RNs who was once LPNs/LVNs

  1. How did you do it. I been an LPN for 5 years now. Need a raise badly. RN is the only answer. At this point in my life I have a family and other priorites no way a traditioinal college will do. How do you do it?? My brain ain't how it was when I was 19 so I am finding it tough for me to study and absorb the information. Some please give me some inspiration or point me in the right direction!!!

    Thanks
  2. Visit BoredLPN profile page

    About BoredLPN

    Joined: Sep '06; Posts: 24; Likes: 3
    LPN
    Specialty: 5 year(s) of experience in Peds/Dialysis

    11 Comments

  3. by   traumaRUs
    I was an LPN for 2 years, had two kids (one chronically ill and hospitalized several times) and hubby deployed to the first Gulf War. It can be done - just not too much fun. There is no easy way around it - its hard no matter which route you take. However, as you realize - the rewards are worth it.
  4. by   Jules A
    Quote from BoredLPN
    My brain ain't how it was when I was 19 so I am finding it tough for me to study and absorb the information. Some please give me some inspiration or point me in the right direction!!!Thanks
    Well my brain ain't what it was when I was 19 either but I get way better grades now and really enjoy learning like I didn't when I was younger. I'm sure its largely because I'm not concerned with all the "social stuff" I had on my mind back then but whatever the reason my focus is way better and I retain the information. Go for it!
  5. by   pagandeva2000
    Quote from BoredLPN
    How did you do it. I been an LPN for 5 years now. Need a raise badly. RN is the only answer. At this point in my life I have a family and other priorites no way a traditioinal college will do. How do you do it?? My brain ain't how it was when I was 19 so I am finding it tough for me to study and absorb the information. Some please give me some inspiration or point me in the right direction!!!

    Thanks
    When there is a will, a way will be made. Maybe you can take the pre-requisites one at a time, and inquire about the distance learning programs such as Excelsior that are available. Just thinking about how much money you really need may be the incentive to continue and finish the program. Best of luck!
  6. by   silverdollar
    hi, i was a lpn for 18 years. went thru excelcior. it was hard , wanted to quit several times but got encouragment from hubby.and i knew i had worked to hard to get as far s i did to just give up . im 50 years old and believe me i struggled because my brain is crowed with famkily work and dily problems. ilook back now and glad i perciveered. oh the old cleshea the more money you make the more you need is soooo true you have to pqay for anything you get. it want be easy but go for it dont wait til your an old _____ like me.
  7. by   moodychick
    Hi!

    I've been an LPN for 34 years. I started to go back during the "Lpn Scare" of 1986. Got most of my pre-req's done at that time. Am currently going to Excelsior and I'm 56! Hope to be finished by 2008 if I don't die first!!!!

    I work in the same ER that I started in in 1972. So, what I'm trying to say is "Go For It!!!!!" You can do it! God Bless!
  8. by   timetospreadmywings
    which do you think was harder, RN school or LPN school? I'm a nursing student and thinking very seriously about switching to an LPN program from an RN. I'm having some serious difficulties with the school I'm at and I want to hurry up and finish school because I'm in a domestic violence situation....and I really need to get out of school. If I do that...I'd go back to night school to finish my RN while I work on the weekends. Another queston I have is this.....when you were in LPN school, did you have to stay up all night (and I mean literally all night) doing paperwork and then have to go to clinicals the next day praying to God you didn't kill someone on your way to school.....by falling asleep at the wheel or worse than that....killing a patient? Any advice?????
  9. by   moodychick
    Yes, I did stay up all night doing paperwork! I learned to love coffee during those days! I was also working every day after school at a department store while I was going to school. I studied when I got home at 2300. If you have to have a job soon, then by all means take the LPN program. Gee, I never thought I'd say that!! But, please, please, finish the RN program as soon as you can after you start working as an LPN! You may find the RN program alittle easier after you become an LPN. Many schools that have LPN programs (RET's Tech) can start you in their RN program the next year while you are working. I wish I had had the opportunity to get my RN when I was 22; but, like you, I needed a job quickly to support myself.

    God Bless You in whatever you decide.
  10. by   mel1977
    I am waiting for my NCLEX results already thinking about this. I have NO kids-my only concern is working full time and going to school full time (I have some chronic pain and fatigue). My mom did it somehow when my sister and I were young. She was an LPN and got her RN in the eighties (she was a single mom around 35 I want to say). She always said, if she could do it so could I. So far, she is right. I guess you just have to do all the homework-research all your school options-CLEPing out, online, in class, community versus University and so forth. I WAS going to go online,but it is too risky that states may not accept that degree and since my husband and I aren't done moving I just can't risk that. If you know you don't want to move and your state recognizes it, that may be the way to go. I am learning myself. We are on the verge of moving as soon as hubby gets an offer for a job, so I have no idea WHERE I may even be living.
    Best wishes to you-you can do it!
  11. by   Lovin' my job!
    I was originally going to go to school for my RN but soon realized that I would have to spend almost a year to upgrade to even be accepted into the program. Then I found the LPN program. I didn't even know what an LPN was. One year full time...sure I thought I could handle that. Once I started the program I thought "holy crap, how would I ever had completed the RN?? This is alot of info!" I graduated 4 yrs ago and have seen the differences between the RN and LPN roles. I couldn't be happier to have chosen the LPN program. After the first year I contemplated going for my RN. WHY? Money. I felt underpaid for what was expected of me. I truely respect the role of the RN. But, in my experiences I saw them as more the clerical side the job. I was on the floor. Talking with the residents and the other staff. They were doing paperwork etc. That's what I saw in the LTC. In acute care I saw them running from room to room giving meds and reading lab reports. I was at the bed side. This is when I relized the money wasn't important to me. I love my role as the LPN. It's growing more and more. There came a point in my LTC when they decided the LPNs would start doing the care conferences on some of the residents. I believe we should be involved but this was a time consuming task that kept us at a desk when we could be on the floor. It's a very gray area. Who does what? Then the pay question comes in again. If I'm doing everything the RN is doing how come my wage does not reflect it? AARRG. Oh well. I'm still very happy being an LPN and there are wonderful RN's that I have had the priviledge of working alongside. I wish you the best of luck and hope you enjoy your new role. I must say you have a big the advantage of having 5 yrs nursing experience!!
  12. by   pagandeva2000
    Yes, you may be awake for long hours studying, and I personally can't say which is harder between LPN and RN school. RN has much more theory and pathphysiology and the LPN program is usually compressed into a short period of time.

    Some people go into LPN because there is a long waiting list for RN and they really want high GPAs since that program is so competitive, and then there are others that think that LPN courses are a waste of time, because the job is similar with less money. Like Lovin' my job, the money was not important to me...I was looking for mobility...something I could not gain as a nursing/medical assistant.
    Your domestic violence situation may call for you earning the quickest way out but, let me ask...how far are you into your RN program? Usually, they allow you to take the LPN exam midway through. I would do that, and continue the RN course, if possible.
  13. by   char1976
    Thanks "lovin my job". Finally a positive post! I'm in the LPN program, and starting to wonder if their was a happy or satisfied LPN out there.
    Thanks, it just felt good to read that, gives me the boost I needed for the 3 hrs of studying I'll have tonight after I put my 3 young kids to bed.
    Last edit by char1976 on Oct 5, '06

close