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Is there any downside to doing ADN then RN to BSN?

Pre-Nursing   (1,432 Views 7 Comments)
by ICUchick ICUchick (Member) Member

ICUchick specializes in Critical care.

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I recently applied to a BSN program (starts Jan 2012) in my area but I am trying to think of what other options may be available if I dont get in which I know is a strong possibility considering the number of people applying.

I am considering also applying to an ADN program (starts August 2011) and then immediately going for an RN to BSN program.

Is there any downside to option 2? I am thinking of grant opportunities, costs, job opportunities, etc.

Thanks for any advice you can offer!

Angela

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91 Posts; 2,107 Profile Views

I personally am going ADN the RN-BSN. My reasoning for that is there are fewer gen ed classes required for ADN (such as no history, foreign lang, 200 level + English ...) and they are not required for the bridge. So in the long run, I will have to pay for fewer classes, be able to find a job before going back and possibly finding an employer that will pay for the bridge.

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64 Posts; 2,564 Profile Views

In areas where new grad jobs are in short supply, having an AD instead of a BSN may put you at a disadvantage at landing your first job. Many hospitals in my area will only hire BSN nurses.

If the job markets for new grads in your area is strong, then I wouldn't worry about that.

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ICUchick specializes in Critical care.

47 Posts; 2,420 Profile Views

Thank you both for your replies!

I most likely will not be looking for a job until I have my BSN anyway. The college I am looking out structures the course very oddly, in my opinion. It goes like this:

1. Algebra, Writing, 2 sciences are required for acceptance

2. 2 year program at end you recieve ADN and take NCLEX

3. Once you pass the NCLEX you enter the last year of the program which is an RN to BSN program.

They do not offer just a BSN program. Weird, I thought! Though perhaps they can have higher attendance rates this way since you are earning your BSN in 3 years and they can also target current ADN's looking to continue their education.

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21 Posts; 2,087 Profile Views

I myself applied to both, but was so thrilled to have gotten into the BSN program. Although it's more expensive, I feel like if I would have gotten into the ADN and realized how difficult it was I probably would have had a hard time continuing onto the BSN program. I'm not sure where you're from, but most hospital around here (Central California) are hiring A LOT more BSN students vs. ADN and I've heard in the next 10 years that they will require RN's to get their BSN. So, if you're motivated and stick with it, go with whichever program you get into! I wouldn't of passed up ADN if it came before the BSN program!

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akulahawkRN has 3 years experience as a ADN, RN, EMT-P and specializes in Emergency Department.

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About the only thing I can see as a downside is time. It'll take longer to go ADN to BSN. On the other hand, this does give you a chance to start earning an income as you go to school for the upgrade. I'd be surprised if the RN-BSN programs weren't designed around the working nurse. In my case, it wouldn't take all that long as I already have a Bachelor's, so all the upper division stuff is essentially done. Being that Sac State requires 30 units to award a 2nd Bachelors and the upgrade path is but 26 units... I'd have to find a 4 unit upper division course to make things work out nicely. I figure I'd be able to knock that out in about 2 semesters and a summer semester. Unfortunately, that would also mean that I'd be in school for 3 years total to get the BSN. That's where the disadvantage is for doing ADN->BSN instead of a straight BSN program.

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Moogie specializes in Gerontology, nursing education.

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Thank you both for your replies!

I most likely will not be looking for a job until I have my BSN anyway. The college I am looking out structures the course very oddly, in my opinion. It goes like this:

1. Algebra, Writing, 2 sciences are required for acceptance

2. 2 year program at end you recieve ADN and take NCLEX

3. Once you pass the NCLEX you enter the last year of the program which is an RN to BSN program.

They do not offer just a BSN program. Weird, I thought! Though perhaps they can have higher attendance rates this way since you are earning your BSN in 3 years and they can also target current ADN's looking to continue their education.

Just make sure that the program is accredited by either the NLNAC or CCNE. If it isn't accredited (or is not eligible for accreditation), you could have problems finding employment and going on for additional education if you choose to do so.

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