just want to ask..

Posted

Hallo! just wanted to ask, if you're a licensed Nurse (esp. in NYC) and if you have a background experience of working as a CNA, will that help you in applying for a job in hospitals (not nursing homes)? or no? A relative of mine, a nurse, told me that during her orientation, the trainee said the experience u get from there is irrelevant and just forget about it coz it is a different field of work. I'm just curious to know.

netglow, ASN, RN

4,412 Posts

Used to be worthwhile. Years ago, if you worked as a CNA on the floor, and they all knew you were going to nursing school, you would be able to do more nursing duties alongside a nurse, and if you picked up things well, and were well liked, you could expect a job on passing boards (also less worrying about legalities then). These days, since nobody really cares about anybody, you pretty much just stay in the feed/clean/potty the patient mode. Sometimes you can get considered for RN jobs, but it's much less likely than it used to be.

JaneyW

JaneyW

Specializes in Perinatal, Education. Has 9 years experience. 640 Posts

I am hearing from my students--current and former--that the 'foot in the door' of being a CNA or lab tech or unit secretary or whatever is extremely helpful in today's new grad job market.

Jenni811

Jenni811, RN

Specializes in Intermediate care. Has 3 years experience. 1,032 Posts

I can tell you now (eventhought im not from NY) that CNA work anywhere looks very very good. I worked as a CNA through nursing school and it has taught me so incredibly much because i'll tell you this.....Patient Care is half of what you do in nursing. It is not a completley different field. When you become a CNA you really learn good patient care, how to talk with patients. You also really learn by watching nurses and how they react to situations. Because when your a nurse there is going to be times when your patient is going through DT's or is having Chest pain or whatever the situation maybe...and by seeing them, you'll see how they deal with it. Patient care is very important!!! You'll learn how to do all different types of bed baths, mouth care etc. If you are a CNA in the hospital you'll learn how to do mouth care on someone that has an ET Tube and an NG tube??? You learn that basic stuff that will help you SO much more in nursing and in nursing school.

I was SOOO much more ahead in nursing school because i had CNA experience in a hospital.

I'm not saying CNA experience in a nursing home isnt good, because it is! Any experience is excellent.

It looks really good on a resume as well, it gets you "in" to the hospital system. The hospital i worked as a CNA had 8 job postings for nurses when i applied, but they were "internal only" meaning they will only hire you if you already work for them. and ALOT of hospitals function that way. If you work for them while you are in school you are much more likely to get a job with them than if you didnt work for them.

Jenni811

Jenni811, RN

Specializes in Intermediate care. Has 3 years experience. 1,032 Posts

Used to be worthwhile. Years ago, if you worked as a CNA on the floor, and they all knew you were going to nursing school, you would be able to do more nursing duties alongside a nurse, and if you picked up things well, and were well liked, you could expect a job on passing boards (also less worrying about legalities then). These days, since nobody really cares about anybody, you pretty much just stay in the feed/clean/potty the patient mode. Sometimes you can get considered for RN jobs, but it's much less likely than it used to be.

I agree with half this :-D when i was a CNA and the nurses knew i was in nursing school, they would grab me to do things with them. "Hey Jenni im hanging an IV, want to do this with me?" or "Im going to insert a foley. want to be my second pair of hands?"

Imagine going into nursing school learning how to hang primary and secondary IV's and you've already done it.... (With nurses supervision of course!!) :nurse:

Clearly they know how to hang IV's and do Foleys themselves, but its the fact they took a few minutes out of their day to teach me that really made a difference. I was the only sophomore in my nursing class that knew how to hang blood...i impressed the professors.

shortscrubbs108

shortscrubbs108

Specializes in Pulmonology Clinic. Has 2 years experience. 67 Posts

I found being a CNA/PCA extremely helpful! It's not a different field (not to offend the person who said that, but that doesn't make sense) being a nurse aid, even 2 years ago, I learned so much working along side the nurses. I was lucky too, because the nurses I worked with were always taking me with them and showing how they did things. Of course I never started IVs or anything, but just watching is helpful.

Also, I think any work experience will help get a job, because your perspective employer can find out some important info, such as attendance, and attitude with patients and coworkers.

Of course, I don't live in NYC, this is just my opinion based on my own experience.

evolvingrn

evolvingrn, BSN, RN

Specializes in Hospice. 1,035 Posts

I would not have been hired without my experience as a cna.

RNperdiem

RNperdiem, RN

Has 14 years experience. 4,542 Posts

In my unit, new graduates are uncommon. All the new grads we have hired have worked in our unit before as CNA's or secretaries.

There is no guarantees on getting a job, but building a network of professional contacts can only help you.

Of course, if you are a CNA with a bad reputation, that is another matter.

LoveMyBugs, BSN, CNA, RN

Specializes in Pediatrics. 1,316 Posts

I guess it really depends on the area. I am in the Pacific Northwest

For me it did not help to get the job, but it has helped on the job.

Where I worked as a CNA in the hospital they decided last year that they were not going to hire any new grads at all, because it was the ED.

When I went on a couple of interviews for LTC they saw I was a CNA in the ED, did my preceptorship in the ED and then asked me if I had ACLS and PALS, to which they decided that I would not stick around in LTC and did not hire me.

I eventually was hired in a busy SNF/rehab and having worked in the busy enviornment of the ED, I was used to the non stop pace that the nurse has to keep up.

The CNAs I worked with last night complemented me at how calm I am and that having the nurse stay calm made their shift easier.

I have had classmates of mine who have also worked as CNAs for years in a hospital system, not get hired into the units that they worked at as well.

One worked for 15 years as a tech, and she had to go to LTC, another he is still working on the floor as a CNA

malicexmirage

malicexmirage

51 Posts

aah thank you so much for all of your answers! I really appreciate it.you know what you helped me create steps/short term goals/something that would be useful towards my career ladder. I could agree that CNA/PCA work is half of what a real Nurse does, but it's a good thing knowing that it is also helpful in other state. I would also consider working in New Jersey though as long as it is not far from NY. Because, right now, I am just waiting for the CGFNS & NYS nursing licensure process (including NCLEX exam) to be completed but it will take me 6-9 months for it to finish. (and i'm hoping to do it in one shot >

thanks again!

classicdame

classicdame, MSN, EdD

Specializes in Hospital Education Coordinator. 2 Articles; 7,255 Posts

remember that the people in HR have no concept of the actual job responsibilities of either CNA or RN, so they do not always look at the experience in the same way we do. Personally I believe the CNA experience should be considered.