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Is overkill possible for nursing student curriculum?

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by Despareux Despareux (New Member) New Member

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I get the importance of some paperwork, but the majority of our scholarly papers do not enhance my learning. We do a cultural paper each quarter: overkill! I love other cultures and learning about them, but in my opinion, writing about providing health care to a specific culture does nothing for me. I think our time is better spent in a clinical setting with a reflection of our daily experiences, or something to that effect. I love care plans--those always enhance my learning. I just think there are better ways of teaching than giving out assignments that are not conducive to learning. As a matter of fact, we are told by other nurses and alumni that our school is probably better than most at producing highly knowledgeable students, but we lag significantly behind in the clinical setting.

I do understand that everyone learns differently, but the overwhelming consensus in our class is that the amount of work assigned is overkill and not conducive to learning.

Yeah, I'm venting. I'm writing a paper; can you tell? :banghead:

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190 Posts; 2,329 Profile Views

we dont have any papers to write. We had one that involved writing down all the health care services in a specific community but it took like 1 hour. all we do is lecture for 4 weeks, test every week then clinical for 4 weeks. Repeat.

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937 Posts; 14,895 Profile Views

we dont have any papers to write. We had one that involved writing down all the health care services in a specific community but it took like 1 hour. all we do is lecture for 4 weeks, test every week then clinical for 4 weeks. Repeat.

I'm sort of jealous. :D

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ParkerBC,MSN,RN specializes in Medical Surgical/Addiction/Mental Health.

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The practice of writing papers enhances one’s overall communication skills. If you are thinking about graduate school, you better know how to write scholarly. I think it is a good idea to have a required paper each quarter on a different culture. Knowing what to do for a client and his/her family of a different culture determines the okay nurses from great nurses. Our country continues to become more and more diverse. If future students are not prepared adequately, I think those students will be left behind. I don’t believe there is a single assignment that isn’t conducive to learning.

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Certifiable has 5 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Oncology/hematology.

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To tell you the truth, it sounds way more relexing than my schedule:

Sun- 9am-16:00 lectures (genetics, nutrition, embriology) 4 tests in june-july

mon- clinicals 7am-15:00. (care plans, history, etc' to hand in)

tue- " " " "

wed- " " " "

Thurs- random nursing lectures 8am-14:00. 4 tests during june-july...

I miss learning about those sorta things... reminds me of sociology lessons in my first year.

We write a few papers here and there, nothing of substance--- that is saved for 3rd and 4th year.

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937 Posts; 14,895 Profile Views

The practice of writing papers enhances one's overall communication skills... Knowing what to do for a client and his/her family of a different culture determines the okay nurses from great nurses. Our country continues to become more and more diverse. If future students are not prepared adequately, I think those students will be left behind. I don't believe there is a single assignment that isn't conducive to learning.

Yeah, you're mostly right; although, I disagree that every assignment is worthy for everybody. Not everyone learns the material the same way.

We have three classes and two clinical days, a paper due for each class, on top of our clinical assignments/homework, reading, and two tests each week and other assignments from our other class...it's overkill.

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ParkerBC,MSN,RN specializes in Medical Surgical/Addiction/Mental Health.

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You’re preaching to the choir. I just completed an accelerated program (63 credit hours in 14 months). During the summer, I had: Peds and OB in 5 weeks, Adult Health II and Pharmacology in 4 weeks, and Nutrition and Mental Health 4 weeks. We had one day off, Sunday. We were required to complete the same course work as the traditional student. In other words, the care plans, papers, exams, ect…

I do agree, not everyone learns the material the same way. Perhaps that is why there are so many different learning theories. However, learning still takes place. For example, you feel that the amount of work is overkill. I learned something about your comment that caused me to question the amount of work a nursing student is required to complete. You taught me that…yeah perhaps a change in the nursing curriculum is needed.

I agree. It is a lot of work. There were days when I was like, I give up. There is no reason to continue putting myself through this stress. But, then I realized why I was in school again.

You sound very intelligent...although I know the work is a lot, you will do exceptionally well on the assignments! Summers are difficult!

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937 Posts; 14,895 Profile Views

Those accelerated programs are tough; I'm in one, too. Thank you for understanding. I like the way you think--we're thinking along the same lines :D.

It's overkill!!! Yeah, I know I must get over it, and I will. I'll do my work and stop complaining now. I feel better...why? Because I finished my paper and now I can work on my care plan.

