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  1. JKL33

    JKL33

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  2. Jedrnurse

    Jedrnurse, BSN, RN

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    Has 28 years experience. Specializes in school nurse.


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  3. NRSKarenRN

    NRSKarenRN, BSN, RN

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    Has 43 years experience. Specializes in Vents, Telemetry, Home Care, Home infusion.


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  4. Davey Do

    Davey Do

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Popular Content

Showing content with the highest Reactions since 10/29/2020 in all areas

  1. 15 points
    I’m in a different country but it’s the same here. The nurses in the ambulances have standing orders for all the various medications that they have accessible to them. It’s an ambulance after all, not an entire pharmacy. For the meds they carry, they basically follow the the formula of: if conditions a, b and c are met, administer x mg of drug y. I’m not downplaying the work they do, but as an anesthetist I’m not super impressed by the fact that paramedics can administer medications after they’ve made their assessment. What I am impressed by is the fact that they work under conditions that are more challenging than a hospital. They have to consider scene safety, be it violence or potential hazardous materials at an accident site. They have to work outdoors in inclement weather and in poor lighting. There’s heavy lifting and sometimes having to work in cramped quarters. They have limited resources and less support at their disposal compared to a trauma hospital. So yes, I value the job they do. But I don’t see anything positive coming out of OP’s post with its anecdotal claim that being a paramedic is ten times more demanding than being a nurse is. I don’t believe it’s true and I frankly think the 10x is a bit dumb. What’s perceived as difficult and challenging to each one of us, in my opinion has very much to do with our own personal strengths and weaknesses.
  2. 8 points
    first no N-95 masks for RNs in the beginning of the pandemic and now take away our chairs and ability to chart and rest for a few minutes..... Pathetic really and embarrassing that any professional would accept this type of treatment, we need to do something. Unacceptable.
  3. 7 points
    Part time and per diem jobs typically only hire nurses with experience in that particular area. Orientation is literally two days on my unit for per diem staff. A second job probably comes with mandatory staff meetings, holiday requirements and other things that will have to fit in with your main job. The best way to make extra money involves overtime in your unit. Time and a half is the way to go. If the night and/or weekend differentials are good, pick a weekend night overtime shift. Find out if there are similar stepdown units you would be able to pick up extra shifts in if there are no overtime opportunities there. My hospital pays critical staffing pay for units really short-staffed, and a nurse can pick up a critical staffing bonus on top of all the overtime and shift differentials.
  4. 7 points
    STAFF.IS.THE.HARDEST.PART.OF.THIS. JOB
  5. 6 points
    If stupidity could be used in lieu of fossil fuels there'd be no global warming.
  6. 6 points
    This doesn't have anything to do with HIPAA whatsoever. Because it has nothing to do with a patient or anyone that any of you treated. There is no "patient" and there is no "PHI" [Protected Health Information] involved. Period. I don't know what a "Dep" is in this context (deputy?) but I suggest you completely ignore people who don't know what they're talking about and are not your superiors. If anyone important (an actual superior of yours) mentions this incorrect train of thought to you, I would take a "professionally assertive" stance (good posture, good eye contact, normal/calm/serious vocal tone) and say "This is inappropriate. This scenario does not involve a patient and it does not involve any 'PHI' and has nothing to do with HIPAA." Don't talk too much. Deliver your information and be serious about it.
  7. 6 points
    Getting old is normal and it comes to us all. Don't panic about it - enjoy youth while you have it. Once it's gone you will have other priorities and other pleasures. I'm 57 and I LOVE life!
  8. 6 points
    I worked as a Nurse from 1984 to 2020 and thought, "What would I say to myself coming and going?"
  9. 5 points
    I was just going to ask if your employer has an EAP. Ours has specific counseling for pandemic-related worries. If that is not an option, I have found talking to the other nurses in my district (and other school nurses in my area) to have been really helpful. I am lucky enough that the nurses in my district meet weekly and are in contact via email even more regularly. We also get to attend a bi-monthly zoom meeting with the local PH nurses and other school nurses in our county. It's a good place to voice frustrations, hear solutions from other schools, and the like (and since the PH nurses are on, its a great resource, too). It might be difficult to organize, but perhaps you could send some emails and make some phone calls to other schools to see if that kind of forum would be helpful/welcome... Our little sub is also a great place to vent. I think a lot of us are in your shoes and just feeling overwhelmed, and we would love to be a virtual shoulder to lean on...
  10. 5 points
    If you are given an opportunity at the med surg floor, then take it! I was once in a job that I hated and was miserable and kept trying to make it work. Short story - a miserable job often doesn’t improve and if you have another job opportunity, then go for it! The grass actually can be greener or even a different shade of green.....in other words.....sometimes any improvement is better than none.
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