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Popular Content

Showing content with the highest Reactions since 01/21/2020 in all areas

  1. 45 points
    This article was written by someone who wishes to remain anonymous. Due to the topic and emotionally charged nature of the article, the member wanted the topic out in the open so nurses could discuss it. Because she is afraid of retribution if any of her hospital administrative staff should read this article and link it back to her, we offered to publish it for her anonymously. Please add your comments regarding this issue negatively impacting nurses and the healthcare system. COVID-19 is here and it is terrifying. People are scared. People are panicking. I have seen posts that criticize nurses who choose not to work right now because they are afraid. “This is what YOU signed up for!” people say. That is not true. This is NOT what we signed up for. NOBODY has signed up for this. Unlike what you might have seen on TV, there are many different types of nurses and we all have different skills. We specialize in our own fields. The Renal nurse knows how to educate patients who are in renal failure about fluid and dietary restrictions, so they do no overload their systems. She understands shunts and dialysis equipment. For the patient in renal failure, she is an expert. The Cardiac nurse knows how to take care of patients who have just had open-heart surgery. She can read an EKG expertly. She may not know how to connect a patient to a dialysis machine, but for cardiac patients, she is an expert. The Labor and Delivery nurse can check your cervix to tell when it’s time to push. She can read fetal monitoring strips to make sure your baby is not in distress during labor. She may not be an expert at reading EKGs, but for a laboring mom, she is an expert. The ICU nurse takes care of the most fragile patients. She understands ventilator settings, arterial pressure readings, blood gas readings. Drugs that most wards will never see – like Levophed are used here. She cannot check your cervix, but for a critical patient, she is a lifesaver. Each of these nurses (and oh so many more different types of nurses!) are experts in their fields. They “signed up” to care for those patients. They have trained and educated themselves to care for their specific patients. That is why if you are in labor, you want a labor nurse, not a renal nurse, at your bedside. Right now, ALL NURSES, regardless of specialty, are being called to care for COVID patients. Please bear in mind that not ALL nurses have been trained to deal with highly infectious patients who have the potential to go into acute respiratory distress quickly. We are NOT being offered additional training. This is part of the reason nurses are terrified. This is why some nurses are leaving nursing right now. This is definitely NOT what they “signed up for.” For the most part, nurses take care of people who are ill or injured with non-communicable illnesses or injuries like cancer, heart disease, strokes, car accidents, etc. This means we can help without the risk of catching our patient’s illness or injury. We do take care of patients with infectious illnesses as well – the flu, pneumonia, etc. Because these patients do not take up a large part of our hospital normally, we have the appropriate respirators, reverse-air flow rooms, and PPE we need to take care of these patients. These patients are usually on appropriate wards with nurses who have been trained to care for them. Although there is a risk when we take care of these patients, there are also vaccines and known treatments to help us fight if we get infected. COVID-19 IS DIFFERENT. IT IS A HIGHLY INFECTIOUS, POTENTIALLY FATAL VIRUS WITH NO KNOWN CURE OR TREATMENT. Because it is a PANDEMIC, many people are sick at the same time. Hospitals are overwhelmed. Patients are being sent to wards where nurses do not have the correct expertise to care for them. Hospitals do not have the appropriate equipment to help keep their nurses SAFE while we are caring for patients. There are not enough masks. Nurses are being asked to wear bandanas or sew their own masks at home! Would YOU walk into a potentially infected person’s room and care for them with a bandana? So please. STOP. STOP saying “Nurses signed up for this.” We did not. We did not sign up to sacrifice ourselves because hospitals won’t provide us with the proper equipment and training we need. We did not sign up to die of an infectious disease just because “it’s your job!” Do you want a labor nurse trying her best to ‘figure out’ how to operate a ventilator for your child? Do you want a cardiac nurse delivering your daughter’s baby? Do you want a wound care nurse to try and figure out your dialysis settings? No. I promise - you don’t. We understand you need us, but our families need us too. If we are scared right now, it’s because we have every damned reason to be terrified. If some nurses choose to stay home and protect their families, that is their priority. They have a right to protect their own life. No JOB is worth anyone’s life
  2. 22 points
    Try anyway. Living the way you describe is more daunting.
  3. 22 points
    When was the last time that political leadership made compliance with public health recommendations during a pandemic seem like a partisan exercise? That's why the clinical side is now mired in politics.
