Nursing Internship Program

  1. Would a Nursing Internship Program be a good idea and viable instead of a possible 5 year BSN course?

    This would be a post-grad program after the 4 yr BSN course for 1st coursers and after a 2-3 year course for 2nd coursers.

    This would be patterned after the Internship program done for med. graduates where post-grads are mandated by law to serve in just one hospital for a minimal fee or almost free service for 1 year. Also, because of this law, Med Interns are actually getting all the basic procedures such as inserting IVs, Foley caths, NGTs, do wound care on their surgical rotations, do lumbar punctures for those w/ anesthesia rotations (under supervision of course) and other basic procedures.

    I just think that this is better than having a 5 year course or having nursing students rotate on diff. hospitals. Just 1 hospital for 1 full year and you rotate on all the hospital's Depts. On provincial hospitals as well for those graduating from Govt' schools just like what they make Gov't med graduates do.

    What do you guys think?
    Last edit by lawrence01 on Mar 3, '07
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    About lawrence01

    Joined: Aug '05; Posts: 4,785; Likes: 900

    12 Comments

  3. by   pinoy_guy
    personally I don't think so.

    I have handled some classes...and there is obviously an oversupply of students vis-a-vis cases.

    have you seen a single baby in a Nursery surrounded by 12 to 16 students?

    this is becoming the norm now. (and why the PRC is cracking down on the cases submitted for the NLE)

    even if you add 1 year to training, there wouldn't be enough cases to go around.

    even in government hospitals, where Nursing Schools jostle to get one of the prized, but limited, slots.

    I think the current setup is good: additional training is received upon being accepted by a hospital.

    if we have 40,000 examinees for the June NLE, and another 40,000 for December...that's 60,000 to 80,000 graduates per year. the 60,000 estimate is to account for the repeaters and the graduates of previous years.

    how in the Philippines do you find hospitals and cases for these many RNs?

    your proposal is feasible for Medical students, because they are few. less than 6,000 to 8,000 per exam? so 10,000 to 16,000 graduates per year?

    even with these many Medical graduates, I don't think everybody gets adequate training.

    my 2 cents.
  4. by   lawrence01
    Is this why it will be just better to just make it a 5 yr BSN course?

    I think this already being considered (the 5 yr BSN course and not the one I just personally proposed).

    Would it really make a diff.?
  5. by   pinoy_guy
    i think the answer is to limit the number of students to the actual number of patients/cases that the affiliate hospital can actually provide, not lengthen the period of study.

    the present situation is a glut of students (graduates), so much that we don't have jobs for them in the philippines.

    the result is a dilution of the skills required of a nurse.

    us hospitals have begun to notice.

    i predict us hospitals might start to limit schools from where they will get their nurses.

    the first few graduates of an inferior school might get into us hospitals, but if they don't have the needed skills, they'll make it harder for the other graduates from that school.

    i know of 2 cases where the us hospital asked the nurse to resign. their nurse managers are now wary of other applicants from their schools.

    if we don't learn to cut down on inferior schools...other countries are moving double time to fill the need.

    the "quick buck" is not the solution.
  6. by   Rep
    I used to remember in our time that each student has one or two patients to take care the whole 24 hours of clinicals of the whole week. We do everything and that is bedside nursing. And that is 24 hours per week for three whole years. That was back then.

    But the situation now is different.
  7. by   lawrence01
    Quote from Rep
    I used to remember in our time that each student has one or two patients to take care the whole 24 hours of clinicals of the whole week. We do everything and that is bedside nursing. And that is 24 hours per week for three whole years. That was back then.

    But the situation now is different.
    Yap. That is what I'm driving at. The medical Interns are in the hospital for 24 hours when on duty and they are on duty every 2 days at that that's why they get all cases and procedures by default and they even don't need to handle a certain number of cases or do a number of certain procedures w/c they need to submit to the PRC but they still have tons of those by default simply being in the hospital for 24 hours on duty and office hours for post duty and pre-duty and there are even hospitals where there is only duty and post duty rotations because of the lack of interns and resident doctors. They are literally vomiting on all those cases and procedures.

