Studing Nursing in Australia

  1. hi,

    i'm planning to study nursing in australia and have 2 options:

    first option:
    1st year at tafe for certificate iv in health (nursing)
    2 yrs 6 months at university
    total: 3 yrs 6 months

    second option:
    3 years months at university
    total: 3 years

    but in the first option, i can be registered as an enrolled nurse. my question is do you think it will be worth spending 6 months extra to be an enrolled nurse and work as an enrolled nurse while i study my bachelors in university (of course part time work).

    or should i go directly to university and save 6 months?
  2. Visit seemad profile page

    About seemad

    Joined: Apr '07; Posts: 4

    11 Comments

  3. by   lifes_a_beach
    I would go directly to University. It all depends on what University you pick - I would look at uni's with long clinical prac's so that you do feel comfortable as a new RN grad. Im in my last year and our uni is fantastic in that aspect so I never felt the need to do that. If for example the universities that you are looking at studying at only have limited clinical experience then that might be an idea to do your enrolled first. But I would honestly go to uni straight up..the Hospitals offer graduate programs when you finish to try to make that transition from student to RN easier.
    I work as a Carer (AIN) in a nursing home which is great for communication skills, time managment, dealing with death and dying and you dont need any formal qualifications if you are a nursing student and they are always looking for people. That is another option....hope this helps. Good luck
  4. by   AngeB
    Well I must agree that going straight to University is the best option.

    I currently work as an Enrolled Nurse in Australia. I studied through TAFE appro. 7 years ago and now am doing second year at University towards a bachelor of Nursing degree. So I'm speaking from experience.

    It won't actually save you any time because after you finish your 3 and half years at TAFE, you'll need to do approx another 2 years at Uni, which will in effect be 5 and a half years of studying.

    You can work in an aged care facility while you study, which will give you a very good start. In my opinion every student would benefit from working in aged care before graduating... there is so much to learn from working hands on, with your head out of the books!!
  5. by   seemad
    Hi AngeB,

    Thank you for your reply.

    I think you mis-understood my question. The TAFE is only for 1 year (and I'm eligible to register as an EN after 1 year) and then it is integrated with University for Bachelors of Nursing (for RN) for another 2.5 years. So it makes 3.5 years in total. On the other hand, if I go directly to uni, i just have to study for 3 years (as compared to 3.5 yrs in first case) but I won't have an oppurtunity to get myself registered as EN and cannot work as a Nurse.

    My point is that if I choose first option and become an EN, can I work along with my studies in Uni to help fund my studies?

    I'd welcome all suggestions. And if I don't choose first option and go directly to the Uni, what option do I have to work to fund my studies?
  6. by   Grace Oz
    When you're talking about funding your studies, do you not qualify for HECCS? If you don't, then I'd reccommend you adopt option 1. At least that way you'll have an income while you attend uni.

    Aaahhh, and they laugh at me when I advocate the way we trained "back in the day!" lol
    No worries about funding our training then. We got PAID to become nurses! AND ... we lived in the nurses quarters for minimal board. AND ... had a ball in the process!
    I wish you all the very best whichever option you choose.
  7. by   lifes_a_beach
    Grace Oz
    I might be a bit weird but when I hear about about the all those great stories of what you nurses got up to living and working together kind of makes me think that we miss out a little these days with Uni training. There is way too much emphasis these days on "theory" and not enough on real life "clinical knowledge" Anyways thats just my 2cents lol...Keep Advocating!!
  8. by   seemad
    Thanks for your reply Grace Oz and lifes_a_beach

    Is it easy to find part-times jobs as an EN?

    I'll be studying at Box Hill Tafe, Melbourne for a year (and i'll be eligible to register as an EN) and then move to Deakin to continue my Bachelors for RN.

