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Is There A Generational Clash In The Medical Workplace?

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by DoGoodThenGo DoGoodThenGo (Member)

DoGoodThenGo works as a Entrepreneur - Business Owner.

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Oh Yeah! It's not so much that the young nurses put family first.(obviously, i'm an "old" nurse) My family is important to me too. I understand that SOMEONE has to work, off shifts, weekends and holidays! They don't seem to "get" this. They think that they can walk in and tell YOU when they will come to work. I work in ICU's and the "pt care" is really missing. No baths, mouth care, turning, back rubs, educating pts and families. Lots of monitors and drips. We have had NUMEROUS RNS come to an interview with their mothers!? I wouldn't have taken my mother to an interview when i was in high school.

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subee has 45 years experience as a MSN, CRNA and works as a CRNA, retired.

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It's not just nurses. Its in every industry and many large businesses are making moves to accomodate the younger generation. HOWEVER, for us in the 24/7 hospital world, the clash is particularly acute. We had a surgical group looking for a new partner and even newly minted general surgeons were putting limitations on weekends and call! If general surgery doesn't get it, I worry for the future patients who need an 11 p.m. appendectomy. Our parents went through a war and a depression and certainly passed on a different work ethic than we aging hippies passed on to our children. You can't blame them for wanting to work from home in their underwear!

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DoGoodThenGo works as a Entrepreneur - Business Owner.

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Don't know about anyplace else, but here in the NYC/Manhattan area, trying to find a doctor, dentist, etc.. after hours or on a major holiday is like winning the lottery.

Some old school docs still have Saturday office hours, but they are limited, and almost never during a major holiday weekend. Once summer hours hit, you can often forget Saturdays as well (hey it is along drive to the Hamptons, Jersey Shore, ...:D). You can add the Jewish High Holy Days to this list as well.

Indeed calls most any NYC doctor after hours will produce a recording saying "..... if this is urgent, please go to the nearest emergency room". Problem is how is a patient supposed to determine what is "urgent" or not? Often they simply just pack up and go to the ER.

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We have had NUMEROUS RNS come to an interview with their mothers!

I believe you. While I was doing hiring, I had to tell several applicant's mothers to wait in the lobby while I interviewed their "children" in my office, witnessed mothers and fathers come in with applicants to help them fill out applications, received threatening calls from outraged parents when I did not hire their man- or woman-child... and my favorite was when an applicant's mother told me to get one of the nurses to "babysit" the applicant's children (real children--an infant and two toddlers) because she would be in the interview with the childrens' mother and therefore unavailable for grandchild tending.

Yes, I canceled that interview and told the applicant to reschedule after she'd made appropriate child-care arrangements. My administrator told me that the applicant's mother called the corporate office complaining about how badly she had been treated and the "abuse" her daughter and "those innocent children" had received at my hands. Then, I never heard about it again.

Edited by TakeOne

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KimberlyRN89 works as a New Grad.

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I believe you. While I was doing hiring, I had to tell several applicant's mothers to wait in the lobby while I interviewed their "children" in my office, witnessed mothers and fathers come in with applicants to help them fill out applications, received threatening calls from outraged parents when I did not hire their man- or woman-child... and my favorite was when an applicant's mother told me to get one of the nurses to "babysit" the applicant's children (real children--an infant and two toddlers) because she would be in the interview with the childrens' mother and therefore unavailable for grandchild tending.

Yes, I canceled that interview and told the applicant to reschedule after she'd made appropriate child-care arrangements. My administrator told me that the applicant's mother called the corporate office complaining about how badly she had been treated and the "abuse" her daughter and "those innocent children" had received at my hands. Then, I never heard about it again.

Someone brought their mom to an interview? What is the world coming to?!? Will their mom be coming to work with them & help them assess patients, pass meds, & chart? :eek::eek::eek::eek::eek::eek:

Ive never heard of anything so bizarre!!!!

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I'm 22 years old and the ABSOLUTE only reason I would ever bring one of my parents with me on an interview would be if they were driving me, and only then because I tend to get nervous with driving places I haven't been several times and think it would be worse to show up late than with my mom. For the record though, I would probably ask them to wait in the car or discreetly in the waiting room or something.

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RNDreamer works as a Nurse.

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My question is: Why ARE the mothers going?

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DoGoodThenGo works as a Entrepreneur - Business Owner.

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My question is: Why ARE the mothers going?

Psst!They are called " Helicopter Parents". Google (or any good search engine), should bring up pages of results.In a nutshell these are parents who simply won't let go of their children, even after they are college age, young adults.Things have reach a point that this year as students, especially freshmen arrive on college campus, parents are being given everything from subtle hints to out right instructions when it is time for them to pack up and go, and let their child get on.On the other side of this coin are the huge numbers of children returning home to live post college. Many because they simply cannot find employment, others for various reasons, but it is too easy for some parents to allow that young adult to turn back into a "child" under this arrangement.

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It isn't just the parents -- I've taught in a state university BSN program within the last few years (after being out of nursing ed for a long time) and was shocked to find that many of the nursing students (the females, at least) talked to their mothers by telephone, not just on a daily basis but SEVERAL TIMES A DAY.

Silly me, I always thought half the point of going to college was to get away from your parents ...

Edited by elkpark

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Not_A_Hat_Person has 10 years experience as a RN.

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Our parents went through a war and a depression and certainly passed on a different work ethic than we aging hippies passed on to our children.

And their parents complained about their lack of a work ethic.

Every generation thinks kids are lazy and spoiled.

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subee has 45 years experience as a MSN, CRNA and works as a CRNA, retired.

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And their parents complained about their lack of a work ethic.

Every generation thinks kids are lazy and spoiled.

Well, yes. We all know the Socrates quote. But I don't remember historical readings of the very long childhoods our chldren are afforded. Adults calling their parents several times a day - never here and I doubt that it has happened anywhere. College administrators who have to call the parents off? I think this is a new phenomenon. And I haven't seen the words "lazy" or "spoiled" in previous posters. Lazy and spoiled aren't the point. These new attitudes are so different than those of the older baby boomers that I don't think we have labels for them yet. We're just here to observe. The young adults of today have never had exposure to dire poverty (we took it for granted), sacrificing for a war (has anyone's life style been altered because of Afghan. or Iraq?). It's not their FAULT that they grew up in different times. And they won't have to contend with our ancient outlooks for long because we'll all be retired. I'm just not sure that I feel comfortable about my future exposure to the medical-industrial complex. Stay healthy, everyone!

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