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Immigration bill could jeopardize nurse recruiting

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by Brian Brian, ASN, RN (Member)

Brian has 16 years experience as a ASN, RN and specializes in CCU, Geriatrics, Critical Care, Tele.

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Health care: Hospitals fear loss of control finding nurses

The new immigration bill could prevent hospitals from having any control over recruiting specialized care nurses from other countries, according to some recruiters. The bill also would remove an existing screening requirement for the Commission on Graduates of Foreign Nursing Schools to evaluate all applicants.

Hospital recruiters-already struggling to fill nursing positions-fear Congress could make their jobs more difficult.

"The immigration proposal doesn't do anything to help us bring in registered nurses," says Catheryn Cotten, director of the international office of Duke University Medical Center and Health System, which currently has 73 foreign nurses working on temporary status.

She and other hospital representatives say the current system, which can experience long delays in getting applicants' visas, is at least controlled by employers. Under the proposed system, hospitals would no longer be able to seek out applicants with specific qualifications, such as a cardiac nurse.

Instead, foreign residents would apply to come to the USA, then, based on a point system, get in if they had enough points. The most points would be awarded for advanced degrees.

Others raise concern that the bill would remove a current requirement that nurse applicants are screened by the Commission on Graduates of Foreign Nursing Schools, an independent non-profit that evaluates their schooling and other credentials.

Full Story: http://www.usatoday.com/money/economy/2007-05-28-immigration-hospital-usat_N.htm

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37 Posts; 1,357 Profile Views

If ever the point system will be implemented, does it mean we must have years of hospital experience and at least have masteral degree in nursing to have greater advantage over the others?

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65 Posts; 1,648 Profile Views

As I read this with you yes, but this does not mention the loop hole of experience vrs. degree... which most hospitals value most.

Give me an ADN with 10 years over a BSN with 2 is my theory, Or a BSN with 10 over an MSN with 2 yrs.

You are aways more valuable with a higher degree but the experience at bedside is the tie breaker.

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PeachPie specializes in EC, IMU, LTAC.

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Can we please merge this thread with the already existing one with the same article?

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1,343 Posts; 5,653 Profile Views

Recruiting needs to be jeopardized. If employers here made working conditions tolerable and gave RN's the authority they need to run the hospitals for the benefit of patients, there'd be no nursing shortage.

It's all about the money, though, and keeping nurses downtrodden.

So until we collectively rear up and roar back...

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fluppypacky has 15 years experience and specializes in ICU.

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If this points system will be implemented,what will happen to those nurses who were already filed and approved? Will they be still included?If yes,does it mean we will start from zero. If US employers will not have the authority to recruite nurses,what will happen to all pending cases?

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The issue isn't the accesibility of foreign nurses. The issue is the inability of the nursing profession to recruit American citizens, already here, already paying taxes and ready to contribute to the American economy.

Oddly, in California, you'll be lucky to get in to nursing school after a 2 year wait. In other parts of the country, like the midwest, nurses are often paid so miserably and given 6 or more patients to boot that I've been told their nursing schools are virtually empty. Is this true?

It seems like bringing foreign nurses in greater numbers is not a very effective way of dealing with deeper issues problem.

Are foreign nurses paid less than Americans? Do foreign nurses advocate for better nursing conditions? Who is sponsoring their work visa? Could they pass the NCLEX as a screening measure? Do foreign nurses do a satisfactory job the majority of the time?

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PeachPie specializes in EC, IMU, LTAC.

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Foreign nurses are nothing but a band-aid for the nursing shortage. The underlying issues still exist, and a lot of them are subject to the grueling, dangerous conditions that the Americans fled form. I have a lot of Filipino nurse friends who say that they will tell their kids never to be nurses due to all the crap that they had to endure.

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caroladybelle is a BSN, RN and specializes in Oncology/Haemetology/HIV.

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Oddly, in California, you'll be lucky to get in to nursing school after a 2 year wait. In other parts of the country, like the midwest, nurses are often paid so miserably and given 6 or more patients to boot that I've been told their nursing schools are virtually empty. Is this true?

Are foreign nurses paid less than Americans? Do foreign nurses advocate for better nursing conditions? Who is sponsoring their work visa? Could they pass the NCLEX as a screening measure? Do foreign nurses do a satisfactory job the majority of the time?

Please review the (literally) hundreds of threads on this BB.

Despite poor pay rates, to my knowledge, there are no "virtually empty" nursing schools in the nation. The very few that do not have full houses and/or wait lists, generally charge excessively high tuition or have poor NCLEX pass rates, or poor reputations.

Six patients is not that bad a ratio. In many places, 6-10 on days are the norm. The CNA (if there is one) may have 15-20.

To my knowledge, at this time ALL IMMIGRANT NURSES must pass the NCLEX as well as either been educated in an English-speaking program, or pass extensive english testing so that they are reasonably fluent, though obviously regional dialect is not tested.

(At one time, Canadian nurses that passed the canadian form of the test were permitted to work in a few states, without taking the NCLEX. That since has changed)

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krazykev specializes in Neurosciences.

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Good! I am glad to hear that Immigration bill could jeopardize nurse recruiting! Maybe then the politicians will get off their butts and actually do something to help eliminate the backlog of people wanting to get into nursing schools across the nation. I spent two years trying to get into a nursing program and I have another college degree. And I cannot find a job in that particular field because of foreign competition.

So I really do not feel any empathy for the foreigners that want to come here for the nursing jobs. I say keep them out of here and let’s protect our jobs and wages.

Signed,

Another frustrated American citizen tired of watching his wages decrease due to foreign competition.:angryfire

P.S. I live in the Midwest and ALL of our nursing schools are full with a two plus year wait as well.:o

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90 Posts; 4,138 Profile Views

krazykev "Signed,

Another frustrated American citizen tired of watching his wages decrease due to foreign competition.angryfire.gif"

Could not have it put it better myself. The nursing profession is the last option for middle-class American Citizens to make a decent wage without years of schooling. Between NAFTA and outsourcing all the good jobs are gone, now people are worried about giving foreign citizens our jobs? Maybe we need to outsource some politician's jobs too.

And all the "biased articles" I see on this site (one on the front page now) complaining how the American health care system is ranked at the bottom of every category imaginable, makes me wonder why people would come from other countries to work in this awful, low ranking system.

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Are foreign nurses paid less than Americans? Do foreign nurses advocate for better nursing conditions? Who is sponsoring their work visa? Could they pass the NCLEX as a screening measure? Do foreign nurses do a satisfactory job the majority of the time?

Hi, I can only speak from my own personal experience as a foreign nurse.

I am not paid any less than my American co-workers and yes, I pride myself in advocating for better conditions for the benefit of all. I am an active and enthusiastic member of our hospital's Nurse Practice Council.

My employer petitioned for my visa and in return, I signed a binding contract to work there for a minimum of 2 years, although I will probably stay beyond the 2 years, I have no reason to look elsewhere.

All foreign nurses are required to pass NCLEX. I studied hard and was delighted to pass on my first attempt.

I believe I do a satisfactory job. I was a nurse in the UK for many years and believe I brought with me to the US a wealth of experience. I have been here just over a year and I know from my evaluations and feedback from Management that they feel they made a good investment in petitioning me.

I'm sorry you feel the way you do, but I also understand why you feel the way you do, CIR is making everyone nervous.

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