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Is LTC a good option if I can't find a job?

First Year   (2,690 Views | 13 Replies)

2,777 Profile Views; 54 Posts

Hi everyone!

I graduated with my BSN on March 11, 2016 and have been job hunting since April 11, 2016 when I was officially licensed. I've been to 4 in-person interviews and 2 phone interviews for acute-care positions, but I have yet to be selected for a position. My student loan payments start in September (and it's a hefty monthly payment), so I'm starting to freak out a bit.

While I continue applying/interviewing for hospital jobs in Portland, OR, I was offered a part-time Charge RN/Medication Aide job (with potential to move to F/T soon) at a LTC facility. I plan on taking it to gain experience and start saving money.

Would you advise this as a good option?

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316 Posts; 7,774 Profile Views

Anything is better than nothing while you are waiting. It took me 2 years to find my first nursing job which ended up being on a psych unit. Thank God I had a full time job already in another field.

Hospital life sucks, now I'm ready for something with normal hours with no shifts and holidays.

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Larry3373 has 2 years experience and specializes in Critical Care; Recovery.

281 Posts; 3,179 Profile Views

I agree that anything is better than nothing. I know a few people that started out that way and were able to find acute care positions later. It looks better than no experience at all, that's for sure. You may be able to get your student loans extended if you call them.

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vampiregirl has 10 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Hospice.

1 Article; 683 Posts; 13,575 Profile Views

There's lots to be learned at SNF - prioritization, delegation, documentation, assessment, care coordination, management of chronic conditions and many skills. For my SNF experience skills included: g-tube, IV initiation, IV meds, IV fluids, lab draws, TPN administration, catheters, care of various ostomies (urostomy, ileostomy, colostomy, nephrostomy), wound care (including 2 brands of wound vacs) and care of various drains. This experience has been very helpful even after I left SNF nursing.

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downsouthlaff has 9 years experience as a LPN and specializes in Nursing Home.

1 Article; 284 Posts; 12,095 Profile Views

I've been an LPN at an LTC/Nursing Home since being a new grad nurse 2 years ago. I can say that as a nurse in LTC I have learned lots and lots. Lots of meds. Being good and assessments and charting. Most recently IV therapy.

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amoLucia specializes in LTC.

5,453 Posts; 46,585 Profile Views

Please don't knock LTC!!!

LTC positions are also JOBS!!!

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432 Posts; 32,320 Profile Views

Any job you can get is good experience. After my hospital job ended after a 3-month, unsuccessful orientation on a cardiovascular surgical PCU, I was told that I had to get a year experience elsewhere. Although I had also applied to clinic jobs, the only jobs that I got interviews for and offers from were long term care facilities. My attitude about this was initially very negative, but nearly three months into the job, and I've already improved my nursing skills and learned ones that I probably never would have by staying at the hospital. The workload can be high, and you can expect to be the only nurse at least occasionally for a large number of residents, but the acuity is generally pretty low. It's a good way to master time management and gain new skills one at a time, instead of having to learn a large set in a short amount of time. Orientation at these jobs is shorter, so you learn as you go. This type of orientation was almost more suitable for me, because I can just do things as I see fit and don't have to answer to anyone or let anyone know my every move. Believe me, I can understand any reluctance or negativity you may have, because I had that...and still do sometimes...but it may be a good move until you can get the acute care job you want.

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305 Posts; 71,755 Profile Views

Just out of curiosity:

How does one go about finding a job at a LTC facility?

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barcode120x has 5 years experience as a ADN, BSN, RN and specializes in Telemetry.

544 Posts; 10,418 Profile Views

Just out of curiosity:

How does one go about finding a job at a LTC facility?

Check local LTC websites for any open positions. They may show up and healthcare related career fairs too. I had a very good nursing office at my nursing school where they would go out of their way to find open positions for nurses; although, a majority of them were from LTCs and SNF, but as many others had said, a job is a job.

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54 Posts; 2,777 Profile Views

There's lots to be learned at SNF - prioritization, delegation, documentation, assessment, care coordination, management of chronic conditions and many skills.

Absolutely! Just completed my first week and I'm looking forward to the learning experiences to come. I can already see that this position will allow me to gain a lot of valuable knowledge and experiences.

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54 Posts; 2,777 Profile Views

Any job you can get is good experience. After my hospital job ended after a 3-month, unsuccessful orientation on a cardiovascular surgical PCU, I was told that I had to get a year experience elsewhere. Although I had also applied to clinic jobs, the only jobs that I got interviews for and offers from were long term care facilities. My attitude about this was initially very negative, but nearly three months into the job, and I've already improved my nursing skills and learned ones that I probably never would have by staying at the hospital. The workload can be high, and you can expect to be the only nurse at least occasionally for a large number of residents, but the acuity is generally pretty low. It's a good way to master time management and gain new skills one at a time, instead of having to learn a large set in a short amount of time. Orientation at these jobs is shorter, so you learn as you go. This type of orientation was almost more suitable for me, because I can just do things as I see fit and don't have to answer to anyone or let anyone know my every move. Believe me, I can understand any reluctance or negativity you may have, because I had that...and still do sometimes...but it may be a good move until you can get the acute care job you want.

Everything you said is exactly what I'm feeling. The first day I was overwhelmed with information; the second day I cried at lunch time because I never wanted to work in a SNF; the third day I felt a lot better and more confident. Each day gets better as I learn the ropes and get to know my staff. I will only have 6 days of training which I'm nervous about...

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54 Posts; 2,777 Profile Views

Indeed.com is a good one-stop-shop for job postings

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