Can I challenge the RN boards? - page 2

I heard long ago about an LPN who challenged and passed her RN boards. This was back in the 80s...can you do this still, and how would I find out about it?... Read More

  1. by   mattsmom81
    Quote from thekingster
    I assure you...if you have military corpsmen, LPN, or paramedic experience you can CURRENTLY challenge the RN board in West Virginia. I have the packet on my desk at home.

    Former military? Interested?

    Email me:
    Steven King
    thekingster@gmail.com

    Wow. I am totally amazed. OK LPN's...start the stampede to West Virginia.
  2. by   stevenking
    Quote from mattsmom81
    Wow. I am totally amazed. OK LPN's...start the stampede to West Virginia.
    For those who "might" be interested - and before - the stampede begins ...
    you usually have to be at least a 91C20 [yes...the nomenclature for this has changed to 91WM6] or higher before WV will "sign off" on this loophole. Make sure...you check with any states that allow reciprocity to WV - you might not be covered under this plan.

    Why do it? You can work in a federally with a license from *any* state.

    Clear as mud?

    Email me for specifics:
    Steven King
    The Kingster@gmail.com
    Last edit by stevenking on Mar 7, '05
  3. by   gerry79
    From the WV BON website. Wow, a shortcut to becoming an RN. I am a Coast Guard graduate of the Navy Independant Duty Corpsman School (CG uses the Navy school, most intense educational experience to date! 2000 grad), and am currently in nursing school now, and although I think that I could pass the NCLEX (most of my IDC school instructors passed the Cali NCLEX), I know that I dont posses the necessary skills to work as an RN. For anyone who chooses this route, I hope that you are prepared to function as an RN.





    3.1.d. In lieu of the educational qualifications specified in subdivision 3.1.c. of this
    rule, an applicant qualifying under W. Va. Code 30-24-1 et seq. shall meet the following requirements:

    3.1.d.1. An applicant shall have served on active duty in the medical corps of any of the armed forces of the United States and shall have successfully completed the course of instruction required to qualify her or him for rating as a medical specialist advanced, medical service technician or advanced hospital corpsman technician, or other equivalent rating in her or his particular branch of the armed forces;

    3.1.d.2. The applicant shall be honorably discharged from military service
  4. by   stevenking
    Quote from gerry79
    ...I know that I dont posses the necessary skills to work as an RN. For anyone who chooses this route, I hope that you are prepared to function as an RN.
    Having served as an LPN in a military MICU/SICU for nearly five years, I believe I could step into the role of an RN tomorrow. In the Army, our scope of practice is "different" due to our *possible* role as the "only" healthcare provider in a combat theater. Before this seems overly crass, please understand that I have my BA in a different field and have attained an MBA in Healthcare Management - my pursuit of an RN credential is merely a means to an end...I have full intention on returning to school to attain my BSN (how much sweeter would coursework be without the dreaded: "will I pass the NCLEX" question hanging over one's head?). Furthermore, in the US Army, there are only two things which LPN's can not do: IVP medication and "starting" blood. Now I can draw up IVP meds and I can spike blood, run it all the way to the patient, but I *need* an RN to press "start".

    I have discovered via moonlighting in GA and SC that "scope of practice" is a living entity in most facilities (For example, interns/residents at a hospital in SC did not *desire* to do A-lines anymore so the RT's *scope* was altered to include inserting A-lines into patients. Disclaimer: I have NO idea if this is permissible as a general rule for respiratory therapists.). Similarly, some hospitals in Georgia have instituted an LPN II category, which can (take a guess) do IVP medication after "certification".

    Furthermore, I feel that I can function in the role of an RN since I have attained ACLS (instructor), PALS (instructor), TNCC, ABLS, BTLS, and EMT-B certification.

    Dear moderator...please allow this post to serve as introduction to allnurses.com, as well.

    Affectionately,
    The Kingster
    Last edit by stevenking on Mar 7, '05
  5. by   gerry79
    Kingster, I do understand the scope of practice in the military can be much different than in the civilian sector. I have, and continue to, provide care in the Coast Guard that only a PA/NP or Physician would be allowed to perform in the civilain sector. You are correct in that my Navy training was provided so that I could work independently of a doctor. I guess since litigation is pretty much a non issue when dealing with active duty members, the goverment is taking the "cheap" way out by training unlicensed personnel, and allowing a wide scope of practice (at least in the Coast Guard). The sad part is that all of my training amounts to little if nothing in the civilian world. I guess that is a way for the military to insuring retention. Provide just enough training to get the job done, but not enough to allow the person to become licensed in the civilian sector.
    Last edit by gerry79 on Mar 9, '05
  6. by   RN34TX
    Quote from thekingster
    I plan to challenge the RN board in West Virginia, next year. However, I might return to college via Indiana State University - they have an LPN to BSN program that allows clinical competency to be determined via local preceptor. So..."sniff, sniff" - I am thinking that the days of the Excelsior "cram and get it" on a two-day test are gone.

