LPN or RN?

  1. I am currently in Gen education classes in a Hospital based nursing program and they have a section of the nursing program where you can test out and become an LPN. I have thought about doing that and continuing to finish my RN. Do you think its a good idea. From reading some of the LPN books the mode of thinking isn't the same as an RN. I don't want to mess up my thought patterns. The purpose for me doing it is to make money on the weekends while in school.

    What does everyone think
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    About heartstart

    Joined: Apr '06; Posts: 11

    25 Comments

  3. by   TheCommuter
    I'm an LVN who works full-time weekends while attending school full-time during the week. My suggestion is to earn your RN license because it will open more career opportunities and increase your earning potential. The so-called 'modes of thinking' are different because LPNs/LVNs are considered 'basic nurses' who are to care for stable patients with predictable outcomes, whereas RNs are considered 'professional nurses' who are to devise plans of care for all patients with varying degrees of acuity.
  4. by   TheCommuter
    By the way, becoming an LPN will not disturb your thought patterns. Numerous RNs in America were once LPNs/LVNs who have successfully made the transition from LPN to RN. I just wanted to throw that last tidbit in, as it might give you food for thought.
  5. by   heartstart
    Thanks for your input.
  6. by   catlady
    If you can get your LPN license without missing a beat while working on your RN, do it.
  7. by   tde1992
    I honestly would say don't waste your time with getting your LPN, your limiting yourself and just prolonging what you really want to do. On that note I would also say don't attend an Associate program that is also prolonging the inevitable because you will still be limited in your scope of practice as an RN. The people who benefit by those persons getting a LPN, then the ADN then the RN are institutions who will accumulate your money. And God forbid you go on and get your MSN or PhD, you will be in school forever and giving so much of your money and time to higher education institutions. Also the amount of time you spend getting an associate degree (you have to do the same prerequisites or maybe 1 or 2 classes less) then still 2 years of actuall nursing courses it will be a total of 4 years anyway. Just my opinion. Go for the brass ring.
    Last edit by tde1992 on Sep 11, '06
  8. by   Tweety
    Good luck in whatever you do. I can't say from experience, but from working with LPNs who have gone LPN to RN, I can say with confidence that I think your thought pattern can handle it.

    As you say the purpose is to make money while you're in school on the weekends, that is a good enough reason to do it. Some of us need to work while in school, As long as you keep your initial goals in sight, and you realize that depending on wear you live your job opportunities might be a bit limited (i.e. in my area new grad LPNs can't find jobs in hospitals) and you might find yourself in a job that wouldn't be your first choices.

    If you absolutely don't need the salary to make ends meet, you might just continue doing whatever it is you're doing now.

    Good luck!
  9. by   catlady
    Quote from tde1992
    I honestly would say don't waste your time with getting your LPN, your limiting yourself and just prolonging what you really want to do. On that note I would also say don't attend an Associate program that is also prolonging the inevitable because you will still be limited in your scope of practice as an RN. The people who benefit by those persons getting a LPN, then the ADN then the RN are institutions who will accumulate your money. And God forbid you go on and get your MSN or PhD, you will be in school forever and giving so much of your money and time to higher education institutions. Also the amount of time you spend getting an associate degree (you have to do the same prerequisites or maybe 1 or 2 classes less) then still 2 years of actuall nursing courses it will be a total of 4 years anyway. Just my opinion. Go for the brass ring.
    So in your opinion she should skip the LPN and go right for the Ph.D????

    She's already working on her RN and has the chance to take the NCLEX-PN while she's in school. It will give her instant marketability and increased income while she finishes up her RN. We don't know her career goals. But to suggest to someone not to "waste your time" getting an LPN is insulting to the great LPNs I know, and just plain wrong.
  10. by   Reno1978
    One program here has the option after the 1st year of your RN program you're eligible to take the NCLEX-PN exam to become an LPN, but once you complete the program in its entirety, you're eligible to take the NCLEX-RN exam. Is this the type of situation you're in? Getting your LPN, in that case, may be a good way to become gainfully employed to make some spare $ while you're in school.

    But also consider that some of your local hospitals may have Nurse Apprentice programs that you would be eligible for (usually after you've completed your first 1 or 2 semester of nursing classes) where you can earn extra money also....without the stress of studying for a licensure exam in the middle of your schooling!
  11. by   TheCommuter
    Quote from tde1992
    The people who benefit by those persons getting a LPN, then the ADN then the RN are institutions who will accumulate your money.
    I just felt the need to saucily interject, but a nurse with an ADN is an RN. A person who has earned an ADN does not need more education and training to progress to the RN level because (s)he is already an RN. Did you perhaps intend to type BSN? It feels and sounds that way, but the term 'BSN' is totally absent from your post.
  12. by   LPNMeg06
    I am currently an LPN who is taking classes to bridge into my RN while working as an LPN. My personal opinion is (and this is in no offense to people who go straight for their ADN or BSN) that working as a CNA or an LPN is a great experience when entering the nursing profession. I think it teaches nurses what it is like to be at the bottom rung, and that basic nursing care applies to all of us as caregivers...not just CNAs and LPNs as some like to think. So, if you need a job with decent pay, go for it. I have found that going from a CNA to an LPN, and now to an RN was the best route for me. It is always good to know how it feels to walk in someone elses shoes. And it also puts an end to that whole LPN vs RN debate. We are all caregivers with a common goal. To help those in need. And your BSN is always an option to consider when youre done....I dont necessarily think of it as something that needs to be rushed into. Do whatever is best for you. :wink2:

    Good luck, and congratulations on your accomplishments!
  13. by   tde1992
    Quite naturally I was referring to BSN. In my opinion going to an LPN program then to an ADN program then to a BSN that is a waste of time and money when you think about it logically and I am not trying to step on anyones toes. How can someone possibly think that you need to be a CNA to understand what a nurse does or that it will make you understand how your assistant feels. Do you hear a dentist saying that they need to be a dental assistant first, or an attorney saying that they have to be paralegals first. I am not saying anything is wrong with a person who wants to take a long traveled road to get to a profession, but why would you if you didn't have to. If it was up to me LPN and ADN programs would be eliminated. It makes the profession looks bad when you are working with other healthcare professionals who alot of the entry level programs requires a masters degree. I know because I am also a physical therapist. How can you expect other professionals to hold our opinions in high regards when we have people in our profession who doesn't even hold a college degree. I am not saying that this would make someone more intelligent over another but when you don't have the fundementals that hopefully you obtained from a bachelors degree, i am sorry but your opinion wouldn't matter much. And yes some nurses with a ADN or LPN's may have alot of clinical skills that was learned by doing the same thing over and over again, but that does not make you a professional. A true professional understands why they are doing what they do and can anticipate outcomes based on learned knowledge. Say what you like keep giving your money to schools. I also noticed alot of nurses don't want to be challenged or understand what they are doing. They are content with taking orders, pushing pills and running around all day like a chicken with their head cut off instead of sitting down and thinking about what is going on with the patient and how their interventions will affect the patients outcomes. Oh and before anyone comments my entire purpose of becoming a RN is to go on to CRNA school which I am doing after 1 year of bedside nursing.
  14. by   Tweety
    Please let's stay on topic. We will not debate which degree is better and whether LPN or ADNs should be eliminated or anything else of this nature.

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