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In Hard Times, Lured Into Trade School and Debt

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by D85619 D85619 (New Member) New Member

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Even though this article is not talking about any of the MA,DA,ST, or LVN/LPN programs but i still think its a good read.

i put the link and i copy and paste the story just in case.If someone else already posted this my bad.

http://finance.yahoo.com/college-education/article/109081/in-hard-times-lured-into-trade-school-and-debt

One fast–growing American industry has become a conspicuous beneficiary of the recession: for–profit colleges and trade schools.

At institutions that train students for careers in areas like health care, computers and food service, enrollments are soaring as people anxious about weak job prospects borrow aggressively to pay tuition that can exceed $30,000 a year.

But the profits have come at substantial taxpayer expense while often delivering dubious benefits to students, according to academics and advocates for greater oversight of financial aid. Critics say many schools exaggerate the value of their degree programs, selling young people on dreams of middle–class wages while setting them up for default on untenable debts, low–wage work and a struggle to avoid poverty. And the schools are harvesting growing federal student aid dollars, including Pell grants awarded to low–income students.

"If these programs keep growing, you're going to wind up with more and more students who are graduating and can't find meaningful employment," said Rafael I. Pardo, a professor at Seattle University School of Law and an expert on educational finance. "They can't generate income needed to pay back their loans, and they're going to end up in financial distress."

For–profit trade schools have long drawn accusations that they overpromise and underdeliver, but the woeful economy has added to the industry's opportunities along with the risks to students, according to education experts. They say these schools have exploited the recession as a lucrative recruiting device while tapping a larger pool of federal student aid.

Edited by TheCommuter
added quote blocks; cannot paste entire article per copyright

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TheCommuter has 10 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Case mgmt., rehab, (CRRN), LTC & psych.

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I know of a school that continually churns new culinary arts graduates (a.k.a. chefs) into the local job market every 6 months or so. The tuition for this program is nearly $20,000. I suspect that the admissions representatives at this trade school are making lofty promises that they possibly cannot keep.

Restaurant meals are pricey to people who have had their hours cut at their places of employment. Unfortunately, fine dining is not a priority in a slumping economy. When people are short on cash, they begin to eat more meals at home, which reduces the demand for dining out at restaurants. As a result, the demand for chefs is reduced.

Similar things can be said about the medical assisting program, which is one of the most graduated programs in the U.S. More people are being graduated when the jobs simply are not available.

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Emergency RN has 30 years experience and specializes in ED, CTSurg, IVTeam, Oncology.

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I remember reading an article years ago, when the economy was good (under Clinton) that even then, the culinary schools industry was frowned upon for being predatory in their practices. They portrayed an image of strong financial success through the wielding of a spatula, with implied employment opportunities in upscale five star venues like top international hotels, resorts, and restaurants.

The reality of course, was far removed from that. Most graduates of those schools couldn't even find jobs in those fields, and of those that did, it was usually for pedestrian type diners and other minor food prep outlets, often at minimum wage. What hasn't helped of course, are those cable channel cooking shows and contests (like "Iron Chef") which gives the industry the sparkle and panache to attract attendees to these worthless academies. The US government should really investigate and clamp down on these tax payer expensed diploma mills.

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Moogie specializes in Gerontology, nursing education.

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One of the proprietary schools in my area constantly runs ads for its practical nursing program, citing "statistics" that claim that the demand for nurses will increase over 600% in the "next few years". The program charges about $30,000 for tuition and, worst of all, the largest health care employer in the community is no longer hiring LPNs because it is trying to get magnet status.

The best that the graduates of that program can probably expect is to be hired at clinics or LTC, both of which pay far less than hospital nursing.

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seasonednurse78 specializes in Med/Surg, Surgery.

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I was reading that article earlier today. It is amazing how so many people are being duped by schools. I have seen information through a local hospital's college offering a 2-year medical assistant program costing a huge amount of money. The sad thing is that medical assistants are only paid around 8 or 9 bucks an hour to work in a doctor's office or clinic in this area. If one is going to invest 2 years in an education, they sure would be better off going to nursing school.

