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Is it ok to send resume directly to unit director, and not just online to HR?

Nurses   (9,870 Views 20 Comments)
by Irock Irock (New Member) New Member

2,110 Visitors; 47 Posts

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I am applying for a job that I really want, and was thinking about mailing a hard copy of my resume/cover letter to the director of the unit, in addition to the application I just did online (which HR will probably see, but probably not the director of the unit, I'm assuming). What do you think? Is this ok, or would this be annoying to them? I don't mind taking the little bit of extra time to do it, but I don't want to annoy anybody...

What do you think? Is this good, bad, or doesn't matter?

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2,232 Visitors; 88 Posts

What's the worst they can say... "This is not how we do things." I would do it especially since that person is the one making the hiring decision. By communicating your desire to work for that unit directly with that unit director, you get your name out there plus you may even be able to score an interview quicker. I don't think you have anything to lose by doing it.

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2,110 Visitors; 47 Posts

Cool, that's what I figured. Thanks!

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8,603 Visitors; 1,008 Posts

You could personally email the unit director introducing yourself and expressing your strong interest in the position and attach your cover letter and resume. It's quicker and you'll know it got to him/her. If they are interested, they can open the attached files, and if not, they can just delete. No big deal. I've done this for every job I've gotten because going through HR was a nightmare.

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OttawaRPN has 5 years experience and specializes in acute care med/surg, LTC, orthopedics.

3,858 Visitors; 451 Posts

Do NOT send your resume directly to the unit director, unless someone who works there has put in a good word for you.

There is a reason HR exists, to weed out the bazillion applications and short list it for the NM. If you boldly bypass the system because you think you can, it will make you look intrusive and pretentious, same as walking onto a unit and expecting the NM to drop everything to make time to see you.

Yes, it IS all about who you know. Instead of wasting yours and their time with this nonsense... network, network, network. If you know someone who works at your dream hospital, see if they can help tow you along, otherwise get back to the end of the line.

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Fiona59 has 18 years experience.

1 Follower; 52,687 Visitors; 8,275 Posts

It's also all about seniority and experience. My managers have been less than pleased to have been approached directly by outside applicants. And that is what you are, an "outsider".

HR always looks at who is within the system and looking for a move before they turn to the outside hiring pool.

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2,232 Visitors; 88 Posts

Do NOT send your resume directly to the unit director, unless someone who works there has put in a good word for you.

There is a reason HR exists, to weed out the bazillion applications and short list it for the NM. If you boldly bypass the system because you think you can, it will make you look intrusive and pretentious, same as walking onto a unit and expecting the NM to drop everything to make time to see you.

Yes, it IS all about who you know. Instead of wasting yours and their time with this nonsense... network, network, network. If you know someone who works at your dream hospital, see if they can help tow you along, otherwise get back to the end of the line.

I agree with the networking, but I've also heard about people getting jobs/interviews by sending managers resumes directly or contacting them directly. Sometimes, the gatekeepers don't let you pass so you have to be more aggressive with your job hunt. Some managers like the people who take initiative and some managers do not like it if you don't apply "by the book". Either way, it's a gamble: you can apply the traditional way and get an interview OR NOT, or you can apply the traditional way and contact the manager directly and get an interview OR NOT. I think the OP actually has a better shot at the job if he/she takes the initiative to contact the director. Considering today's job markets the hundreds if not thousands of applicants HR has at their disposal, why not try?

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6,071 Visitors; 297 Posts

I think doing that will make you look presumptuous and possibly get your resume thrown in the trash without a second glance. Doing so would probably not convey sound judgment to the UM. There is a reason HR exists- if everyone simply sent their resumes straight to the UM, HR wouldn't be needed at all for the hiring process. I think it would be seen as an annoyance and I believe you're better off sending resume and possibly following up with a phone call.

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754 Visitors; 24 Posts

A bunch of my friends got jobs by calling the director of the unit. One was told that if she did not call that she would have had no idea who she was. Another said to have HR send their resume to the unit.

With the job market the way it is you NEED to be aggressive. It's a fine line though. Don't be too pushy, but you have to show that you're interested. Follow up with HR as well to make sure they recieved everything they need. Also, make sure to send thank you notes after you speak with them as well. Good luck!

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2 Articles; 50,335 Visitors; 5,682 Posts

Count me in the "work within the system" group. While I've heard anecdotes of it working for some folks, I can assure you that the managers that I know would not give it a second thought - and it might actually get you blacklisted.

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Aramid,PhlRN specializes in Communicable Diseases.

918 Visitors; 3 Posts

In my opinion, It will be best to send your resumé to approrpriate channels of the company. It would sound unfair for those who followed the proper guidelines.

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OttawaRPN has 5 years experience and specializes in acute care med/surg, LTC, orthopedics.

3,858 Visitors; 451 Posts

I agree with the networking, but I've also heard about people getting jobs/interviews by sending managers resumes directly or contacting them directly. Sometimes, the gatekeepers don't let you pass so you have to be more aggressive with your job hunt. Some managers like the people who take initiative and some managers do not like it if you don't apply "by the book". Either way, it's a gamble: you can apply the traditional way and get an interview OR NOT, or you can apply the traditional way and contact the manager directly and get an interview OR NOT. I think the OP actually has a better shot at the job if he/she takes the initiative to contact the director. Considering today's job markets the hundreds if not thousands of applicants HR has at their disposal, why not try?

Why not try? Well because there's a very good chance the NM is going to consider you a nuisance and simply smile and nod to move you along, then promptly toss your resume in the trash. That is if she doesn't sharply tell you to drop it off at HR. Jeez, even when I want to speak to my NM about anything, I just about have to make an appointment! These are pretty busy people, juggling b/t meetings, rounds, unit issues, staff concerns, physician issues and still trying to maintain a presence on the units, so hardly in a position to accommodate an eager beaver who appears unannounced sabotaging their time demanding immediate attention and consideration. If I were a NM, I wouldn't give you the time of day.

Which segues me into one of my biggest pet peeves... people who treat hospitals like museums or shopping malls strolling idly through the common areas as if looking for something to do. Not there as a patient, probably not there to see a patient, not there for any other reason than to pester those of us trying to get some work done. Just because the doors don't lock doesn't mean you are welcome in anytime.

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