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Is this crazy?

NP Students   (942 Views 22 Comments)
by ThePrincessBride ThePrincessBride (Member)

ThePrincessBride has 3 years experience .

35 Likes; 55,296 Visitors; 2,212 Posts

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So I got to into a Family Nurse Practitioner program. It is part-time, online and associated with a B and M school with a very large hospital. It is extremely expensive. In order to get my tuition paid for, I would need to work at the hospital full-time. No problem. Already have an offer on the adult med-surg floor that I work contingent on. However...

I would have to leave my full-time NICU job at a different hospital and the thought is killing. I love babies. It was my dream job, and I thought I wanted to be a Neonatal Nurse Practitioner. But the thought of rotating shifts (two-six weeks days, two-six weeks nights, weekends and holidays) and being stuck in the hospital forever with very few employment opportunities was something I don't think I wanted to deal with. But I love the bedside care.

I could ask to go contingent, but that would require working 36 hours every six weeks, certain number of weekends and holidays. 

I don't have any kids, which makes things less complicated, but...

Am I nuts? Is it possible to juggle grad-school part-time, a full-time job (3 12s) and a contingent job?

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klone has 13 years experience as a MSN, RN and works as a Director of OB Services.

305 Likes; 3 Followers; 112,060 Visitors; 12,926 Posts

I did that very thing (full-time job, PRN float job, and midwifery school), with three young children (ages 2-12) but only lasted about 3 months, and then I quit the PRN float job. If you're very organized, a full-time job and grad school is very doable. Adding a second job to that is very challenging.

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Emergent has 25 years experience and works as a Emergency Room RN.

1,232 Likes; 6 Followers; 62,524 Visitors; 2,577 Posts

Congratulations on acceptance! If it were me, I wouldn't do it. It sounds too exhausting. 

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ThePrincessBride has 3 years experience.

35 Likes; 55,296 Visitors; 2,212 Posts

Klone, I am surprised you even attempted that. Were you in grad school full-time or part-time? And was it online?

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Jedrnurse has 25 years experience as a BSN, RN and works as a school nurse.

482 Likes; 10,880 Visitors; 1,050 Posts

...I would also consider the cost. (because if something goes wrong with the full-time work, you'll be stuck holding the tuition bag.)

Are they covering it completely?

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ThePrincessBride has 3 years experience.

35 Likes; 55,296 Visitors; 2,212 Posts

Most of it. 

The full-time med/surg job is the same job I have worked at for almost four years. I think everything will be okay with it as I have been there for a while. 

They are cover the vast majority of it, but not books and school fees. But I know I could get out of school without any student loans.

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traumaRUs has 25 years experience as a MSN, APRN and works as a Asst Community Manager @ allnurses.

478 Likes; 14 Followers; 127 Articles; 184,861 Visitors; 20,492 Posts

Moved to student NP forum. Congrats

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klone has 13 years experience as a MSN, RN and works as a Director of OB Services.

305 Likes; 3 Followers; 112,060 Visitors; 12,926 Posts

4 hours ago, ThePrincessBride said:

Klone, I am surprised you even attempted that. Were you in grad school full-time or part-time? And was it online?

They called it fulltime, but it didn't feel like a fulltime workload to me. Yes, it was online, but I did have to travel to Kentucky a couple times (Frontier Midwifery).

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ThePrincessBride has 3 years experience.

35 Likes; 55,296 Visitors; 2,212 Posts

19 hours ago, klone said:

They called it fulltime, but it didn't feel like a fulltime workload to me. Yes, it was online, but I did have to travel to Kentucky a couple times (Frontier Midwifery).

Meaning you thought the workload was light? My first semester is going to be two classes totaling 8 credit hours. Is that considered a lot? It has been a while since I have been in undergrad, and I know it is different in grad school. 

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ThePrincessBride has 3 years experience.

35 Likes; 55,296 Visitors; 2,212 Posts

Sorry for all of the threads, but I am stressing out a lot and I could use some insight from wiser people.

I am in the middle of getting ready to go to graduate school for FNP. I got into a university that finds preceptors for their students. I will be going to the program part-time online while working for the hospital full-time in order to have tuition paid for. I have worked this exact same job before dropping down to contingent, so I know what to expect. Love the coworkers. No set weekends (which I like). It is adult med-surg, and the patients, as a whole, treat the nurses horribly. However, the job has AMAZING benefits, I'm talking pensions, GREAT insurance, lots of sick/vacation time, lots of recognized holidays....

