Jump to content

language requirement

Nurses   (3,186 Views 32 Comments)
by kvdlr kvdlr (Member)

1,881 Visitors; 33 Posts

advertisement

I mean no offense to any particular individual, race, group, or ethnicity. I was just curious how the rest of you feel regarding the language requirement when applying for jobs (i.e. Spanish/English, Chinese/English, etc. is required or must).

Isn't this some sort of discrimination in a way? Please correct me if I'm wrong. I know not all can speak or are comfortable speaking in English, but aren't they suppose to adapt instead of us feeling the need to learn another language. I am bilingual myself, and I honestly feel very uncomfortable speaking in English when I know that I am speaking to someone who share the language as mine -it's a cultural thing. I think the job requirement should be English is a must since this is the majority language of the nation, and Spanish/Chinese/etc. are a plus but NOT a requirement when applying for jobs.

Anyway, just a thought I wanna share and would like to hear opinions from others as well. Thanks!

P.S.

I mean no offense to ANYONE, or try to stir up an issue.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

klone has 13 years experience as a MSN, RN and specializes in Women's Health/OB Leadership.

3 Followers; 113,884 Visitors; 13,161 Posts

1) There is no official language in the US. Until that happens, there will be no requirement for all people to speak or adapt to a specific language

2) The requirement or strong preference for staff to speak a certain language is out of cultural sensitivity to the clientele. It's only a GOOD thing if we can actually deliver healthcare and teaching to our pts in the language they understand.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1 Follower; 44,494 Visitors; 3,042 Posts

Thank you klone, I wish we could clone you. You have said it all, maybe we should close the discussion now!!!!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

klone has 13 years experience as a MSN, RN and specializes in Women's Health/OB Leadership.

3 Followers; 113,884 Visitors; 13,161 Posts

Thank you klone, I wish we could clone you. You have said it all, maybe we should close the discussion now!!!!!!

Wow, thanks. :-)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

2,921 Visitors; 100 Posts

We have a translator service that helps. You call the service and can put the pt/parent/client whatever on speaker phone. The interpretation is done for you.

We have a lot of Spanish speaking people in our area as well as others due to a University. I'm just too old to pick up a second language. I'm lucky to speak a few words of Spanish.

A lot of people, including physicians think it's a hassle to use the service, but when I want to get my point across or my teaching I do it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

BluegrassRN has 14 years experience.

21,553 Visitors; 1,188 Posts

I'm learning Spanish right now, as I feel I need it. I speak a couple of languages, but nothing useful in my area (other than English).

I guess I don't look at is as "whether they should learn the language or not" sort of situation. It's a *fact* that a lot of people in my area are Spanish speakers who don't speak adequate English for whatever reason. Just like it's a *fact* that a lot of my patients are chronic COPDers who smoke. Or are diabetics who don't manage their sugars well. *shrug* I continue to provide care for those people, who don't do some very simple modifications to alleviate or avoid their health problems, their choice. Why should I be angry about the Spanish speakers who, for whatever reason (choice or no) don't speak English?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

7,154 Visitors; 460 Posts

The predominant language spoken by patient need, determines the predominant language requirement of the staff.

This is true worldwide.

What we are seeing here with this issue in the U.S., is a struggle of ethnic identity disguised as a communication issue.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

7,154 Visitors; 460 Posts

1) There is no official language in the US. Until that happens, there will be no requirement for all people to speak or adapt to a specific language

.

My reply to this quote was in error

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

klone has 13 years experience as a MSN, RN and specializes in Women's Health/OB Leadership.

3 Followers; 113,884 Visitors; 13,161 Posts

Deleted, as the previous post was in error

:)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

4,852 Visitors; 125 Posts

From my experience, with someone who speaks the language who works in the medical field, it also build trust with client. Clients are able to ask questions so they can fully understand what is going on, etc.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

7,154 Visitors; 460 Posts

See post # 7

Edited by Flying ICU RN

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

6,302 Visitors; 517 Posts

So you're arguing that English is, in fact, the official language of the US? It is not. There *is* no official language, regardless of whatever language the citizenship exam is in.

Several states have declared or even had public elections to make English the official language of the state. But, true, the U.S. as a country does not state English as the official language.

However, the USCIS states there is an English language requirement but there are exceptions made for the Civics test if one qualifies to test in their native language.

There are hospitals that openly advertise for bilingual health care providers of all types. They generally word it as "preferred" but given the area it is understood that means required. I have worked several shifts without speaking English to either staff or patients.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Recently Browsing 0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×