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Is it time to stop? Adult to Neonatal.

NICU   (1,900 Views | 9 Replies)
by Lovelyrn14 Lovelyrn14 (New) New

744 Profile Views; 4 Posts

Just got orientation and extension of orientation was put in due to MED error during orientation-almost reach the patient however, it could cause harm if it reach the patient. My concern is coming from adult critical care world, and going to Neonatal is completely different world. I’m nervous and it’s affecting my performance and my critical thinking is gone. Preceptors are very good though not all, often I get distracted from my main preceptor who just ran me over but it is ok as I’m an orientee, I call it learning. My question is, is it time to stop and go back to adult world? Please help. This is the orientation that I made a mistake and I need insight from nurses. Any advice would help. Thanks. 

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babyNP. has 12 years experience as a APRN and specializes in NICU.

2 Followers; 1,811 Posts; 27,754 Profile Views

Your post reads a bit like a "dear diary" vibe. It's not very focused and rambles on a bit.

If you'd like feedback, you'll need to organize your thoughts a little more, give us more background, and create paragraphs. Think "SBAR"

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4 Posts; 744 Profile Views

 I reconstituted a vial of amp in an oral solution sterile water—supposed to Be using vial of drug diluent in a sterile water. I did not even draw this in a syringe as I knew this doesn’t seems right. I’m new to the unit and preceptor said “dilute in a sterile water, so I came grabbed the unopened sterile water for oral and use it in reconstitution. I’m so distracted and overwhelmed that time with alarms going off etc. also I reprogram the IV pump with wrong ml of syringe but preceptor double checked it. I feel like I’m not fitting in this unit. Please help.

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BeachsideRN has 2 years experience as a ASN and specializes in NICU.

1,720 Posts; 17,068 Profile Views

Take a deep breath and *think* before acting. You are coming from adult nursing and it is way different than NICU. Your actions appear to me to be nerves getting the best of you and acting before thinking. Slow down. Pay attention. 

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158 Posts; 6,675 Profile Views

Getting a bit frazzled when starting somewhere new especially without experience is pretty normal; part of the reason we have preceptors.

 

Remember to take a deep breath and focus on the task at hand.

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Leader25 has 35 years experience.

2 Followers; 910 Posts; 5,025 Profile Views

 Sounds like NICU nerves,it takes a good two years for a nurse to feel comfortable in a NICU,focus on learning ,being accurate,check and double check,if you find your health being affected then I say bye I gave it a good try but it is not for me.Nurses really need to spend time with  normal healthy newborns before working with sick nicu patients.

Good luck 

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BeachsideRN has 2 years experience as a ASN and specializes in NICU.

1,720 Posts; 17,068 Profile Views

21 hours ago, Leader25 said:

 Sounds like NICU nerves,it takes a good two years for a nurse to feel comfortable in a NICU,focus on learning ,being accurate,check and double check,if you find your health being affected then I say bye I gave it a good try but it is not for me.Nurses really need to spend time with  normal healthy newborns before working with sick nicu patients.

Good luck 

10

This is so true. Maybe ask for a few shifts doing well baby assessments if you have a LD unit. That will help you differentiate normal from abnormal. Also, grab a copy of Merenstein's NICU handbook

Edited by OnOn2NICU
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Leader25 has 35 years experience.

2 Followers; 910 Posts; 5,025 Profile Views

On 3/13/2019 at 5:30 PM, BeachsideRN said:

Also, grab a copy of Merenstein's NICU handbook

Very good suggestion,also Gomellas  handbook for ON call emergencies,Core Curriculum , the old Kenner text book,we used to get Pharmacology book free but now it is very expensive but your unit  should have at least one copy, and shall i go on ,ugh no.,....... if anyone is interested in a free  old book PM me.

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7 Posts; 205 Profile Views

Hi, my experience is a little different, but hopefully I can receive some good feedback. Backstory: I came from adult care and was offered a position in PICU. It wasn't a great fit. I was always scared of harming the child, and the parents were a bit intimidating at times. In addition, I came from an adult setting with no experience in peds which made it even more difficult. Currently, I have the opportunity to do NICU , and was told the experience is a bit different. 

On the flip side, I also have an offer for an adult cath lab. This position gives me the opportunity to deal with adults again, but the orientation would be 9 months long :(  Would it make sense to do NICU if I had issues in PICU? My ultimate goal is get into a specialty area!! Any advice will be gladly accepted. 

Thanks in advance 🙂

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prmenrs has 42 years experience as a RN and specializes in NICU, Infection Control.

2 Followers; 4,565 Posts; 32,582 Profile Views

I have often said that neonates are like a whole 'nother species. While some of your ICU skills are useful, your whole ability to look @ a pt. and "know" something is off is just---gone. And, no one should expect you to have that skill for @ least a year or so. They should expect you to say, every once in a while, "look @ this kiddo. Is s/he ok?" to a more experienced nurse. If s/he thinks something's off, ask what they see. 

It takes time. Think while assessing: what am I seeing, and how does it fit? You will get it, and it will feel great. 

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