American nursing

  1. Hi! I'm a college student in the UK and highly confused about the way the structure of the qualifications in America!!! Over here it's reasonably simple, such as...DipHE(diploma of Higher education - from which i gather is the same as ADN) and BScNurs(BAchelor's degree in nursing - equiv. BSN) but what about how the university's work the programmes and the finance etc etc. anyone shed any light on my situation?
    Thank you!!!
    Hannah
    :studyowl:
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    About fit_bit2003

    Joined: Mar '06; Posts: 4

    8 Comments

  3. by   traumaRUs
    Hi and welcome. I'll move your post to a forum where you'll get more responses.
  4. by   Christinmomof3nrs2be
    I don't quite understand your question. If you could explain it more, I'll try to help, (if I can LOL).
  5. by   cariad
    you will have a hard time getting anyone from the uk or the us to tell you the differencse, you need the american nurses to tell you what they nedd to qualify and the length of time. i am over here and still cant understand it.
    apparently they can get an associates degree in nursing in just 2 years, but they also take pre-requisites for some courses, maybe an american can tell you what it all means.
    some nurses take years to become qualified as they do it very part time, not at all like in britain.
  6. by   Silverdragon102
    would probably be better to post in the international forum not UK forum,
  7. by   ZASHAGALKA
    Quote from cariad
    you will have a hard time getting anyone from the uk or the us to tell you the differencse, you need the american nurses to tell you what they nedd to qualify and the length of time. i am over here and still cant understand it.
    apparently they can get an associates degree in nursing in just 2 years, but they also take pre-requisites for some courses, maybe an american can tell you what it all means.
    some nurses take years to become qualified as they do it very part time, not at all like in britain.
    the two yr programs require the pre-reqs first. normally about 6-8 classes, or about 1.5 yrs before getting into a 2 yr program. so, the two yr programs end up being more like 3.5 yr programs. and that is an assoc. degree.

    the bach programs are 4 yr programs and the pre-reqs are part of the curriculum. in addition to the adn, they have training in theory, research, management, a little more in-depth pathophys, and a more 'liberal arts' educational focus.

    both types of programs can have long waiting lists, but because the adn programs have a more 'as you go' system of collecting pre-reqs, the process and the waiting for a spot in the actual nursing programs seems more drawn out, from what i can tell.

    both adn and bsn have to pass the same exam, the nclex-rn and that grants the title, rn, to both. but, the bsn degree tends to be more useful in 'away from the bedside' jobs, such as management and research.

    if you are interested in an adn program, every program has a list of the specific pre-reqs they require, and while they are similar, they can sometimes be very different in the particulars (we won't take math 105 from another college, you have to take math 107 with us). and like i said, enrollment in a bsn programs tends to cover the 'pre-reqs' (that adns need before applying for the actual adn nursing program) as part of the course curriculum for the 4 yr bsn program.

    ~faith,
    timothy.
    Last edit by ZASHAGALKA on Aug 21, '06
  8. by   cariad
    told you that it was hard for us brits to understand !
  9. by   traumaRUs
    The other issue (very big one) is the shortage of instructors which often results in several years of waiting to get into ANY nursing school.
  10. by   fit_bit2003
    Wish i hadn't asked now!!!! lol, its completely different. think im glad to be in UK tryin to get into nursing! hell of a lot simpler!
    Thanks guys, i've been enlightened!
    han

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