    Steven King
    I can assure you that they are not yet gone in most states. Only IL, which has always been the case, and now only recently CA and KS, even though they allowed their graduates to be RN's since 1972.
    And I'm not trying to start anything, but I only wish it was a "2 day cram and get it" as you described.
    Not quite that simple and easy.
  7. by   NRSKarenRN
    kingster is correct that certain military training can be used in lieu of rn education program.

    west va law: http://www.wvsos.com/csrdocs/worddocs/19-03.doc

    also includes following provisions:

    3.2.c.1.e.1. copies of certificates of completion for military education; and
    [font='times new roman']3.2.c.1.e.2. course outlines for military education documenting nursing science content in the training program
    [font='times new roman']
    [font='times new roman']6.3. in the event an applicant fails the licensure examination two times, he or she may petition the board for permission to repeat the licensure examination. the board may deny approval for an applicant to repeat an examination after two failures if more than two years has lapsed since the applicant graduated from a nursing education program. in addition, the board may deny approval to repeat the examination after two failures if the applicant cannot show in the petition to repeat the examination more than two times that any further education has been taken by the applicant to correct deficiencies in his or her nursing knowledge.

    --------------
    west va law does not state that lpn's can petition to challenge rn exam.


    ny state permits some military healthcare training in lieu of education program for lpn licensure.
    http://www.op.nysed.gov/nursing.htm#educ

  8. by   stevenking
    Quote from NRSKarenRN
    Kingster is correct that certain military training can be used in lieu of RN education program.
    Yes, military healthcare practitioners - e.g. Army LPN, Navy Corpsmen, etc. - can challenge the RN Board in WV. This statement "in no way" implies that ALL LPN's can petition the RN Board to take the NCLEX in WV.

    Oh, and I am not an "Excelsior hater"...I have taken many of the EC exams since that was the pathway I was "on," as well. I only meant that with more and more colleges embracing an LPN to BSN type option (where clinicals are completed LOCALLY) will encourage more students to go that route.

    But, if not - hey, it's a free country.

    The Kingster
    Last edit by stevenking on Mar 8, '05
  9. by   stevenking
    Quote from gerry79
    The sad part is that all of my training amounts to little if nothing in the civilian world. I guess that is a way of the military insuring retention. Provide just enough training to get the job done, but not enough to allow the person to become licensed in the civilian sector.
    Gerry,
    I think you've hit the nail right on the proverbial head. The Army limits it's healthcare workers in the same fashion (and I'm sure it's all about retention). If I planned to stay on active duty - I would elect to do the Army's AECP (AMEDD Enlisted Commissioning Program) - which allows people to return to college to pick up a BSN (assuming certain prerequisites are met, of course) - entirely on the Army's dime (full time salary for full time education) - and then you get to give them three years. (Methinks a few trips to "hotter" places in the world is not worth it - especially since I am a single father...).

    I have mentally written the Medical Command of the US Army many times to eliminate the LPN program altogether and instead institute an ADN program. Keep enlisted soldiers as RN's (two year) and if you want to finish a BSN, then you can become an offier in the Army Nurse Corps. That would effectively eliminate our scope of practice issues and would be an incredible boon to recruitment.

    But alas...who knows?

    The Kingster
  10. by   mattsmom81
    Quote from NRSKarenRN
    Kingster is correct that certain military training can be used in lieu of RN education program.

    West VA law DOES NOT STATE that LPN's can petition to challenge RN exam.]
    Thanks Karen...I didn't think it would be 'as easy' as all LPN's simply heading to WV to challenge trhe NCLEX RN.
  11. by   rajuncajun
    Quote from thekingster
    The only state which I have confirmed that allows an LPN to challenge the RN board is West Virginia - and WV only allows former "military" LPN's to do this.

    If they allow it in March 2006, that's what I'll be doing!

