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LPN to Paramedic

Nurses   (2,031 Views | 22 Replies)
by KimStrohl KimStrohl (New) New

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I am an LPN looking to also do Paramedic work. Do I still have to go through paramedic school to do this?

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Davey Do has 41 years experience and specializes in Psych, CD, HH, Admin, LTC, OR, ER, Med Surge.

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Yeah, well, it depends. To be classified and work as a Paramedic, yes training and certification is necessary.

However, as an LPN, you can "do Paramedic work" e.g. first aid standby at events, emergency transport, search and recovery type stuff for a volunteer emergency corp.

Anyway, that's how it was nearly 40 years ago when I was worked with Anomaly Volunteer Emergency Corps.

Welcome to AN.com and good luck to you in your endeavors, KimStrohl!

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Alex Egan has 9 years experience as a LPN, EMT-B and specializes in Home Health (PDN), Camp Nursing.

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Trust me when I tell you this. You do not even know what you don't know about working as a paramedic.

. Of course you would have to return to school. Nursing and EMS are not equivalent fields. There is some skill cross over of course but you really need specialist training to function in full capacity as an EMS provider of any level.

RNs with experience and additional training can challenge in some states but again that's usually after another 3-6 credits of school and more clinical time.

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AnnieOaklyRN is a BSN, RN, EMT-P and specializes in ED, Pedi Vasc access, Paramedic serving 6 towns.

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Yes, the responsibility of a paramedic is far greater then that of an LPN. You would also have to get your EMT basic first in most states, if not all. I suggest you get some EMT experience first before going for your medic. Remember you are responsible for acutely ill patients, and there is no doctor there to tell you what to do! Yes, you may use med control, but all they are doing is listening to YOUR assessment and what YOU think needs to be done, they aren't there so they cannot verify what you are telling them. For this reason you need to get really good at assessing patient's, is it asthma or COPD or is it CHF, is it a STEMI on the 12 lead (if so you need to decide if you need to activate a cath lab), are they in an SVT or afib with a rapid ventricular response, do they have a pneumothorax or a tension pneumothorax because one of those requires a need placed in the chest which you have to be willing to do, are they in respiratory failure and need intubation (RSI in some states), what is that rhythm ( you need to be really good and knowledgeable about everything, but cardiac stuff is where we make the biggest difference), is the Vtac , if so are they stable or unstable should we cardiovert or give meds, is that a first, second, or third degree block, if it's a third should we pace and sedate them, or should we try Atropine.... This is just a small example.

No offense to you, but I think you are grossly under estimating the responsibility of a paramedic when you ask if you can skip paramedic school and just get a license. Even RNs have to do the class or some sort of training! Have you ever intubated a patent?

In my opinion, having done both and having gone through the full educational programs for both I would NEVER recommend bridging or taking shortcuts. Paramedic and nursing are two different entities.

Annie

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AnnieOaklyRN is a BSN, RN, EMT-P and specializes in ED, Pedi Vasc access, Paramedic serving 6 towns.

1 Follower; 2,577 Posts; 34,627 Profile Views

Yeah, well, it depends. To be classified and work as a Paramedic, yes training and certification is necessary.

However, as an LPN, you can "do Paramedic work" e.g. first aid standby at events, emergency transport, search and recovery type stuff for a volunteer emergency corp.

Anyway, that's how it was nearly 40 years ago when I was worked with Anomaly Volunteer Emergency Corps.

Welcome to AN.com and good luck to you in your endeavors, KimStrohl!

I think he or she could do EMT work, not paramedic work!

Annie

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traumaRUs has 27 years experience as a MSN, APRN, CNS and specializes in Nephrology, Cardiology, ER, ICU.

165 Articles; 21,045 Posts; 192,828 Profile Views

The skillset of a paramedic is completely different from an LPN. I'm a pre-hospital RN on my rural fire dept. In IL, we have a PHRN licensure which includes a 2 day class but skills check offs including intubation, needle decompression, IVs, etc..

I'm now an APRN but my PHRN license trumps my MSN in the field. And...believe me I use two different skillsets for each scenario.

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That Guy has 6 years experience as a BSN, RN, EMT-B and specializes in Emergency/Cath Lab.

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Even as an RN I would have to go to medic school as there is stuff they can do we can't. Plus the whole prehospital world is widely different than in a hospital.

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CharleeFoxtrot has 7 years experience as a ADN, RN.

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Y...

Anyway, that's how it was nearly 40 years ago when I was worked with Anomaly Volunteer Emergency Corps.

It's not the same ball game anymore friend. Paramedics today have to have a lot of training, more cert classes are a year+. ACLS, lots of drugs, doses and when to do what. I went from paramedic to RN and one does not equal the other not even close. My first semester knocked a lot of the medic rough edges down, but not all of them :)

Anyway, back to the OP...why would you do want to do that? You'd be surprised at how little paramedics make for the long shifts and huge responsibility. You'd make more money picking up extra shifts at your regular job at time and a half.

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AnnieOaklyRN is a BSN, RN, EMT-P and specializes in ED, Pedi Vasc access, Paramedic serving 6 towns.

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Did I mention the drill? Yes, the drill... we can now drill into bone (IO) if we cannot get an IV in place, thus saving a lot of time on a sick patient! I am an IV nurse also though and believe RN should be able to use the IO!! It truly is easy!

Annie

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1,058 Posts; 11,087 Profile Views

Did I mention the drill? Yes, the drill... we can now drill into bone (IO) if we cannot get an IV in place, thus saving a lot of time on a sick patient! I am an IV nurse also though and believe RN should be able to use the IO!! It truly is easy!

Annie

OH that sucks... my state does allow for RN IO insertion given proper training and skill competence. As a paramedic and ED RN they know that I have the training and I have started many in the hospital.

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AnnieOaklyRN is a BSN, RN, EMT-P and specializes in ED, Pedi Vasc access, Paramedic serving 6 towns.

1 Follower; 2,577 Posts; 34,627 Profile Views

OH that sucks... my state does allow for RN IO insertion given proper training and skill competence. As a paramedic and ED RN they know that I have the training and I have started many in the hospital.

That is great you allowed to do that, especially in the ER! I am not sure if it is the state or the hospitals are just being scared for wheat ever reason... It's just silly.

Annie

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