Questions regarding work conditions in Australia

  1. Well I got the bug to look into migrating to Australia, so found this website by doing searches on Australian nursing.

    A few questions...how are work conditions? I'm an RN in California, USA. I work primarily ER. I think we enjoy a broad scope of practice and do find my work rewarding. Is it the same in Australia? Do we start our own IV's, assist in invasive procedures, covered under protocols, etc? Is my ACLS, BLS, PALS and TNCC (Trauma cert) required and transferrable? Is there anything that a nurse who has practiced in both countries can tell me is specifically or drastically different?

    Also, how is the nurse to patient ratio? Is it governed by any laws or does it vary from facility to facility? In CA we have a 1:4 ratio in ER. Other states vary drastically.

    Also, I'm an Associates degree RN here. Will that effect my level in AU? I have all my paperwork downloaded from the QLD nursing council and plan on getting that submitted for the final say, but any feedback is appreciated. I've found conflicting information in forums. It seems that the "Enrolled Nurse" is similar to our Vocational nurses in the US. Realistically, I could not professionally take a step backwards. I'm taking classes here towards my BSN, plan on continuing that in AU if I go. But can't go backwards. I would be professionally frustrated and that's not a direction I'm interested in.

    I'm interested in migrating for the cultural experience. I want to see what it's like "down under". I love to scuba dive so obviously that's a plus, the GBR so close. But obviously, I need to support myself and family so fulfillment in my profession is pretty important.

    Finally:bowingpur, I'm a bit perplexed by this site. It states to post threads regarding general nursing in "International Forum" but that link continually circles me back to here. So is THIS the International Forum? I'm not computer illiterate and am actually an active participant in many web forums. This site has be going in circles...literally.

    Well now that THAT is out of the way.....Any help on my question is appreciated!
  2. Visit DiverChick71 profile page

    About DiverChick71

    Joined: May '09; Posts: 6
    ER nurse
    Specialty: 14 year(s) of experience in ER, PACU, TELE, M/S, ICU.

    4 Comments

  3. by   Silverdragon102
    We ask any questions regarding foreign requirements are posted in the international forum which this forum (Australian and NZ) is a sub forum to. International forum

    The end decision regarding training is up to the state nursing board but I don't think ADN will meet requirements but a lot depends on what hours both clinical and theory your transcripts show. Your training has to meet similar training to the Australian nurse which I believe is 3 years (I am sure someone will correct me)
  4. by   ceridwyn
    Yep, it is three years at university....We are to go under one Australian registration board next year. so once assessed you will be able to work in all areas of Australia without that dreaded which state, now where I'm I again thing

    This website is the national assessment place, Australian Nursing council and Midwifery for overseas trained nurses. Skilled migration places, it is of my understanding that you must me a Registered Nurse Division One to be considered for this.
    Here is the website http://www.anmc.org.au/.

    I have worked with US nurses that work as Enrolled nurses, their were ADN's in the US. Our National system a Enrolled NUrse ....there is no difference they work in all areas start IVS etc. they just don't have the expense of going to uni, and their pay is a bit lower (I think)
  5. by   DiverChick71
    Oh I'm not interested at all in enrolled. Perhaps I have the wrong idea, as I'm not THERE and not familiar with the system. But to me...that's a step back. I have a great career here. And I'm already actively working on my US BSN anyway.

    I heard from QLD nursing council today, they suggested that I send in my application for assessment to see if I qualify for Registered, as I do have college hours other than my ADN. So I guess I'll do that, but if I can't become registered I'll finish up my BSN here in the US. I'm not in any hurry...just wanted something different. I just can't fathom taking a step back or less pay.
  6. by   talaxandra
    Quote from DiverChick71
    A few questions...how are work conditions? I'm an RN in California, USA. I work primarily ER. I think we enjoy a broad scope of practice and do find my work rewarding. Is it the same in Australia? Do we start our own IV's, assist in invasive procedures, covered under protocols, etc? Is my ACLS, BLS, PALS and TNCC (Trauma cert) required and transferrable? Is there anything that a nurse who has practiced in both countries can tell me is specifically or drastically different?

    Also, how is the nurse to patient ratio? Is it governed by any laws or does it vary from facility to facility? In CA we have a 1:4 ratio in ER. Other states vary drastically.

    Also, I'm an Associates degree RN here. Will that effect my level in AU?
    You'll find the answers to many of these questions by looking through other threads in this forum, particularly this and this.

    I haven't worked overseas so I can't give you any specific information about differences in practice.

    Nurse initiation of protocols varies from ward to ward, hospital to hospital and also depends on your level of qualification. ICU nurses, for example, have considerably more latitude with initiation than even very experiences floor nurses. I don't work in Cas so I'm not sure about the details you asked about. In general though nurses here do most of the care and have correspondingly fewer patients: no resp therapists, and though there are ECG techs to do routine ECS and phlebotomists to do routine bloods, they only work set hours. Out of hours it's us or the docs.

    The only Australian state with mandated ratios is Victoria. The actual nurse/patient ratio varies depending on what kind of ward and in what acuity of hospital or department you work in - ICU has 1:1 for intubated patients, while small country hospitals have 1:7, 1:8 or 1:15 depending on the shift and the type of facility.

    Enrolled nurses (Division 2 in Victoria) have a smaller scope of practice, less opportunity for advancement, fewer responsibilities, and lower rates of pay. If you're the equivalent of a Division 1 Registered Nurse in America then that should be what you're qualified at here, regardless of what kind of degree you have.

    Good luck

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