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Is your nursing practice guided by nursing theory and research based evidence?

Nurses   (15,909 Views 21 Comments)
by kurume830 kurume830 (New Member) New Member

1,072 Visitors; 3 Posts

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Hello,

I am a graduate nursing student studying Advanced Public Health Nursing. I am doing a survey for my graduate nursing class regarding evidence-based practice. I'd like to ask the allnurses community whether you do (or don't) use research to guide your nursing practices. If so, how is your nursing practice guided by theoretical approach or researched-based evidence? Please include your title and field of nursing in your response (if you wish to share). Thanks!

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14,870 Visitors; 937 Posts

I start NS in a few weeks as a newbie, and I have often wondered the same thing. Can't wait to read everyone's responses.

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GHGoonette specializes in PACU, OR.

24,410 Visitors; 1,249 Posts

Most of nursing is common sense backed by a body of knowledge. Once you cut out all the scientific jargon, that's what most of it boils down to. A lot of the terms you come up against, like "nursing diagnosis" and "individual care plans" consist of stuff we've been doing all the time, it's just that someone's come up with a highly intelligent-sounding name for it.

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RNperdiem has 14 years experience.

1 Follower; 29,200 Visitors; 4,151 Posts

The hospital adjusts its policies and procedures when research finds best practice.

For example, a few years ago my hospital overhauled its skin care policies and everyone attended the mandatory inservice about the various products and their uses. Adult care briefs are no longer used on incontinent patients unless they are being transported to a procedure.

This change came from research results.

So in short, I don't individually read all the new research, but the hospital committee determining policy does.

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7,155 Visitors; 460 Posts

To answer your question frankly, in 16 years of consecutive bedside ICU nursing I can honestly say that my Nursing practice is "needs based" and "reactionary" in nature. Despite all of the changes in terminology and re-definitions over the years, the one constant has been that patient lying in the bed.

Those needs, and the interventions required to meet those needs, never change despite the best efforts of many to re-define them. But what can I possibly know since I don't make policy.

I must go now lest Beavis start to wonder where I've gone to.

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roser13 has 17 years experience as a ASN, RN and specializes in Med/Surg, Ortho, ASC.

50,652 Visitors; 6,504 Posts

I actually had to stop and think about this question. I guess that means I don't routinely research nursing practices or use research in my daily practice.:lol2:

I'm going to echo what other posters have said or implied. My nursing practice is dictated by the patient lying in front of me combined with my years of nursing experience, and by my institution's P&P. To the extent that I am forced by my institution to change my practices because a new study has shown X,Y or Z, I admit that you will likely find me rolling my eyes in private. Experience (research of my own, if you will) has shown me that another study will come along in a year or so showing that A,B or C is now the study to follow.

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Scarlette Wings has 27 years experience and specializes in M/S, ICU, ICP.

6,720 Visitors; 358 Posts

Hi.

You may want to ask the site moderators to help you form your question into a "poll" format and place it in the nursing poll area. That helped me a great deal in getting enough response to truly do my own paper on the issue I was having to study in the past.

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werkinit specializes in Pediatric Oncology/BMT.

2,815 Visitors; 75 Posts

The hospital adjusts its policies and procedures when research finds best practice.

For example, a few years ago my hospital overhauled its skin care policies and everyone attended the mandatory inservice about the various products and their uses. Adult care briefs are no longer used on incontinent patients unless they are being transported to a procedure.

This change came from research results.

So in short, I don't individually read all the new research, but the hospital committee determining policy does.

I'm at a hospital that uses briefs w/ incontinent patients...do you know anything more about the research behind it?? Maybe we should look into our skin care policies too!

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nurse2033 is a MSN, RN and specializes in ER, ICU.

3 Articles; 28,207 Visitors; 2,122 Posts

I work now in ICU and our unit uses the AACN practice guidelines which are highly evidence based. We get small changes pretty frequently. Theory seems to be the "old" paradigm since many practices based on theory were later proved ineffective (intracardiac epi for example).

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Flo. has 7 years experience and specializes in Developmental Disabilites,.

8,077 Visitors; 571 Posts

nope. My Practice is dictated by hospital policy and procedures. Research does effect those.

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17 Articles; 31,153 Visitors; 4,167 Posts

The shared governance committees at our hospital and within our system look at research and evidence-based outcomes. Based on their findings, we have altered a number of P&P items and will continue to do so as the situation warrants.

I do not personally research nursing practices as this requires carefully controlled conditions and protocols. However, if in my own practice I run across something that gives me an idea or makes me question something, I can certainly look to see what's been done in this area. Then I can submit that information to the correct shared governance committee and they can take it from there.

This reduces the chance of finding EBP information that would put me in conflict with the hospital's P&P. If any one nurse thinks there's a discrepancy, she can shine a spotlight on the area in question and give the whole hospital a chance to benefit from the latest research.

Another point is that with so many studies conflicting with so many other studies, it isn't always a good idea to jump quickly on the band wagon. Sometimes you have to let the dust settle to see what really can be backed up scientifically and what is a passing fad.

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resumecpr has 7 years experience and specializes in ED, ICU, Education.

8,017 Visitors; 297 Posts

Rosemarie Parse's theory of human becoming. It's almost subconscious now. When I was in nursing school, I remember thinking to myself, "When am I going to find the right time, place, patient to use this darn theory?" The answer: ALL THE TIME!!! I find it also kind of keeps me grounded and focused in the ICU when dealing with a dying patient and their family.

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