Advice on Math in LVN Education

  1. Hi, I became a CNA/HHA in 1999 and I enjoyed the class and my teacher was great. I do want to become an LVN, but I'm not great at math. The math I have the biggest problem with is advanced math like algebra, Geometry, etc. I'm ok with the metric system and measuring, but not the advanced stuff. Now what kind of math does the LVN program in California entail? I would like to go to San Diego City College if I can. But I'm scared that I won't do well with the math section. I'm good in other subjects, but awful in mathematics.
  2. Visit JennMcK profile page

    About JennMcK, CNA

    Joined: Feb '07; Posts: 27
    SAHM; from US
    Specialty: 1 year(s) of experience

    8 Comments

  3. by   MsLady06
    Every state is different...here in PA its basic math...ratio proportion,fractions, four basics of math +-/x, decimals, algebraic expressions...If your not good then you may want to find a tutor or take a class @ community college on basic math.
  4. by   ginger58
    The most math I use is a simple proportion. There are always calculators around. Since we don't have to figure IV drip rates (how many drops do you see in a minute sort of thing) you shouldn't have to worry about that sort of thing, although med tests often do have that kind of question.
    The most common math I use is if you have a vial of medicine 5 mg/ml how much do you give for a dose of 2 mg? I think you'll be just fine.
  5. by   pagandeva2000
    I am horrible in math, but got an A in nursing drug calculations. I would consider purchasing a book on dosage calculations from amazon.com. In terms for taking math for the entrance exam, consider taking a math course that includes fractions, decimal points, and beginning algebra. A good GED book may offer that. Best of luck to you in your career!
  6. by   donsterRN
    Quote from pagandeva2000
    I am horrible in math, but got an A in nursing drug calculations. I would consider purchasing a book on dosage calculations from amazon.com. In terms for taking math for the entrance exam, consider taking a math course that includes fractions, decimal points, and beginning algebra. A good GED book may offer that. Best of luck to you in your career!
    This is excellent advice.

    Our book was "Calculation of Drug Dosages" by Sheila J. Ogden, 7th ed. The 8th edition will be released on March 16. It's a wonderful book that starts off with the basics and then just naturally progresses through to the more complicated stuff. It's well written and I think it's the best book of it's kind. Most of my class loved it, too.

    Much luck and success to you!
  7. by   JennMcK
    Thank you all. I was beginning to think it would be almost impossible for me. We didn't learn much about dosages and such in my CNA training.
  8. by   pagandeva2000
    Quote from JennMcK
    Thank you all. I was beginning to think it would be almost impossible for me. We didn't learn much about dosages and such in my CNA training.
    There would really be no reason to have it in CNA school, unless you were a medication aide. But, now, get what books you can and start practicing the examples provided in the books ahead of time, so that you will be better prepared. It is not really as bad as you would believe. Maybe the local library may have books available to borrow in case money is a current issue for you, or what you can do is look in the library for a dosage book that you like and then order one. Best wishes and keep us posted!!
  9. by   midcom
    I'm in pharmacology right now & quickly discovered that all you need to understand is when you multiply & when you divide. That's about it. Once you get the formulas down ( yes, even drip rates are easy) it's a piece of cake. And I imagine most schools let you use a calculator. I like it when our teacher says there will be math questions on a test as I know they are easy points to earn.
    Dixie
  10. by   pagandeva2000
    And, the great thing is that there is a calculator at the bottom of the screen, even during NCLEX, in case you get a calculations question. I used a calculator in school, also.

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