What's the best way to supervise the CNA's?

  1. I am hoping to return to LTC soon as a floor LTC LPN. What are your suggestions as to how to communicate effectively with the CNA's and how to deal with problem CNA's? Thanks for any suggestions.
  2. Visit Blackcat99 profile page

    About Blackcat99

    Joined: Jan '04; Posts: 3,163; Likes: 1,157
    from US

    6 Comments

  3. by   SarcasticLVN
    When I first started in Ltc my cnas walked all over me because I am fresh eat.. For the most part now they listen to me and don't talk back (except for a select few but we just joke around). Other nurses i work with have no relationship with their cnas so no teamwork takes place. You shouldn't be their best friend but treat them with respect. I always offer to help them if I have time or it doesn't interview with my nursing responsibilities. Let them know who's boss in the beginning and say your not afraid to write them up.
  4. by   Blackcat99
    Thanks SarcasticLVN
    I think that is what I have done wrong in the past. Having no relationship with the CNA'S. I was always too busy doing "nursing work" that I never seemed to have time to talk to anyone. I am thinking that if I am able to get back to LTC, that I want to do things right this time. Since I am always so busy at LTC would it be appropriate to bring in a big pizza on my night off to thank the CNA's and to have a little time to chitchat and get to know them better?
  5. by   Lynx25
    Quote from Blackcat99
    Thanks SarcasticLVN
    I think that is what I have done wrong in the past. Having no relationship with the CNA'S. I was always too busy doing "nursing work" that I never seemed to have time to talk to anyone. I am thinking that if I am able to get back to LTC, that I want to do things right this time. Since I am always so busy at LTC would it be appropriate to bring in a big pizza on my night off to thank the CNA's and to have a little time to chitchat and get to know them better?
    I'm not coming in on my day off. I get pizza for everyone when I'm actually working. I have an excellent working relationship with the majority of the CNAs, there is a great deal of mutual respect, when they come to me with problems they have noted with the residents, I do NOT blow them off. (Key thing here. You wouldn't believe the nurses that believe that all of the aides are idiots, and won't follow up on problems reported)

    In return, the teamwork on my hall is freaking flawless most days, and I know they'll always have my back if something pops up.
  6. by   amoLucia
    Quote from Blackcat99
    Thanks SarcasticLVN
    I think that is what I have done wrong in the past. Having no relationship with the CNA'S. I was always too busy doing "nursing work" that I never seemed to have time to talk to anyone. I am thinking that if I am able to get back to LTC, that I want to do things right this time. Since I am always so busy at LTC would it be appropriate to bring in a big pizza on my night off to thank the CNA's and to have a little time to chitchat and get to know them better?
    Great idea - but why not pick a nite when you're all on together? Even if the nite runs crazy, you'll be sharing that too...
  7. by   txredheadnurse
    Make sure to include them on a daily basis about changes in care requirements, changes in medical conditions and in turn, seek their input about problem solving. The aides know the residents better than anyone else because they have the most involvement with the residents but so often their input and observations are not sought or are disrespected. Personally I find that people work more willingly if they feel valued and important to the success of the residents well being. I feel that including the aides in mutually respectul communication was key to my having a good shift and few disciplinary problems.

    Regarding those aides who chose to not work to their best ability or simply don't care I heartily endorse what Nascar Nurse always says: praise publically and counsel privately. Many people will respond inappropriately to a public reprimand but take a whole different tone behind closed doors. I also personally believe that it is worth giving someone a second chance but, at the same time, if an aide persistantly refuses to use respectful communication or interactions with anyone on the team cut 'em loose and find someone who will do the job with compassion, integrity and respect. It has been my experience that most aides do care about doing a quality job but they may not always know how or why to do things a certain way or to report certain things promptly. That is where an ongoing dialogue between nurse and aide is useful not only for communicating but teaching.
  8. by   txwildflower57
    I am a DON in LTC and I have found that several of you have the right idea. I tell my CNAs all the time that they are doing a great job. I have also found that if a situation occurs and "no one" knows exactly who's doing it that I can cover a good "counselling" to all during an inservice. I do praise them and thank them in public and so do my nurses. Work with them for a few shifts and you will get to know who's doing their job and who isn't then talk with them privately and let them know what you expect of them. Remember unfortunately some of our CNAs are not really strong in understanding their scope of practice and some think that they do all the work while the nurses sit on their butt and do nothing. We just went through our open book survey and we did not get any TAGS or Deficiencies - my people rock! My nurses do show them respect and help when needed - it's a team effort to care for your residents. Listen to the CNAs - they are your first line of patient care - they are your eyes, ears, and hands where the patients are concerned. The more you do that and respond to their comments, reports, etc the more they will respect you. Good luck - if you are close to Waco, TX - I have an opening, lol for and LVN.

close