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Is 6 weeks too long to give resignation notice?

Professionalism   (593 Views 9 Comments)
by TheNoviceNurse TheNoviceNurse (New) New

186 Profile Views; 4 Posts

Hello all,

I'm about to quit my first nursing job. I was hired a year ago as a graduate RN, and I honestly love the place but I received a somewhat unexpected offer to work in a PICU at a neighboring hospital (one of the best in the state), and I have decided to accept the offer. My start date isn't until about 5-6 weeks from now, but is it too soon to give notice? I'm very nervous about this whole ordeal because they hired me as a new grad and I only stayed a year, but I figure if I let them know as soon as possible it might make it easier instead of me waiting until it's two weeks? What has been everyone else's experience in resigning?

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11 Followers; 3,600 Posts; 26,421 Profile Views

Hello -

There a lot of options between 2 weeks and 6 weeks. ūüė¨

This is simply personal opinion, but somewhere just inside the 1-month mark you could speak to your manager in person, offer your pleasantries and submit your resignation letter noting your last day of availability.

IOW, if you are required to give 2 weeks' notice, you could give 3 or between 3-4. That would show you are giving more than the minimum without taking on too much risk upon yourself.

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Nurse SMS has 8 years experience as a MSN, RN and specializes in Critical Care; Cardiac; Professional Development.

4 Followers; 6,005 Posts; 47,646 Profile Views

I would only give that much notice if you can afford to not get a paycheck for that amount of time.

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Pixie.RN has 11 years experience as a MSN, RN, EMT-P and specializes in EMS, ED, Trauma, CNE, CEN, CPEN, TCRN.

7 Followers; 32 Articles; 13,292 Posts; 128,956 Profile Views

What does your employee handbook/policy give as the required notice? I'd give that much.

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mmc51264 has 7 years experience as a ADN, BSN, MSN, RN and specializes in orthopedic; Informatics, diabetes.

2,737 Posts; 38,829 Profile Views

I was told that RNs need to give 30 days notice. I think your facility would appreciate the extra time to find a new hire. It's not like you are leaving because you are unhappy. I did the same, my first job was great, I liked it, but I got an opportunity for my dream job. That is the only reason I left. It you stay professional, it should be fine

 

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DextersDisciple has 6 years experience as a BSN, RN.

271 Posts; 3,704 Profile Views

Are you in a union? If so you may have to give more than 2 weeks in order for them to pay out your full PTO hours. Mine was 4 weeks and I received about 3 weeks worth of pay in PTO. Check your union handbook if you are in one.

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ghillbert has 20 years experience as a MSN, NP and specializes in CTICU.

1 Follower; 3,650 Posts; 41,475 Profile Views

I would give the minimum required. I have given more in a previous job, and lived to regret it as they were mad about it and made my life miserable for the 6 weeks - I would never do it again.

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54 Posts; 1,556 Profile Views

Give only the minimum notice. I have had jobs that terminated immediately upon receiving a notice stating they didn't want anyone working there who didn't want to be working.

6 weeks would be a long time to go without a paycheck. 

As much as you love your old unit and want to be a fair person, now is the time to be a little selfish and do what is best for you. 

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amoLucia specializes in LTC.

5,192 Posts; 45,981 Profile Views

I hope whatever you do (or did) was within the facility's P&P. Give them the minimum due else they could with-hold any accrued benefits, like vacation.

And remember to request your COBRA benefits (healthcare insurance coverage) if you need it.

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