    I had someone suggesting to me to work as a Carer. Any inputs will be helpful..
  9. by   lifes_a_beach
    I really believe that working as a carer has been invaluable. You learn how to interact with others (residents/pts and others in the health care team), how to manage your time (which is a big big lesson in nursing) and improve upon your basic nursing skills such as showering, bed baths, feedings etc.
    I used to say that I never wanted to work in aged care while I was studying and although it is physically and mentally draining at times I wouldnt want another job. Im in my 3rd year and have only been working as an AIN for 4 months but love it and have learnt a lot. I would really recommend it! Also the cash is good and for me graduating this year it was a really good career move as I can put them down as clinical referees for next year.
    Go for it I say!
    Good luck
  10. by   JoMc
    there are a couple of pro's and con's for both options.

    i had to do my cert iv just to get into uni and so spent 1 yr doing that at tafe. i was then accepted into uni and was given the first six months off in credit for having my div 2. however, doing your div 2 really does give you some great basic skills - personal care, showering, feeding, transferring, using lifting equipment etc and although this is covered in uni, it is in my opinion rushed over and you are not taught these very basic but important skills properly. i keep referring back to my div 2 teaching when i need to call on these skills.

    once you have completed your second year of uni, you can in fact apply to become a div 2. so if you go directly to uni, you could work as a pca and then a div 2 from begining of your third year.

    apart from getting the fist six months credit for uni, i also got given credits for 1 elective subject per semester and let me tell you that was worth its weight in gold and really helped to take the pressure off.

    im sure the above will apply to you as i think most victorian uni's offer a similar thing for div 2's.

    good luck with your decision - either way you go, you will come out of it a great nurse if you knuckle down, engage in the topics and make the very most of the limited clinical placements you get.

    jo




    Quote from seemad
    hi,

    i'm planning to study nursing in australia and have 2 options:

    first option:
    1st year at tafe for certificate iv in health (nursing)
    2 yrs 6 months at university
    total: 3 yrs 6 months

    second option:
    3 years months at university
    total: 3 years

    but in the first option, i can be registered as an enrolled nurse. my question is do you think it will be worth spending 6 months extra to be an enrolled nurse and work as an enrolled nurse while i study my bachelors in university (of course part time work).

    or should i go directly to university and save 6 months?
  11. by   Superdot2001
    Hi! I just wanted to point out that different states in Australia and different universities all have different regulations about how much credit you get for being an EN and/or an AIN when you're doing your BN. You really need to speak to someone from Victoria/Melbourne who knows the ropes because it sounds somewhat different to NSW.
    I think you would be better off going straight to uni to do your BN. A lot of hospitals will employ you as a 2nd year BN student to work as an AIN which is all good experience and practice. As someone else has also written, you can get work in aged care facilities quite easily when you're studying at uni. But, the workload is pretty heavy and you have to weigh up working with your study load.
    I'm in my 3rd year as a mature aged student and am loving it, and although I love to study (weird, aren't I??) it leaves very little time for other activities. I guess you can get away with less study if you just want to "pass" your exams, but I encourage everyone to study as much as possible because I know I would rather be nursed by someone who got more than just a "pass" in their exams and knows what they're talking about!! Sorry, for getting off the track a bit ..... am just passionate about nursing and want to encourage you young people to be just as passionate (or even more passionate) and see nursing as a career and not just a job. I always think of it from the patient's point of view, that is, if I were the patient .... Anyway, Good luck to you and to everyone else in their studies.
  12. by   ProudofmyNursingart
    This, if you are still trying to figure out what you are going to do, may help somewhat.

    In SA and Queensland they NO LONGER OFFER Certificate IV in health. It has been changed to Diploma of Nursing.

    It has also gone from a 12 month full time course to 18 months full time as you are doing medications in there now. If you pass this, and you need to, you will be registered to give medication through IV and IM. Not just oral and subcut.

    I am in Vic and studying my EN through SA. The course is about to be restructured again now!

    Once you have completed your new EN course you get the first 12 months off of the Div 1 course.

    In Vic they still offer Cert IV to be done in 12 months BUT YOU ARE NOT QUALIFIED TO GIVE ANY MEDICATIONS. This is done by a seperate course of 6 months post registration. Such a hard way to go about it. Finish study. Work your hours up. Pay for extra course and do more hours.
    We need a better system here in Victoria so that is why I chose to do mine through SA.
    Last edit by ProudofmyNursingart on Jul 17, '07
  13. by   Levin
    It has also gone from a 12 month full time course to 18 months full time as you are doing medications in there now. If you pass this, and you need to, you will be registered to give medication through IV and IM. Not just oral and subcut.
    Are you sure you can give it * IV *

    Because I've just obtained medications endorsement and IV is the one route that is not allowed to us.
    We can do topical(allsorts) SC and IM. But not IV.

    Levin
    Last edit by Levin on Jul 19, '07 : Reason: Spwelling ellors

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