    Steven King
    thekingster@gmail.com

    hey Kingster,

    I am currently on active duty working in an icu at a military hospital. My ncoic, another sgt I work with and I would like to find out how to challenge the boards for our RN. I've heard rumors about challenging tha Cali. boards, but I spoke with the state yesterday and they had no idea what i was talking about. You know for sure that military lpns can challenge the W.V. state board? If so how do i do it? Is it as easy as contacting them and telling them what I would like to do or will it take an act of congress to get this done? Thanks in advance for any advice you are able to give us.

    This we'll defend!

    SPC. G
    United States Army
  12. by   txspadequeenRN
    fftopic: But I love your user name, I thought about using that for myself when I signed up...






    Quote from rajuncajun
    hey Kingster,

    I am currently on active duty working in an icu at a military hospital. My ncoic, another sgt I work with and I would like to find out how to challenge the boards for our RN. I've heard rumors about challenging tha Cali. boards, but I spoke with the state yesterday and they had no idea what i was talking about. You know for sure that military lpns can challenge the W.V. state board? If so how do i do it? Is it as easy as contacting them and telling them what I would like to do or will it take an act of congress to get this done? Thanks in advance for any advice you are able to give us.

    This we'll defend!

    SPC. G
    United States Army
  13. by   NRSKarenRN
    alphabetical listing of state boards of nursing can found under "links" on top toolbar of website or https://allnurses.com/nursingboards-a-k.shtml

    california lpn & rn, and ny lpn regs specifically addresss military training. no statement in ny rn regulations.
    pa lpn regs state "equal training" nothing in rn requirement.

    note that in july 1, 2008, califrnia's seperate lpn and rn boards joining under one board.


    california lpn regs:
    california board of vocational nursing and psychiatric technicians http://www.bvnpt.ca.gov/[font=cgtimes]
    [font=cgtimes-bold]2866
    . applicant's qualifications. http://www.bvnpt.ca.gov/pdf/vnregs.pdf




    [font=cgtimes]
    an applicant for a licensed vocational nurse license shall comply with each of the following:


    (a) be at least 17 years of age.

    (b) have successfully completed at least an approved course of study through the 12th grade or the equivalent thereof as specified by the board.

    (c) have successfully completed the prescribed course of study in an accredited school of vocational nursing or have graduated from a school which, in the opinion of the board, maintains and gives a course which is equivalent to the minimum requirements for an accredited school of vocational nursing in this state.

    (d) not be subject to denial of licensure under section 480. (amended by stats. 1990, ch. 520.)





    [font=cgtimes-bold]
    2873. equivalency to graduation from accredited school.






    [font=cgtimes]
    any person possessing either the education or the experience, or any combination of both the education and the experience, equivalent to that acquired in an accredited school of vocational nursing may be licensed as avocational nurse under the provisions of this chapter, provided that he successfully demonstrates to the board that he possesses the necessary qualifications, and successfully passes such examinations or tests as may from time to time berequired by the board. (amended by stats. 1969, ch. 527.)






    [font=cgtimes-bold]
    2873.5. effect of service in military medical corps. (pg 7)






    [font=cgtimes]
    any person who has served on active duty in the medical corps of any of the armed forces, in which no less than an aggregate of 12 months was spent in rendering bedside patient care, and who has completed the basic course ofinstruction in nursing required by his or her particular branch of the armed forces, and whose service in the armed forces has been under honorable conditions, or whose general discharge has been under honorable conditions, shall be granted a license upon proof that he or she possesses the necessary qualifications of this section, as set forth in his or her service records, and upon his or her passing an examination. (amended by stats. 1972, ch. 109; 1994 ch. 1275.








    [font=cgtimes-bold]
    2881. requirements for accreditation. pg 12

    [font=cgtimes]an accredited school of vocational nursing is one which has been approved by the board of vocational nursing and psychiatric technicians, gives a course of instruction in vocational nursing of not less than 1530 hours or 50 semester units approved by the board pursuant to section 2882 whether the same be established by the state boardof education, other educational institutions, or other public or private agencies or institutions and is affiliated or conducted in connection with one or more hospitals.
    one hour of instruction for purposes of computing the total hours of instruction or for calculating semester units as specified in this section shall consist of not less than 50 minutes of actual class time. (amended by stats.1985, ch. 36; 1997 ch. 759.)







