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  1. JKL33

    JKL33

    Platinum Members


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      436

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      4,744


  2. Jedrnurse

    Jedrnurse, BSN, RN

    Platinum Members

    Has 28 years experience. Specializes in school nurse.


    • Points

      385

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      1,981


  3. NRSKarenRN

    NRSKarenRN, BSN, RN

    Guides

    Has 43 years experience. Specializes in Vents, Telemetry, Home Care, Home infusion.


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      295

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      15,965


  4. Davey Do

    Davey Do

    Platinum Members


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      290

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      6,998


Popular Content

Showing content with the highest Reactions since 10/28/2020 in all areas

  1. 17 points
    Whoa there, not need to engage in name calling especially since @caliotter3 is a well established member of this forum and gives sound and sensible advice to many. Plus you cannot make a post as devisive as yours was and then pick and choose how people will answer you. It is the nature of public forums that they be uncensored. There are many places where discussions about politics and religion as well as race and gender relations do not belong. Just as you commented that you have to endure pictures of people's children and graduation pics etc. You are not required to endure anything! If you express polite disinterest people will stop subjecting you to them. This is what we mean by keeping one's head down and doing one's job. If you want to advocate for the rights of any group you have to assess your audience first. The fact that you are a travel nurse on temporary assignment means that it doesn't matter what people think of you as you will be gone when your contract ends and the regular staff will remain. You are not going to change how anyone thinks by trying to force them to think the way you do. As my daddy used to say... "You can lead a horse to water and you can shove that horses head in the water but you can't make him drink it and will more likely end up covered in water and horse snot." I admire what you are trying to do just not your methods. When I am trying to convice someone about something I first try to understand where they are coming from then adjust my argument to bring about the results I want. It is no more okay for you to discuss your gender identity in the workplace than it would be for me to discuss mine. BTW not all boomers are are racist or xenophobic - I have seen such thoughts and words come from millennials, Gen X and Gen Z. Hppy
  2. 14 points
    Two quick impressions: Once your feelings have settled a little bit, reflect on why you were let go and see if you can gain any insight/learn anything from the experience. Don't jump into another job super quickly just because it's a job. The idea of an 8 week program in "any specialty" without pay sounds really shady...
  3. 7 points
    Allnurses School Nursing forum members recommend 2-5 years hospital nursing experience prior to accepting school nurse position. It is a niche specialty with own rules and regs which vary by federal and state education department regs along with each school district policies. Please spend some time in that forum before you make a decision. Agree, without any hospital/ LTAC, SNF experience you are limiting future career options.
  4. 7 points
    Stay calm. "I've already done my assessment and spoken with the physician. I'm not doing that and I'm not going to argue about this." I mean this kindly: Reread what you wrote about your care of this patient: 1) see resident daily 2) know norms 3) recognize abnormality 4) inform physician 5) participate in decision-making that result in decision for further eval. You did exactly what you were supposed to do. Therefore, it doesn't matter who stood there arguing with you, it doesn't have to "make you feel" the way you felt. This other individual doesn't know what they're talking about. Their ignorance does not dictate your emotions--you do! End of story. 👍🏽 I would not entertain this in the slightest. Carry yourself with purpose, speak concisely. When EMS arrives, hustle to the room with the paperwork, introduce yourself like a professional and make good eye contact; give them your brief and decisive-sounding report. Ask if they have any questions (common courtesy, good patient care). If at that point the reply is push-back like, "well he's satting good now" you say, "Yep. He's on 15 liters of oxygen." Any more malarkey after that is when you say, "I've spoken with the physician and I'm not arguing with you about this." Lastly, when you have made this statement then don't just stand there passively as if you are going to entertain more foolishness. Move away - either out the door of the room, a few steps down the hall or back to the nurses station or whatever is appropriate for the patient scenario. Your confidence will increase with time but you must work on emotional control so that you don't have a self esteem crisis due to someone's ignorant and/or lazy foolishness. 👍🏽🙂
  5. 6 points
    The following is for a school assignment for my RN-BSN. I wrote this and realized how tired I am, especially from the year 2020. Anyone else have similar thoughts? Let me know! There have been misconceptions about nurses over the years whether it was mocking us about using “a doctor’s stethoscope” in 2015 on The View, the commonly worn provocative nurse costume, or when a Senator suggested that we play cards most of the day. The thing is, you do not see what we really do until you are a patient, have a family member in the hospital, or walk in our shoes. As a patient you see me bringing you medications in a cup, you see me connecting your IV to fluids, antibiotics, or blood products. You see me helping you get up in the chair, taking you to the bathroom, or getting back in bed. I take your vitals and record them, I change your dressing on your wounds, I bathe you, and clean you when your incontinent. I turn you every two hours to prevent you from getting a pressure injury. I check your sugar and bring you insulin. I also bring you snacks or a drink and take out your trash from the room. I bring you pain medication to try to provide you with comfort and relief. I do all these things while also talking to you about your illness or talking about your life stories. I listen to your travel stories and put that place in the back of my mind for a vacation. More recently, you see me wearing a gown, gloves, two different masks, shoe covers, and a face shield. You can see our eyes but not our smiles when we laugh with you. Yet you still call us nurses beautiful. What you do not see us doing in the room is advocating for you to the doctors, when we know something is going wrong. You do not see that we watch your labs, read the scans that you have had done, and read the progress notes from the entire team taking care of you. We document everything about you, from a minor skin tear, how many times you have used the bathroom, to how much you have had to drink throughout the shift. We do this for you and our other patients we are taking care of that shift. You do not see us grabbing everything we need to take in one room before putting on all the protective wear. You do not see that another patient passed away and we perform post-mortem care on them before coming to your room to assist you. You do not see how tired we are after the end of the shift; you do not see the tears in our eyes while driving home. You do not know that we think about you at times when no longer taking care of you, wondering how you are doing, if you are getting better or worse. You don't see us doing any of these things, but just know, we are here for you and the caring never stops.
  6. 6 points
    I think we all agree on the fact that polarizing topics are best left out of social interactions for the very fact it can trigger strong responses from people who don't necessarily conform to our way of thinking. That's the climate in this country right now. I, however, do not agree that gay people should hold back their "coming out" to co-workers until they have established some sort of rapport or friendship. A mere expression of one's "gayness" should not trigger the kind of reaction the OP got, ever, in any type of conversation. That's not a gray area for me.
  7. 6 points
    There are nurses who go directly into school nursing, and do it well. But I think they are few and far between. It sounds like this job would have you overseeing other experienced nurses, which can be a great learning process for you, but I'm not sure it is fair to them. They will be turning to you for practice and policy questions and concerns. Having been a school nurse for 27 years now (and an RN for almost 38) I feel that I have the understanding of this job but I am a firm believer in we don't know what we don't know. I would not recommend this role, and think you should have a few years at least as a nurse, preferably a school nurse, before you take a leadership role.
  8. 6 points
    I would consider waiting, especially if you're already giving a four week notice. Where did the worry about delays come from? Is that strictly from your own mind, or have you seen worrying signs from the facility?
  9. 5 points
    The majority children who have tested positive for COVID at my school have not had any respiratory symptoms. Most had no symptoms (tested due to exposure), GI symptoms, or headache. Only two have had respiratory symptoms.
  10. 5 points
    100% yes. Even on the weekends I'm stretched thin. Spent a couple hours contact tracing Sunday morning while also trying to complete a project for a class I'm taking and trying to clean my house. My husband, seeing how stressed I've been, bought a roomba so we'd have one less chore. I was outrunning the very noisy roomba every time I got a phone call from a parent or our principal. Had to laugh.
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