  4. 21 points
  5. 19 points
    Only ONE party in the US is causing such discord over centuries use of infection control practices used during a pandemic: stay home as much as possible, minimize gatherings, wear a mask when outside home and unable to maintain social distance, wash your hands often, especially upon returning home. Those communities that fail to understand/follow-thru suffer the fate my beloved Philadelphia area went through in 1918. I know which 2020 presidential candidate wears a mask when out in public supporting public health efforts to control COVID-19 spread and prevent death of citizens ---- and which one is having mass rallies greater than 25 people. I've known of Dr. Fauci, following his medical advice since early 80's while caring for AIDS patients. In 1990, my Alma Mater Neumann College bestowed on him an honorary Doctor of Science degree. So Faucisim has survived many decades. https://learn.neumann.edu/news/neumann-honored-Dr-anthony-fauci-in-1990
  6. 19 points
    I would argue that it depends on what kind of NP you want to be. PMHNP has a shortage and pays well, for example. It’s true that if you wait a long time to become a NP you may not make much more $$ but not if you’re only a few years in. I made about $75k as a RN in the NICU in 2014 and my first job as a NNP I got paid $95k. Now my base salary is $160k, much more than I’d ever make as a RN. But there’s also lifestyle to consider as well. I’m less stressed out as a provider than as a nurse. This may seem ironic, but in the provider role I’m cushioned from the daily stresses of being “on” with parents my entire shift (I love talking with parents but some parents can be a bit draining and spending 30 minutes with one set is different than spending 12 hours with them), don’t have to ask permission to go to the bathroom, and it’s nice to have my own office to have some downtime. Plus I get much better parking and my paid time off is at the top of the accrual scale versus if I was a nurse I’d have to wait 10 years to get to that accrual. As far as the school goes, you need to do your research and go to a reputable school. I chose a brick and mortar one that fully arranged my clinical sites. I think it’s downright criminal that schools take student money and then don’t set up clinical sites for them.
  7. 19 points
    Put politely? Utter rubbish playing on people's fears for profit. Refutation by an oncologist in Michigan who debunks Bad Science Made Popular By Social Media https://respectfulinsolence.com/2020/05/06/judy-mikovits-pandemic/?fbclid=IwAR0it2AuzPmMjFFsLaQmwUMA2LhJDsJa_KH9wm_WL1GcEkbJgBNPsugByXk
  8. 19 points
    I had multiple people tell me how hard CRNA school was and how "nobody" can do it. I received a bachelors of science in Exercise and Wellness, while playing football at a D1 school. I was on a full scholarship for football and my grades didn't end up being the best- I had a 3.0 After I graduated I knew I wanted to be in the healthcare field, but did not have the grades for medical school. I thought about PA school but it didn't seem like the right fit for me. My wife helped me research and we found CRNA jobs and it sounded just up my alley. I went to do an accelerated nursing program to become an RN with a BSN and I received a 3.8GPA. I then was hired on into an ICU Nuero-shock-trauma unit where I worked for almost 3 years. I have a wife and 3 kids, and I continued to work hard. I retook classes I didn't do well in while getting my undergrad degree, and also took the GRE and all other required classes and received A's in them. I applied to two CRNA schools the first year and was waitlisted at one, but then the next year got into 2 of the schools I applied to, and TCU is where I picked, and I have to say it was one of the greatest moments. I am in my last year doing my clinical residency and will graduate in January. I am here to prove that if you want it bad enough, and you work hard enough you can achieve it. I had a lot of friends who laughed when I told them this plan years ago, thinking me and my family were crazy for doing this, but now I'm starting to interview for jobs and I can say this was the right choice for me and I absolutely love this career. Message me if you have any questions. I wanted someone to read this to know that they can do it! Believe in yourself. I also have a 4.0 currently. Just because you didn't do great in your under grad, doesn't mean you can't become a CRNA.
  9. 18 points
    In my opinion, the nurse who should have been let go is the lazy PACU nurse who "didn't want to" apply the wound vac. You know, the one trained to do it. I think the "lazy nurse" had every right to refuse to stick around a couple hours until the patient got out of surgery to do a job that wasn't her responsibility. It sounds like she wasn't on call for the PACU, so why should she wait around to do sometime else's job. I would definitely think about quitting too if I were being punished with a 14 hour call shift.
  10. 18 points
    i had a 2 k students come in - one crying and BURNING up. I send child 2 to get child 1's backpack and coat, which she does. As Child 2 is leaving, she looks at child 1, still crying, and asks me " Are you sure you can handle this?" I was dying!! 😆
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