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Job Recruiter Help

Students   (192 Views | 5 Replies)
by FutureRN2020 FutureRN2020 (New) New Student

39 Profile Views; 3 Posts

Hello! I am currently a nursing student going into my last semester of nursing school. I received an email from a job recruiter about an RN position. While it's not my "dream" job, I'm not opposed to working in this specific area and I do believe it would be a good fit for me starting off. I am just wondering the best way to reply to a recruiter and if it's too early to start applying to RN positions even though I won't be graduating/certified until May?
Thanks for any help!😊

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MotoMonkey is a BSN, RN and specializes in ED.

226 Posts; 2,860 Profile Views

Is the recruiter local and reputable? Was this communication written specifically to you, or was it a generic email that someone pasted your name onto? As a relatively new nurse I get recruitment emails all the time that are essentially junk mail. Most promise huge sign on bonuses and wonderful working conditions, though you can tell that its really just marketing to get people to reply.

Maybe I am just cynical or pessimistic, but I am always weary about this style of recruitment. I would say that if it seems legitimate to you, still look into the recruiter and facility a bit before you go giving out personal details.

To answer your other question, if you graduate in May, this seems like a decent time to start looking at what jobs are available. If hospitals in your area put on a new grad program, or nurse residency program, this would be a good time to make sure you know when the application cycle opens and closes. It may be a bit too early to start applying for jobs, since the soonest you could be licensed would be around June, depending on when you graduate in May and how quickly your school sends in information to the state so you can get an "authorization to test." Polishing up your resume and coming up with a plan for when and where to apply are all things you should be doing now, and not waiting until graduation.

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Rionoir is a ADN, RN and specializes in Neuro ICU.

600 Posts; 3,430 Profile Views

Can you do an externship during your final semester where you are?  Doing that gave me a great reference to use when I applied to other departments closer to graduation, and I was able to get into a competitive position that was my top choice with no CNA experience.

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3 Posts; 39 Profile Views

@RionoirDuring my final semester, I will have a practicum (which is where a lot of our students get recommendations/jobs). I am hoping that I can get the placement I chose and get a job through it. 😅 I plan on staying here after graduation so, I would like to work at one of the local hospitals 

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3 Posts; 39 Profile Views

@MotoMonkey The email was from a recruiter at a local hospital (one I want to work at), not sure of his reputation. Although I am interested in the unit advertised, I'm not so sure it would be a great start for my nursing career now that I think about it. I have already started looking at local hospitals for available jobs. I am hoping that the recommendation I have will allow me to gain a job on the unit I want.   

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MotoMonkey is a BSN, RN and specializes in ED.

226 Posts; 2,860 Profile Views

16 hours ago, FutureRN2020 said:

@MotoMonkey I am hoping that the recommendation I have will allow me to gain a job on the unit I want.   

I hope so as well!

 

Your thoughts on using the connections you make during your practicum to help secure a job on your unit sound like a good plan. In fact that is exactly how things worked out for me. I was hired onto a unit that does not generally accept new nurses because I had made solid connections and showed my work ethic while there as a student.

It sounds like that recruiter is much more legit than the ones who find there way into my junk mail box. Despite your feelings that it may not be an ideal place to start your career, keep it in mind as you get closer to graduation. Having options for a first job is never a bad thing!

 

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