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I'm 56 want to be be a nurse, anyone else out there?

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by Byatt Byatt (New Member) New Member

656 Visitors; 5 Posts

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I have just graduated with a Health & Social Care Management degree, but realise, maybe too late, that nursing is my dream. It may just be a pipe dream. I have applied to UCAS today, but really would like to know if there are any others around my age, training...or planning to train.

:typing

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Thanet has 30+ years experience and works as a Staff nurse.

1 Article; 3,550 Visitors; 126 Posts

Have you read THIS THREAD?

It might help you with your inquiry.

Good luck.

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KatieBrookeRN works as a Nurse.

1,687 Visitors; 11 Posts

Hi Byatt-

I'm am from the US, Iowa, will be an RN in May of 2010 and I am 19.

I have made friends with a lady in my Nursing class that is 57. She is one of the most compassionate and caring people I know. She is very wise and will make the perfect Nurse. I have faith you can do it too =) I wish good luck to you!

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Fiona59 has 18 years experience.

17 Likes; 1 Follower; 52,307 Visitors; 8,242 Posts

https://allnurses.com/men-nursing-forum/nursing-career-over-310811.html

Also deals with students of "mature years".

I still believe that the mind may be willing but the body isn't always on board.

You're looking at a three year programme, right? That will make you roughly 60 when you are able to work. The UK is like Canada and the desirable jobs are based on seniority.

Look at it realistically, do you see a 60yo you working nights on a ward?

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XB9S has 22 years experience and works as a Registered nurse.

4 Likes; 1 Follower; 8 Articles; 63,146 Visitors; 2,968 Posts

Hi Bryatt, as Fiona has said the nursing degree is 3 years but you would need to get a place first and depending on where you apply you may have to wait a year or even 2 for a place.

When you qualify and start applying for jobs your prospective employers would have no information about you other than your qualifications this is to make sure there is fairness in the selction of workers so your age shouldn't play any part in it, having said that you will need to give a good deal of thought about how long you do want to work past 60 and if you feel that spending time studying for a few years work as a nurse would be worth it.

Only you will know the answer to this.

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Fiona59 has 18 years experience.

17 Likes; 1 Follower; 52,307 Visitors; 8,242 Posts

Sharrie:

I was pointing out the seniority issue because many posters think they walk out of nursing school and into the "dream" nursing job (clinics with human hours, public health (again the hours)). I know here that those jobs are governed by years of experience and unless you find one of those jobs in the worst run division (where no one wants to work due to "issues") they just don't go to new nurses.

A lot of the US posters think that they will be working until their 70s and 80s but I'd love to know where! I'm 50 and figure I've five years left on the wards.

It's one of the main reasons I've stayed andLPN and not gone for my registration. I'd have to work three years full time after my graduation just to repay the student loans (I'd be 57), my increase in pension just wouldn't be there for the time I have left. There is no way I'd still be full time on the ward at pushing 60.

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3 Likes; 57,219 Visitors; 10,263 Posts

You're too old. I did it at 52, when I was still a youngster.

;)

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656 Visitors; 5 Posts

Thank you all for your responses!

Fiona and Sharrie, I appreciate your bluntness. I have weighed up all the things you have said and agree...other than the fact that in the UK now, retirement age has gone up and I will have to work till 64, almost 65. But as you say, Sharrie, the mind may be willing but the body may let me down :( Plus of course, who is going to employ me. Having said that, my work options whilst not being the same as younger nurses, may give me opportunities I might not otherwise have. Nonetheless, age is an issue. I don't have to worry about student loans, we are offered a small bursary and tuition fees are paid, another reason though why I may not even be offered a place. With the recession and so many graduates out of work, places are competitive.

I sent off my application for 2010 entry just recently, but now seem to have a 'cold water thrown at me' realisation (not from you, but my own thoughts), that perhaps I am not being practical.

I am looking at other options and looking for work, and trying to remain positive. I didn't expect to be doing this at my age, but when my husband left me 5 years ago, and all the financial security I had worked for, plus looking after my autistic daughter (so worked when and where I could)...was lost. So instead of enjoying a reasonable retirement, I have to start again. I just thought if I did something I really wanted to do, it would be less painful.

But, time to accept my limitations, which centre on age, sadly.

Thanks again for taking the time to respond.

Denise :)

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madeleine works as a Dermatology Nurse.

2,656 Visitors; 42 Posts

Byatt - I don't necessarily think you are 'too old'. If you are fit and healthy you shouldn't have a problem. You are clearly capable of the academic side. It may be that you don't want full time work anyway and there are part-time nursing jobs. Not all jobs are physically strenuous either. If you find you don't like it then at least you will have tried and not have regrets about never trying. Really, despite what some younger people think 56 is not old. I'm 56 and probably fitter now than when in my 20's. On the course I did, most of the students were 'mature' and were much more commited and did better academically than the 'youngsters' straight from their 'A' levels. Think about it, when our parents were 56 (or even 40!) they seemed 'old'. Times are different now. Go for it and jolly good luck.

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1,510 Visitors; 39 Posts

Hi,

I am a nursing student and in my class there is a lady who is 59,and another lady who is 56,so forget about age,if you feel read to do it,just go ahead.

Unfortunately society is very ageist,but if you feel deep in your heart that nursing is your vocation,do not worry about people.

Good luck.

p.s.I am 39 and in my 2nd year.

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MeditationPeace works as a Retired.

3,954 Visitors; 46 Posts

Byatt - I say go for it. I've been a nurse for a long, long time but I've just graduated with a BSc in Midwifery...at 59 1/2 years old! Why not? I've got at least 5 good years of midwifery ahead of me, and loads of maturity, wisdom, life (and nursing) experience, and common sense to offer to women and families. It's very true that the 6th decade nowadays is nothing like it was for our parents!

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XB9S has 22 years experience and works as a Registered nurse.

4 Likes; 1 Follower; 8 Articles; 63,146 Visitors; 2,968 Posts

Wow that's amazing gail, well done your an inspiration.

I was actually going to post back here today, I've been speaking to my mum today who retired 10 years ago, she's 62 and is booked onto a return to nursing course. She's really looking forward to going back to nursing

If it's really what you want to do and you think you can mentally and physically cope with the challenge then go for it

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