Do you use Spanish on the job????

  1. Hi! I'm not in nursing school, yet...just taking my gen. ed's, but I'm wondering, with so many spanish-speaking residents living in Indiana now, do you find yourselves needing knowlegde of the spanish language at work? I know Methodist employs interpreters (at least in the emergency department). What are your experiences? Thanks!
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  2. Visit mchup profile page

    About mchup

    Joined: Jan '05; Posts: 18; Likes: 1

    7 Comments

  3. by   Nurse Ratched
    I use my imperfect Spanish on the psych ward. It's fascinating to try and do with someone who is psychotic and/or intoxicated...
  4. by   MikeLPN
    Ayyy Caramba!
  5. by   unknown99
    I live in Ohio, and do find in the small area that I am in, the need to speak Spanish on almost a daily basis. With what Spanish I do know and the handy Taber's with me, I can carry on enough of a conversation to figure out what the patient needs.
    Of course, we always have interpreters also, if needed.
  6. by   VivaLasViejas
    I'm fairly fluent, although I don't speak Spanish as well as I understand, read, and write it. I have a couple of friends on the housekeeping staff at work who keep me on my toes, as they will ONLY talk to me in Spanish, and of course I use it on the job pretty frequently. What gets me is when I've been talking with someone in Spanish for a while, it takes me a few minutes to stop speaking English with a Spanish accent!! Amuses my co-workers to no end..... :uhoh21:
  7. by   URO-RN
    Quote from mjlrn97
    I'm fairly fluent, although I don't speak Spanish as well as I understand, read, and write it. I have a couple of friends on the housekeeping staff at work who keep me on my toes, as they will ONLY talk to me in Spanish, and of course I use it on the job pretty frequently. What gets me is when I've been talking with someone in Spanish for a while, it takes me a few minutes to stop speaking English with a Spanish accent!! Amuses my co-workers to no end..... :uhoh21:
    That's pretty neat. I am a native speaker and sometimes my wires get crossed. I sometimes think in English and write in Spanish or vice-versa. I have to double check everything or make sure that what I am saying makes sense. :chuckle
  8. by   purplemania
    In Texas it is hard to work without knowing some Spanish. HOWEVER, be aware that if someone other than a certified translator assists an individual in getting consents signed, then that individual is putting themself at risk in case the patient states later they did not understand what you said. We have translator phones to do patient education, get consents signed, etc. That is reality. I personally feel people should learn the language of the dominant culture. I travel a lot and do not expect people to know English everywhere I go.
  9. by   mchup
    Thanks so much to all of you for your input! I guess I should stick it out in my quest to learn to speak Spanish. It's awfully hard for me to concentrate on it when I feel that I should be studying the cardiovascular system, or endocrine system in ANP. Anyway, thanks again! You all are great!

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