    [font=cgtimes-bold]
    article 4. licenses pg 22






    [font=cgtimes-bold]
    see 2516. eligibility for licensure.


    lpn application:
    method #4 - military applicants (915 kb)
    live scan fingerprint forms (565 kb) - required with method #4




    this method requires no less than 12 months of active duty bedside patient care on a hospital ward, completion of the basic course of instruction in nursing while in the armed forces and proof that service has been honorable.
    ------------


    california rn regs:
    sbon http://www.rn.ca.gov/

    nursing practice act

    a military applicant who has met the qualifications set forth in section 2736.5 of the code and who has completed a course of instruction that provided the knowledge and skills necessary to function in accordance with the minimum standards for competency set forth in section 1443.5 and that contained the theoretical content and clinical experience specified in section 1426(c)(1) through (e)(7) is determined to have completed the course of instruction prescribed by the board for licensure.
    1443.5. standards of competent performance



    2736.5. qualifications of persons serving in medical corps of armed forces; records and reports




    [font=newcenturyschlbk-roman]
    (a) any person who has served on active duty in the medical corps of any of the armed forces of the united states and who has successfully completed the course of instruction required to qualify him for rating as a medical service technician--independent duty, or other equivalent rating in his particular branch of the armed forces, and whose service in the armed forces has been under honorable conditions, may submit the record of such training to the board for evaluation.


    (b) if such person meets the qualifications of paragraphs (1) and (3) of subdivision (a) of section 2736, and if the board determines that his education and experience would give reasonable assurance of competence to practice as a registered nurse in this state, he shall be granted a license upon passing the standard examination for such licensure.

    (c) the board shall, by regulation, establish criteria for evaluating the education and experience of applicants under this section.

    (d) the board shall maintain records of the following categories of applicants under this section:





    [font=newcenturyschlbk-roman]
    (1) applicants who are rejected for examination, and the areas of such applicants' preparation which are the causes of rejection.


    (2) applicants who are qualified by their military education and experience alone to take the examination, and the results of their examinations.

    (3) applicants who are qualified to take the examination by their military education and experience plus supplementary education, and the results oftheir examinations.

    (e) the board shall attempt to contact by mail or other means individuals meeting the requirements of subdivision (a) who have been or will be discharged or separated from the armed forces of the united states, in order to inform them of the application procedure provided by this section. the board may enter into an agreement with the federal government in order to secure the names and addresses of such individuals.
    http://www.rn.ca.gov/npa/pdf/b-p.pdf


    application for licensure by examination


    --------------------

    ny law re lpn's:
    http://assembly.state.ny.us/leg/?cl=30&a=133

    s 6906. requirements for a license as a licensed practical nurse. to
    qualify for a license as a licensed practical nurse, an applicant shall
    fulfill these requirements:
    (1) application: file an application with the department;
    (2) education: have received an education including completion of high
    school or its equivalent, and have completed a program in practical
    nursing, in accordance with the commissioner`s regulations, or
    completion of equivalent study satisfactory to the department in a
    program conducted by the armed forces of the united states or in an
    approved program in professional nursing;
    (3) experience: meet no requirement as to experience;
    (4) examination: pass an examination satisfactory to the board and in
    accordance with the commissioner`s regulations, provided, however, that
    the educational requirements set forth in subdivision two of this
    section are met prior to admission for the licensing examination;
    (5) age: be at least seventeen years of age;
    (6) citizenship: meet no requirements as to united states citizenship;
    (7) character: be of good moral character as determined by the
    department; and
    (8) fees: pay a fee of one hundred fifteen dollars to the department
    for admission to a department conducted examination and for an initial
    license, a fee of forty-five dollars for each reexamination, a fee of
    seventy dollars for an initial license for persons not requiring
    admission to a department conducted examination, and a fee of fifty
    dollars for each triennial registration period.





    [font=courier new]

    pa practical nurse law
    section 5. fee; qualifications of applications.-no application for licensure as a licensed practical nurse shall be considered unless accompanied by a fee determined by the board by regulation. every applicant for examination as a licensed practical nurse shall furnish evidence satisfactory to the board that he or she is eighteen years of age or over, is a citizen of the united states or has legally declared intention to become such, is of good moral character, has completed at least twelve years of education with diploma in public, parochial or private school, or its equivalent as evaluated by the department of education; and has satisfactorily completed a program in practical nursing prescribed and approved by the board in a school, hospital or other educational institution, of not less than fifteen hundred hours and within a period of not less than twelve months, or has completed a program considered by the board to be equal to that required in this commonwealth atthe time such program was completed. http://www.dos.state.pa.us/bpoa/lib/...0/10/pnact.pdf

    Last edit by NRSKarenRN on Mar 16, '05

close