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Is it appropriate to ask for time off during an interview?

Interview   (2,966 Views | 14 Replies)

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I am a new grad and have an interview tomorrow (my first one since graduating). My parents have surprised me with a 2 1/5 week vacation in Europe as a graduation gift. The vacation is set for this June. Luckily they have not purchased anything yet. Ideally I would like to postpone the vacation, but I cant because it is also a gift for my sister who is only free in June due to school and work etc. I am wondering if informing the interviewer that I would like time off in the near future will lessen my chance of getting the job.

Thank you for your advice in advance.

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Wolf at the Door has 7 years experience.

1,040 Posts; 19,684 Profile Views

Jeez I got a watch and a printer.

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16 Posts; 523 Profile Views

Yeah, my parents have actually been saving for this since I found out I got into nursing school.

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SierraMoon has 8 years experience as a ADN, BSN, RN and specializes in ICU/UM.

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No, ask after an offer has been made. The best thing would be to make your start date after the vacation. Missing that much time during a residency could be a no-go.

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BSNbeDONE specializes in Med/Surg, LTACH, LTC, Home Health.

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Absolutely let them know about pre-existing plans that were in the making before you were contacted about the position. Life goes on; nobody sits by the phone with it on hold pending a call that might not even happen. They will understand and will appreciate you giving them a heads-up.

That being said, exactly how long is the trip? The length might be somewhat of a deal-breaker especially when current staff have been waiting an entire year for a vacation. They might suggest (if they are contemplating bringing you onboard) that your start date begin after you return...however, I don't foresee them holding a position for a new grad for several months. But, who knows?

If nothing has been paid for, consider having the gift-givers change it for something else...I know that sounds tacky but it's hard for new grad nurses to land jobs these days. You don't want to blow your opportunity. Have a full discussion about this with the person giving the interview so you'll know what you need to do.

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Sour Lemon has 9 years experience.

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No, ask after an offer has been made. The best thing would be to make your start date after the vacation. Missing that much time during a residency could be a no-go.

Agreed. This isn't something you want to bring up right away, but you can't bring it up last minute, either. June is a very sought after time as far as vacations go. As a new grad and a new employee, your request would not be a priority. Definitely negotiate for this if they make you an offer as it's not likely to be approved afterwards. It may cost you offers, as well.

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Been there,done that has 33 years experience as a ASN, RN.

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If and when you are offered the position then, any negotiation as to start time and pre-planned vacations will be addressed.

Edited by Been there,done that

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Double-Helix has 9 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in PICU, Sedation/Radiology, PACU.

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Since they haven't actually paid for it, can they change the dates? Either sooner- in the next couple of months- or postpone until the fall?

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16 Posts; 523 Profile Views

Absolutely let them know about pre-existing plans that were in the making before you were contacted about the position. Life goes on; nobody sits by the phone with it on hold pending a call that might not even happen. They will understand and will appreciate you giving them a heads-up.

That being said, exactly how long is the trip? The length might be somewhat of a deal-breaker especially when current staff have been waiting an entire year for a vacation. They might suggest (if they are contemplating bringing you onboard) that your start date begin after you return...however, I don't foresee them holding a position for a new grad for several months. But, who knows?

If nothing has been paid for, consider having the gift-givers change it for something else...I know that sounds tacky but it's hard for new grad nurses to land jobs these days. You don't want to blow your opportunity. Have a full discussion about this with the person giving the interview so you'll know what you need to do.

It's two and a half weeks. I was also wondering if I should ask for a pool position, which I think might be a good way to get that time off. I believe this hospital allows pool to select their work days each month , so I was thinking I could just not pick up shifts for those 2.5 weeks. But IDK if that is a good idea, or even possible?

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Sour Lemon has 9 years experience.

3 Followers; 4,313 Posts; 31,827 Profile Views

It's two and a half weeks. I was also wondering if I should ask for a pool position, which I think might be a good way to get that time off. I believe this hospital allows pool to select their work days each month , so I was thinking I could just not pick up shifts for those 2.5 weeks. But IDK if that is a good idea, or even possible?

Pool is typically not available to new grads, and it would be a horrible idea for a new grad to accept a pool position even if it were available.

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16 Posts; 523 Profile Views

Pool is typically not available to new grads, and it would be a horrible idea for a new grad to accept a pool position even if it were available.

Thanks for that information, I did not know that. Why shouldn't a new grad accept a pool position? I just ask because many of my class mated accepted pool positions..

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Meriwhen is a ASN, BSN, RN and specializes in Psych ICU, addictions.

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Thanks for that information, I did not know that. Why shouldn't a new grad accept a pool position? I just ask because many of my class mated accepted pool positions..

Because when you're in the pool, you're expected to know what you're doing AND function with little to no assistance.

Pool nursing is the not the best place to learn New Grad Nursing 101--there's not enough stability. Just when you're getting settled into 4 East, they throw you into 2 South, so now on top of learning about time management, delegation, and all those other first year skills, you're now figuring out dealing with a new unit, new staff, new routines, and possibly even a new specialty/subspecialty. Next week (or even next day!), it may be another new unit. And so on.

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