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Is it OK to not work for a few years after passing NCLEX?

First Year   (2,348 Views 13 Comments)
by barkandwag barkandwag (New) New

978 Profile Views; 6 Posts

Heres a question. Once I have Graduated and passed my NCLEX. I would like to take a few years off to work on a relationship http://images.allnurses.com/smilies/added/redbeatheart.gif and personal things. Would that be acceptable to not start working as a nurse until 2 or 3 years after taking my NCLEX?http://images.allnurses.com/smilies/xmas/starornament.png

Thanks for all Advice.

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Jules A is a MSN and specializes in Family Nurse Practitioner.

2 Followers; 8,863 Posts; 47,084 Profile Views

I wouldn't do it. Your skills will be non existent and you will fall into the cracks of being a new grad but not a new grad. Could you work part-time? I just can't imagine needing that amount of time off work to focus on anything, let alone a relationship, but I have to admit I'm a total workaholic. :D

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Jami RN has 13 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Cardiac, Step-Down, Psych, Recruiting.

94 Posts; 2,947 Profile Views

As a charge nurse who participates in interviewing and hiring, and also as a former nurse recruiter, I would strongly advise you not to do this. You will be in permanent limbo and no one will hire you, especially in this current economic climate. You will lose all of your skills and practical knowledge in a year or two and will be seen as worse than a new grad. I know that my unit won't even hire a new grad part-time and we require all new grads to be full time for the first year so they can build their skills and solidify their knowledge.

I would strongly advise you to work full time for a year after taking your NCLEX and then drop your hours to part time to work on your issues. Once you have 3 to 5 years of experience, you will be able to take a break from nursing and re-enter without difficulty.

Good luck.

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NC Girl BSN specializes in Psych, LTC, Acute Care.

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You will regret it and probably will never get a job in a hospital. Not sure they will hire you in LTC either after 2 years with no experience.

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2 Followers; 14,620 Posts; 103,915 Profile Views

As a charge nurse who participates in interviewing and hiring, and also as a former nurse recruiter, I would strongly advise you not to do this. You will be in permanent limbo and no one will hire you, especially in this current economic climate. You will lose all of your skills and practical knowledge in a year or two and will be seen as worse than a new grad. I know that my unit won't even hire a new grad part-time and we require all new grads to be full time for the first year so they can build their skills and solidify their knowledge.

I would strongly advise you to work full time for a year after taking your NCLEX and then drop your hours to part time to work on your issues. Once you have 3 to 5 years of experience, you will be able to take a break from nursing and re-enter without difficulty.

Good luck.

:yeahthat:

Nursing is v. conscious of the "use it or lose it" principle -- you will be extremely unattractive and uncompetitive as a job candidate if you do what you're suggesting.

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3 Followers; 36,942 Posts; 98,036 Profile Views

I also advise you not to do this. You will not be helping your chances to get a job to begin with, and you are setting yourself up to get rusty and forget your skills. Employers will choose a fresh new grad who is eager to work over you every time.

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27 Posts; 1,326 Profile Views

I would only do this if the guy happens to be a millionaire and you're looking to marry him. ;)

seriously though, I would at least try to find a very part time job in a TCU or something. Maybe like every other weekend? At least that way you can keep your skills up! :)

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MERRYWIDOW46 has 33 years experience and specializes in ER, OR, PACU, TELE, CATH LAB, OPEN HEART.

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First off, MY state and many others require a specific number of hours in practice to renew you license. Also, as others have posted, you will loose your skills and knowledge base from lack of use.

New grads take at least a year to transition to the RN role from school. It is best done on a consistent full time basis on the same hospital unit.

I agree with the former recruiter, as a former manager and director in the hospital setting I would advise against taking time off. Work fulltime for a minimum of one year. Then you could drop your hours to part time. I would NOT even consider taking an extended period of time off untill you had 3-5 years experience in a hospital.

These are tough times for new and experieinced nurses. YOU need to show employers you are better than the other 30 candidates for the position.

Good luck.

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GooeyRN has 12 years experience as a ASN, RN and specializes in Psych, Med/Surg, LTC.

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I would work some at first, at least a year. Maybe not full-time, but at least 24 hours a week. Then go very limited per-diem after that year. After you get a little experience you can maintain per-diem status with very little hours, and still be considered employed. :cool:

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2,801 Posts; 13,414 Profile Views

I agree with the above. I do want to comment, though, that the "first year of work is the real last year of school" message often isn't given to nursing students until just prior to graduation and often isn't given at all to pre-nursing students. Instead, what most aspiring nurses hear is "You can always count on a job in nursing" and "once you have your license, you're good as gold." So it can come as a bit of shock to find out as graduation approaches that straight out of school and/or without recent experience you may not be as marketable as you expected to be or have the kind of choices that were described as available to anyone with a license.

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1,714 Posts; 8,596 Profile Views

I know an RN who took a year off after graduation and NCLEX and continued bartending, because he didn't feel he was quite ready for a "real" job yet. It took him a while when he was ready to start to find a job, but he was able to find one eventually. This was about 10 years ago however, and most hospitals in our area were providing loan repayment and sign on bonuses. When he interviewed places, every single one told him that his taking a year off was a serious issue. He didn't get the job he wanted, but he got one and stayed on that floor for several years. So - while not recommended, it can be done.

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I think getting a part time job is your best bet, you need to get the experience and have a foundation of applying what you learned in school and seeing what nursing is really like. It is so hard to get a new grad job right now, it may get worse or better, but you would be giving youself one more hurdle to have to overcome. You can work on your relationship and still have a job! I guess I do not understand why you cannot work and work on a relationship? Red flags are going up here! I was raised to always be able to stand on my own two feet and support myself FIRST,then relationships come second. WHy do you think you cannot work?

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