butt whether or not they flap in the breeze (back AND front), yet others that react when changing their gowns as if you're strip searching them and taking pictures even though NOBODY else is in the room but staff, and no skin other than arms is shown because I'm conscientious that patients might not like being exposed. This all being said, it's gross the deceased had maggots, but, again, it doesn't change the fact that the person died of unrelated circumstances.

Even IF a special shampoo (FWIW I'm imagining if there is a maggot shampoo then it'd be a lice-like shampoo, and from what I hear on INTACT skin is *not* pleasant and slightly burns). From personal experience, though, bleach doesn't kill them, vinegar doesn't kill them, cleaners don't kill them, the only thing I've found that DOES is engine degreaser, and ... well ... that's caustic enough to get battery acid a run for its money, sooooo....

Finally this is something that was a multiple day ordeal and possibly longer. This means that there is not a single person to single out and shake a finger at/punish as you suggest. It's obviously something wrong with the system.

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