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Moogie specializes in Gerontology, nursing education.

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We have three classes and two clinical days, a paper due for each class, on top of our clinical assignments/homework, reading, and two tests each week and other assignments from our other class...it's overkill.

You're preaching to the choir. I just completed an accelerated program (63 credit hours in 14 months). During the summer, I had: Peds and OB in 5 weeks, Adult Health II and Pharmacology in 4 weeks, and Nutrition and Mental Health 4 weeks. We had one day off, Sunday. We were required to complete the same course work as the traditional student. In other words, the care plans, papers, exams, ect...

That's a LOT of work. No wonder you feel stressed, herasheis; an ABSN program is exhausting! I think your hard work will pay off in that you are learning what you need, but it's hard to know that you're learning when you can't even catch your breath.

I think both of you (herasheis and ParkerBeanCurd) are wise in realizing that there are different learning styles and, therefore, a variety of approaches and assignments is necessary to help optimize learning. You're also wise in recognizing that curricular change may be necessary to help students get through ABSN programs. Out of curiosity, what changes would you recommend in your programs that might ease the stress but still help you to learn? What do you think could be done differently?

Herasheis, I am curious about what you think would help you to learn about multicultural nursing. Do you think it would be better to have a specific course on transcultural nursing rather than integrate it through the curriculum as your program currently does it? The programs I've done (ADN, BSN, MSN) have integrated multicultural content throughout their curricula. However, none of my programs ever required a multicultural paper each term like your program does (though I did write a number of papers on multicultural concerns in nursing and nursing education.)

Again, just asking out of curiosity. Thanks in advance for your replay. I hope you get a chance to rest and recharge soon!

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937 Posts; 14,895 Profile Views

Out of curiosity, what changes would you recommend in your programs that might ease the stress but still help you to learn? What do you think could be done differently?

Writing papers is not all bad. I don't believe that writing 3 or 4 papers per quarter is going to enhance anyone's learning. Too much stress decreases cognitive ability.

For me, care plans have been the best learning tool thus far. I llove lecture, especially

Herasheis, I am curious about what you think would help you to learn about multicultural nursing. Do you think it would be better to have a specific course on transcultural nursing rather than integrate it through the curriculum as your program currently does it?

I like integrated learning. But instead of writing a paper, I would rather go visit a group or agency that is culturally specific and then report my findings. I think basic rules like eye contact and touch should be reiterated each quarter. I have been exposed to many, many cultures and I have never had someone from any culture decline sharing information about their culture, so I just ask them what I need or want to know.

Writing papers would not be so bad if some of the rubrics were clarified a little better. I don't like that some of the rubrics are open for interpretation--this tends to cause mass confusion, a disappointment in grades, and a strong dislike for writing. So there's my reason for my dislike of writing.

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Seas has 4 years experience and specializes in Telemetry, OB, NICU.

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I don't know what semester you are in, but hey welcome to nursing school. Yes it kills, and it is overwhelming and intense.

Culture papers wise, yes I think it is a helpful and needed assignment. I see a reason for every project we have in nursing school.

I don't think it is a "not everybody learns the same way" topic. You are talking about "unnecessary" paper assignments right? Or are you talking about doing a writing rather than watching a video about cultures? Now, that would be a learning ways topic.

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dudette10 has 14 years experience as a MSN, RN.

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Herasheis, I am curious about what you think would help you to learn about multicultural nursing. Do you think it would be better to have a specific course on transcultural nursing rather than integrate it through the curriculum as your program currently does it? The programs I've done (ADN, BSN, MSN) have integrated multicultural content throughout their curricula. However, none of my programs ever required a multicultural paper each term like your program does (though I did write a number of papers on multicultural concerns in nursing and nursing education.)

You didn't direct this at me, but I think a good idea would be to match students with patients from other cultures during clinicals.

I am not from the same ethnic background as my husband, and the importance of actually working with people from different cultures (rather than writing a paper) hit home when I had a patient from my husband's ethnic background. I used what little of my husband's language I knew to establish a rapport. The patient said some things to me that I would have found a little offensive if I hadn't known where he was "coming from," so to speak. I also understood the family dynamic because I had seen it multiple times during family dinners and during crisis situations.

I had an understanding of my husband's culture only through constant exposure, but a light bulb went off in my head the day I took care of that particular patient. We had multicultural nursing interwoven into every single theory class, but I still needed the act of patient care to fully understand its importance.

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