Oh and let us not forget about those medical transcription schools that really suck people in with promises of being able to work at home, whenever you want and make big bucks! What a rip off! :mad:

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36,704 Posts; 96,715 Profile Views

My husband was a member of the Culinary Federation of America and had years of experience, yet he was lucky to get a job paying minimum wage where he had to provide his own equipment (knives). Being a "chef" is no different than being a "cook" when it comes to minimum wage pay.

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JenniferSews specializes in Professional Development Specialist.

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One of the proprietary schools in my area constantly runs ads for its practical nursing program, citing "statistics" that claim that the demand for nurses will increase over 600% in the "next few years". The program charges about $30,000 for tuition and, worst of all, the largest health care employer in the community is no longer hiring LPNs because it is trying to get magnet status.

The best that the graduates of that program can probably expect is to be hired at clinics or LTC, both of which pay far less than hospital nursing.

There are many ADN programs popping up in CO and the problem is the same for those nurses. I've often heard the "admissions counselors" referred to as used car salesmen. The tuition is outrageous and the jobs for new grads here are getting harder and harder to find.

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LoveMyBugs is a BSN, CNA, RN and specializes in Pediatrics.

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I know of a school that continually churns new culinary arts graduates (a.k.a. chefs) into the local job market every 6 months or so. The tuition for this program is nearly $20,000. I suspect that the admissions representatives at this trade school are making lofty promises that they possibly cannot keep.

Restaurant meals are pricey to people who have had their hours cut at their places of employment. Unfortunately, fine dining is not a priority in a slumping economy. When people are short on cash, they begin to eat more meals at home, which reduces the demand for dining out at restaurants. As a result, the demand for chefs is reduced.

Similar things can be said about the medical assisting program, which is one of the most graduated programs in the U.S. More people are being graduated when the jobs simply are not available.

Before I went back to school to become a RN, I used to manage a fast food resturant and we would get applications from the culinary school that was in the area all the time. We wouldn't hire them because the company that I worked for had it's own training program that they used for managment and didn't want to have to "retrain" someone who has thier degree in food service. The best we could do was crew member at minium wage.

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hope3456 is a ASN, RN and specializes in LTC, Psych, M/S.

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There are many ADN programs popping up in CO and the problem is the same for those nurses. I've often heard the "admissions counselors" referred to as used car salesmen. The tuition is outrageous and the jobs for new grads here are getting harder and harder to find.

So true, and if you look at the CO board here on allnurses you will see that people are still flocking to those programs......I'm sorry but a nursing degree is NOT worth being 50k in debt - and like you say, the hospitals are turning up their noses at new grads.

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DogWmn specializes in LTC Family Practice.

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It's not just the private trade schools either. Here in GA. a local CC is ADVERTISING for a Clinical Laboratory Assistant Certificate - it's a two term thingie. So I called to ask about it and what kind of job you would get and I got told Oh we just started the program and I don't know (this was from the head of the department:eek:). So I investigated further and called several hospitals and ask to talk with the Lab Manager and told him about the course and read him what classes were required and would he hire anyone with this certificate... NOPE:mad:. Another local CC is advertising in the paper with huge one page adds for the latest and greatest....Clinical Research Professional and they were targeting RN's and LPN's to take the course and become the "lab manager" for research projects...soooo I called UGA (home of the dawgs:rolleyes:) and talked with the head of the science dept. and read him the classes and asked if it was true that if I took the course could I become a "lab manager" of a research project...and you guessed it...a big NOOOOO.

What concerns me is not only the private trade schools but the state funded colleges are trying to jump on the health care band wagon churning out worthless certificates and degrees promising jobs:mad:. Neither one of these certificates will get you anything but in debt, yah it's not anywhere near what a private school would be, but people are desperate to find stable work and MY tax dollars are going to fund these scams.

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378 Posts; 4,661 Profile Views

A classmate of mines just took out a loan for $55,000 :eek::eek:for the nursing program at Samuel Merrit University in Oakland Ca. She was desperate after not being able to get into our public university program for 2 yrs.

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llg has 40 years experience as a PhD, RN and specializes in Nursing Professional Development.

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There are many ADN programs popping up in CO and the problem is the same for those nurses. I've often heard the "admissions counselors" referred to as used car salesmen. The tuition is outrageous and the jobs for new grads here are getting harder and harder to find.

The same thing has happened in my area.

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