I would have to leave my position in the neonatal ICU and this gives me anxiety. I love the NICU, but I don't think I would be able to handle full-time work, contingent work AND grad school all at once. I find myself feeling sad. Also...

I am scared. So many people are going to school to become FNPs. Everyone and their dog is going to FNP school, and the market is quickly becoming flooded. I have talked to previous coworkers who have graduated. While nearly all of them have jobs, some are still working bedside and haven't secured a full-time position. Others are at retail clinics working every other weekend, holidays, and have on-call (which sounds horrible to me, even though I initially liked the idea of working at a minute clinic).

Ideally, I would love to work at an urgent care, a prison or a clinic where I could work 3-4 days per week with minimal weekend/holiday requirements, no call. Or I would like to work at the VA or a school system. Unfortunately, I am not seeing too many jobs out there that match that description or would hire a new grad.

So, I guess I am asking, is going to FNP school a mistake? Part of me thinks that I won't find a job. But if I don't go, I think I will look back in life and regret not at least trying, if that makes sense. Also, I won't have accrued any debt. And I KNOW I could switch to Psyche NP (there are LOTS of jobs, and I think I would LOVE psyche). I could go back and get a post-masters in Psyche. There is a year of overlap in the program, as well.

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traumaRUs has 25 years experience as a MSN, APRN and works as a Asst Community Manager @ allnurses.

478 Likes; 14 Followers; 127 Articles; 184,861 Visitors; 20,492 Posts

Merged topics in student NP forum.

To me, it sounds like maybe you need to take a step back before you commit to grad school. I realize that you are stressed out but really its doable working fulltime and going to school part time. However, you need to at least feel like you are making the right decision prior to investing in the time/money and effort it will take. New grad FNP positions in my area are certainly available but many include weekends, call, holidays, etc.. We have multiple urgent care clinics that are free-standing but they are open 8-8 daily and the NPs rotate the weekends. 

I've been an APRN for almost 13 years and my duties include call from 0600-1700 M-F but if needed I do some work occasionally at home. 

Best wishes on your decisions. 

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ThePrincessBride has 3 years experience.

35 Likes; 55,296 Visitors; 2,212 Posts

Sorry for all of the threads, but I am stressing out a lot and I could use some insight from wiser people.

I am in the middle of getting ready to go to graduate school for FNP. I got into a university that finds preceptors for their students. I will be going to the program part-time online while working for the hospital full-time in order to have tuition paid for. I have worked this exact same job before dropping down to contingent, so I know what to expect. Love the coworkers. No set weekends (which I like). It is adult med-surg, and the patients, as a whole, treat the nurses horribly. However, the job has AMAZING benefits, I'm talking pensions, GREAT insurance, lots of sick/vacation time, lots of recognized holidays....

I would have to leave my position in the neonatal ICU and this gives me anxiety. I love the NICU, but I don't think I would be able to handle full-time work, contingent work AND grad school all at once. I find myself feeling sad. Also...

I am scared. So many people are going to school to become FNPs. Everyone and their dog is going to FNP school, and the market is quickly becoming flooded. I have talked to previous coworkers who have graduated. While nearly all of them have jobs, some are still working bedside and haven't secured a full-time position. Others are at retail clinics working every other weekend, holidays, and have on-call (which sounds horrible to me, even though I initially liked the idea of working at a minute clinic).

Ideally, I would love to work at an urgent care, a prison or a clinic where I could work 3-4 days per week with minimal weekend/holiday requirements, no call. Or I would like to work at the VA or a school system. Unfortunately, I am not seeing too many jobs out there that match that description or would hire a new grad.

So, I guess I am asking, is going to FNP school a mistake? Part of me thinks that I won't find a job. But if I don't go, I think I will look back in life and regret not at least trying, if that makes sense. Also, I won't have accrued any debt. And I KNOW I could switch to Psyche NP (there are LOTS of jobs, and I think I would LOVE psyche). I could go back and get a post-masters in Psyche. There is a year of overlap in the program, as well.

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