    But would it be feasible as pinoy_guy said ?
  8. by   gemini_star
    That would be a nice idea. Although one consideration is the proliferation of student nurses patient ratio in the hospital. There are so many students nurses out there and few hospitals to accommodate them. Before going to a nursing internship program, it's better to close those inferior nursing schools. There are many and the teachers of these schools are not teaching well also.
  9. by   lawrence01
    That would be nice. Putting a cap on he number of students to be accepted would also be a good consideration besides from closing down inferior schools.

    But there is already a law that a school can be closed from if it has performed poorly on 3 consecutive NLEs. I wonder if it is being actually followed.

    CHED should also have much stricter guidelines to prevent mushrooming of nursing schools.
  10. by   gemini_star
    Quote from lawrence01
    That would be nice. Putting a cap on he number of students to be accepted would also be a good consideration besides from closing down inferior schools.

    But there is already a law that a school can be closed from if it has performed poorly on 3 consecutive NLEs. I wonder if it is being actually followed.

    CHED should also have much stricter guidelines to prevent mushrooming of nursing schools.
    Yep that would be excellent plus a rigid interview and with highest priority on those who got a high score in board exams or high grades from school. Now that would be competitive and a great motivation for rich, slackers, and cheaters to be serious in nursing. :wink2: According to hearsay, that rule is not followed anymore which is exclusive for nursing only. You have unlimited takes on the exam.
  11. by   Rep
    Quote from gemini_star
    Yep that would be excellent plus a rigid interview and with highest priority on those who got a high score in board exams or high grades from school. Now that would be competitive and a great motivation for rich, slackers, and cheaters to be serious in nursing. :wink2: According to hearsay, that rule is not followed anymore which is exclusive for nursing only. You have unlimited takes on the exam.
    Used to be before...
  12. by   RNHawaii34
    honestly, i don't know what to say..i think they need to weed out a lot of nursing schools in our country...i noticed when i came back to finish my bsn in 2004, that, a lot of new student nurses are not even fit to be in nursing...during my time in the early 90's, it is hard to get in the nursing school, i mean, you have to have a good grade in order for you to get in the second year, have at least a total average of 80.00, and no lower than that...plus, there is a so called deliveration, if you don't pass, you might as well quit and shift into a different course. my god, it is very scary to have those "nurses" working in the hospitals..who are not equip with good basic nursing skills, critical thinking, and even simple assessment skills, plus the trend now is that you have to pay for the "training" and wait until you get absorb in the job...that is risky, i mean, would you really want a nurse who didn't have any proper training to take care of your baby? i didn't think so..5 years of bsn sounds pretty long..i think they should stick with 4 years..even the second coursers should have 4 years, or at least need to get more science related, or nursing related class...i understand everybody wants to leave the philippines for greater pasteur, but many, many don't realize how hard it is to work in the united states, and even in other countries without proper training. the completion of cases for prc is also hard to complete..i mean, it was nerve wracking to complete all those requirements. with many nursing schools now adays, everybody is scrambling to finish their cases on time, i mean a lot of graduating students didn't even complete their cases right before graduation. about schools, i dunno, i think each schools need to train their nurses really hard, and not give just a passing grade...because when you get to united states, they don't even care if your from up or some abc school, as long as you are comfortable with doing your job, and you can actually do your job, then it shouldn't be an issue. i think ched should do something now, at least change the rules, increase the nursing standards, weed out those poor performing nursing schools, should i go on and on?
  13. by   winterfairy
    During my 2nd yr in nursing the dean of our school told us that there will be a selective retention policy, students need to achieve a certain average grade(85%), however when we reached our 3rd yr we expected the number of students to go down since not all were able to maintain the average grade required, But the selective retention was not implemented, my batch is composed of around 1000+ students when we inquired what happened to the policy the dean just replied : "Business is Business!!" ...
  14. by   lawrence01
    Quote from winterfairy
    During my 2nd yr in nursing the dean of our school told us that there will be a selective retention policy, students need to achieve a certain average grade(85%), however when we reached our 3rd yr we expected the number of students to go down since not all were able to maintain the average grade required, But the selective retention was not implemented, my batch is composed of around 1000+ students when we inquired what happened to the policy the dean just replied : "Business is Business!!" ...
    I think that answers a lot...

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