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Lpn or rn

Pre-Nursing   (1,059 Views | 9 Replies)
by Bamapryncess Bamapryncess (New) New

73 Profile Views; 2 Posts

So I am debating going back to school at the beginning of the spring. I am currently a Medical assistant at a pediatrician office. I was looking for advise on what should be my next step. I know I want to move up but I am unsure where. Looking at the health system I work for looks like lpn is more clinical and rn is not. I love the clinical hours because I have children and it’s easy to work while they are at school. 

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3 Followers; 37,157 Posts; 98,955 Profile Views

Either license will afford ‘clinical’  opportunities, but you will want to obtain the RN license because it is way more versatile, ‘clinical’ focus or not. LPN tends to limit one to LTC or homecare. If you want more to choose from, go the RN route.

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kbrn2002 has 25 years experience as a ADN, RN and specializes in Geriatrics.

3,003 Posts; 29,386 Profile Views

If it's available in your area attend an RN program that allows you to sit the NCLEX for LPN partway through. That gives you the best of both worlds as you can work as an LPN while finishing your RN degree. Plus when thetime comes to take the NCLEX as an RN you will already have the test experience and will know exactly what to expect.

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Blue_Moon has 18 years experience as a BSN, RN.

1 Article; 478 Posts; 5,238 Profile Views

I think what she means is there is more clinical type jobs for LPN's in like dr offices than RN's which is true. However, you are limiting yourself to jobs as an LPN. You will make more money as an RN and there will be more opportunities to pick from.

There are many RN jobs that are normal 8-4 hours. For example, there's school nursing (you may need an BSN for that though), staff educators, management, hospital clinics, cancer infusion centers, many dr offices still need/want RN's, urgent cares, radiology nurse positions, OR, contact centers, cardiac cath labs, home health, etc. However, you MAY have to work 12 hr shifts in order to gain experience for those positions. 

You already works as a medical assistant in a pediatrician's office so if you pretty much know what working as an LPN in that type of setting would entail. (Pretty much what you're doing now.) If you're happy with that and know that's what you want then go for the LPN and then later if you decide you want something different or more you can go back for your RN

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KCMnurse has 36 years experience as a BSN, MSN, RN and specializes in Educator.

1 Article; 274 Posts; 7,700 Profile Views

Get the most bang for your buck and go for the RN. As previous posters have said - you will be limited as an LPN as many many places do not hire LPN's. Getting a job in a Doctor's office may be more difficult without nursing experience under your belt first.

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jlrm50 has 18 years experience.

89 Posts; 1,007 Profile Views

I was an LPN for years before going back for my RN.  There are much more opportunities for you if you have completed your RN.  In my area most LPN positions are getting phased out in the hospital setting. In fact, most job postings that I am seeing will only hire BSN prepared RNs.  I completed my BSN 2 years ago due to that change.  There are still LPN positions in LTC and some doc offices but none here at the hospital.  

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2 Posts; 73 Profile Views

Thank you all so much I like the idea of going the Rn route. That does make a lot of sense not to truly limit myself to Lpn. The company I work for offers a program that allows you to do classes thru them to become an Lpn but you have to stay with them after for a year or two which is understanding, which I have no intention on leaving it but as most you have said I don’t want to limit myself as well. 

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aprilmoss has 20 years experience and specializes in School Nurse.

260 Posts; 2,042 Profile Views

Are we talking about ending up in a school nursing situation or did you file this in the wrong thread?    As for school nursing, our district employs both RNs and LPNs, but the RNs do most of the real clinical stuff.   The LPNs are used to fill in jobs they want to delegate or for areas outside the general student wellness role.

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BunnyBunnyBSNRN has 13 years experience as a ASN, BSN and specializes in School Nursing, Ambulatory Care, etc..

1 Follower; 863 Posts; 13,715 Profile Views

A long, long time ago, in a duty station far, far away, I was trying to decide if I should do an LPN program at a tech school, or apply for the ADN program at the university in town.  A friend of mine worked as a unit clerk at one of the hospitals in town and she gave me one of the best pieces of advice I've ever received.  She said, she worked with too many LPNs who thought they would get their LPN and then work and go to school to do a bridge program to RN, but found that they didn't have time or energy and the money they would lose going part-time would impact their finances too much, so they got stuck.  She advised me to spend the extra year to get my RN (Associates) because, in the long run it would be better.  So, I took her advice and I have no regrets.  I did a 2 year ADN program, worked for five years and then did a 1 year (2 semester) RN to BSN program on line.

The bottom line, my advice is to go the RN path.

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sirI has 30 years experience as a MSN, APRN, NP and specializes in Education, FP, LNC, Forensics, ED, OB.

14 Followers; 19 Articles; 13,217 Posts; 138,643 Profile Views

Welcome to allnurses.com, Bamapryncess

We have moved your thread to the Pre-Nursing forum.

Good luck with your Nursing career plans.

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