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Interview with a pain clinic- red flags?

Interview   (15,519 Views | 26 Replies)

1,673 Profile Views; 17 Posts

Hi all, I am a new grad and I have an interview soon for an ambulatory surgery/pain management clinic. The hours are great, the guy seemed very positive on the phone, and this could be a real opportunity. However, in researching the facility online, I found bad reviews- mainly complaints about wait times, rude doctors, etc. I already know some pain clinics have a bad rap, and now I have concerns about this job.

Can anyone give me some key questions to ask in an interview that would raise red flags? What is the most diplomatic way to ask about poor patient satisfaction? What should a newbie nurse watch out for in one of these clinics? Thanks!

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needshaldol specializes in Pain management, Med/Surg.

425 Posts; 4,250 Profile Views

Difficult to help as you do not say what prior patients had to say. Remember people who have chronic pain are "different". I am not saying that they do not have pain. All the medications cause their brain to behave differently. And often they have no clue of this.

I worked in pain for 15 years and it was the best job I ever had in nursing. But, the pain clinic was small so maybe that made a difference. Non of the staff left. There was absolutely no turn over. This was a high tech clinic where we not only treated chronic pain with meds, but we did lots of nerve blocks and surgical implants. I would suggest seeing how the turnover is as that is often helpful. And remember, many, not all, but many pain patients are just different due to the emotional component of being in pain and the drugs.

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heron has 40 years experience as a ASN, RN and specializes in Hospice.

1 Follower; 2,557 Posts; 39,109 Profile Views

Also keep in mind that online review sites tend to attract people with complaints ... people having positive experiences seldom go to the trouble of posting a review.

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17 Posts; 1,673 Profile Views

Thank you, needshaldol. The "reviews" were on a few different websites, and were just polls about satisfaction, wait times, etc. I didn't see a lot of free response. But out of about 4 such sites with 10-20 responses each, the place only had a 30-40% approval (mostly directed at the lead doctor). But I realize that people usually only write reviews when they are unsatisfied, you usually don't hear from the happy patients on the internet.

Thank you for a pain nurse's perspective. I'll keep an open mind. This would be great experience in procedural care, which I really want to get into.

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17 Posts; 1,673 Profile Views

You wrote that just as I was responding, heron. You are right! Thanks!

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merlee has 36 years experience.

1,246 Posts; 13,670 Profile Views

No doubt that in general, people who are unhappy tend to generate much more of the reviews. You should be asking about the rate of turnover in the staff, how much the practice has grown over the last 3-5 years, why the position you are applying for is available.

What is the patient greivance process? People who have chronic pain, as with many chronic illnesses, can develop very negative atitudes about life.

I have diabetes, diabetic neuropathy, and sciatica, among my diagnoses, and on any given day can be depressed about any and all of it. I hope I am not developing a miserable personality to go along with it all.

Best wishes!

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whd13b has 5 years experience and specializes in Med/surg, Telemetry/PCU, Bone & Joint.

55 Posts; 2,169 Profile Views

Nursing jobs for recent grads are not as easy to come by as they used to be. My advice to you is to not mention anything about what you read. No matter how diplomatic you are, it will put your interviewer on the defense. It's a job and your foot in the door toward your nursing career. Knock them dead on the interview, land the job, and if it is truly that bad, at least you are employed in the field until you find something else.

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skulskcc01 specializes in N/A.

67 Posts; 2,478 Profile Views

Nursing jobs for recent grads are not as easy to come by as they used to be. My advice to you is to not mention anything about what you read. No matter how diplomatic you are, it will put your interviewer on the defense. It's a job and your foot in the door toward your nursing career. Knock them dead on the interview, land the job, and if it is truly that bad, at least you are employed in the field until you find something else.

I agree completely.

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240 Posts; 6,035 Profile Views

Nursing jobs for recent grads are not as easy to come by as they used to be. My advice to you is to not mention anything about what you read. No matter how diplomatic you are, it will put your interviewer on the defense. It's a job and your foot in the door toward your nursing career. Knock them dead on the interview, land the job, and if it is truly that bad, at least you are employed in the field until you find something else.

I disagree. It's important to have your first job be a good experience. Nursing Jobs aren't incredibly hard to come by everywhere. Even if jobs are difficult to find in your area you want to make good choices especially this early in your job history. Putting value on your skills and trying to find a good fit for them is never a bad idea, especially in a bad economy it's better to be percieved as an applicant with choices who isn't deperate to work just anywhere.

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whd13b has 5 years experience and specializes in Med/surg, Telemetry/PCU, Bone & Joint.

55 Posts; 2,169 Profile Views

I would definitely debate the current job prospectus for newly graduated RN's with you. I stand by my assertions that in this economy and job market, if a job is offered to you (that you applied for), take it and then with time, evaluate whether or not you want to stay or leave. If you decide to leave, at least your able to pay your bills until you find something else.

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patekgtech has 25 years experience and specializes in Focusing on Epidemiology.

22 Posts; 1,015 Profile Views

According to the DEA. Make sure the Pain clinic is legit. Do they only deal in cash. Is the Pharmacy conveniently next door. Are people lined up around the building very early before opening hours. Is the office run like a fast food joint, get them and get them out quickly mentality. Are the MD's only prescribing just 2 to 3 medications only. DEA has been Busting a Number of these "Pain Clinics" and acquiring the MD's assets. So be careful where you work. No matter how good they Pay! You worked too hard to get that License. If you think I'm joking or being unrealistic, then go ahead and take your chances. Visiting hours are on every other Sunday with the Feds, they aren't as Nice As The State!

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skulskcc01 specializes in N/A.

67 Posts; 2,478 Profile Views

I disagree. It's important to have your first job be a good experience. Nursing jobs aren't incredibly hard to come by everywhere. Even if jobs are difficult to find in your area you want to make good choices especially this early in your job history. Putting value on your skills and trying to find a good fit for them is never a bad idea, especially in a bad economy it's better to be percieved as an applicant with choices who isn't deperate to work just anywhere.
In my area and many others (according to many posts on this website) the job market isn't as hoppin' as it use to be. The poster clearly stated she was interested in working in a pain management clinic. If the interview goes well and it is a reputable pain clinic then take the job. If down the road you see poor patient care then quit.

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