Nursing Requirements for UK Nurses

  1. Hello everyone!
    I am an RN in the US seeking my four year nursing degree. I have a project that is due soon and I was hoping someone could answer a few of my questions. How do the citizens of the UK receive their healthcare? Do you have insurance that pays, do you pay out of pocket, do you have government funded programs? Also, how does one become a nurse in the UK? Are there any 2 year programs? How long is the nursing program? Do you have to take a test or "boards" to become an RN? One other question. What are the major healthcare problems that your country faces today? Thank you so much to anyone who can help me!!
    Lindsay
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  2. Visit lwestbrooks profile page

    About lwestbrooks

    Joined: Apr '05; Posts: 3

    7 Comments

  3. by   suzanne4
    The residents of the UK are covered under a government-wide system, where everything is taken care of but the waiting list for many things can be quite long. There is also a very active private pay set-up, one of the biggest areas for that is an area called "Harley Street." You may want to look that up on your computer. But of course this paln is contributed heavily by the tax-payers. Their rates are higher than ours.

    There are no 2 year RN degrees. They do what is now called a "specialist" program, 18 months of general nursing, then 18 months of either maternal/peds, adult medicine, or mental health. That is why there is a problem for recent grads in the UK who wish to work in the US. They have to make up the additional hours.

    Hope that this gives you some insight............
  4. by   suzanne4
    The residents of the UK are covered under a government-wide system, where everything is taken care of but the waiting list for many things can be quite long. There is also a very active private pay set-up, one of the biggest areas for that is an area called "Harley Street." You may want to look that up on your computer. But of course this paln is contributed heavily by the tax-payers. Their rates are higher than ours.

    There are no 2 year RN degrees. They do what is now called a "specialist" program, 18 months of general nursing, then 18 months of either maternal/peds, adult medicine, or mental health. That is why there is a problem for recent grads in the UK who wish to work in the US. They have to make up the additional hours.

    They have to take a licensing exam, just like you do in the US. There are very few countires that don't require a specific exam, China and countires of the former Russian Republic, where once they receive their Diplomas from school, they can practice right away............

    Hope that this gives you some insight............
  5. by   lwestbrooks
    Suzanne-
    Thank you so much for your response. Do you know what the current "big" health care problems in the UK? EXamplebesity, diabetes, Medicaid/Medicare, etc?? Thanks again!!
    Lindsay

    Quote from suzanne4
    The residents of the UK are covered under a government-wide system, where everything is taken care of but the waiting list for many things can be quite long. There is also a very active private pay set-up, one of the biggest areas for that is an area called "Harley Street." You may want to look that up on your computer. But of course this paln is contributed heavily by the tax-payers. Their rates are higher than ours.

    There are no 2 year RN degrees. They do what is now called a "specialist" program, 18 months of general nursing, then 18 months of either maternal/peds, adult medicine, or mental health. That is why there is a problem for recent grads in the UK who wish to work in the US. They have to make up the additional hours.

    Hope that this gives you some insight............
  6. by   suzanne4
    Essentially the same as over here..............orthopedics comes to mind because of the time factor, it usually is quite a long wait to get in. That is why many of the Brits, who can afford it, are flying to Thailand, or other similar countries for the surgery.

    As long as diets are similar in nature, then similar problems are going to be found.
  7. by   Silverdragon102
    Quote from lwestbrooks
    Hello everyone!
    I am an RN in the US seeking my four year nursing degree. I have a project that is due soon and I was hoping someone could answer a few of my questions. How do the citizens of the UK receive their healthcare? Do you have insurance that pays, do you pay out of pocket, do you have government funded programs? Also, how does one become a nurse in the UK? Are there any 2 year programs? How long is the nursing program? Do you have to take a test or "boards" to become an RN? One other question. What are the major healthcare problems that your country faces today? Thank you so much to anyone who can help me!!
    Lindsay
    we in the UK contribute from our wage into a national health system but everyone who is entitled ie children, people on benefits for whatever reasons people with work permits and even royalty are entitled to the health system. It does get abused a lot as there are no set checks to ensure that the right people are getting the treatment although many more hospitals sre asking for either nhs number (similar to SSN) or national insurance number (which everyone over age 16 I believe recieves) Waiting lists are long but does vary to where you live.

    Nursing is approx 3 year course and you are evaluated and tested all the time, if you fail a test (I believe twice) you are asked to leave the course. I am sure someone who knows a bit more about that will correct me. You sit a final exam at the end of the course and if sucessful will pass and then pay to practice as a nusre. If you check out our governing body web site you may get more info from it re nursing it is www.nmc-uk.org

    Also ditto to what suzanne said.. similar health follows similar life styles
  8. by   madwife2002
    Hi,

    I agree with Suzanne and Anna. Like the US stroke is one of the major killers in this country, MI's, bowel cancer, breast cancer. Mrsa is a major problem.
    Sexually transmitted diseases are on the increase and Chlamydia is one of the worse with 1 in 8 young women under the age of 25 having contracted it.
    You can take out private health insurance if you want to but it is very expensive especially when you are already contributing to the NHS via NI payments. Having private insurance cuts out the waiting times.
    I have to say I was in NY last november and my friend who was travelling with me needed to go to the ER we had to wait over 3 hours to see a doctor, we had private health insurance yet the waiting times there were similar to the UK, which is free.
    Student nurses who are doing the diploma in nursing take 3 years to qualify they get paid a bursery of around $1000 per month during their training, if you choose to do the degree which also takes 3 years you dont get paid. All very complicated.
  9. by   lwestbrooks
    Thank you all so much for your help!! It is truly appreciated!
    Lindsay

    Quote from madwife2002
    Hi,

    I agree with Suzanne and Anna. Like the US stroke is one of the major killers in this country, MI's, bowel cancer, breast cancer. Mrsa is a major problem.
    Sexually transmitted diseases are on the increase and Chlamydia is one of the worse with 1 in 8 young women under the age of 25 having contracted it.
    You can take out private health insurance if you want to but it is very expensive especially when you are already contributing to the NHS via NI payments. Having private insurance cuts out the waiting times.
    I have to say I was in NY last november and my friend who was travelling with me needed to go to the ER we had to wait over 3 hours to see a doctor, we had private health insurance yet the waiting times there were similar to the UK, which is free.
    Student nurses who are doing the diploma in nursing take 3 years to qualify they get paid a bursery of around $1000 per month during their training, if you choose to do the degree which also takes 3 years you dont get paid. All very complicated.

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