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If your are pursing MSN/FNP/DNP what area do you work in?

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by PAERRN20 PAERRN20 (Member)

PAERRN20 has 3 years experience and specializes in ER.

6,978 Visitors; 660 Posts

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I am planning on starting a MSN program Fall 2010. My question is what type of floor do you work on? If you work outside the hospital, what type of agency do you work for?

Some background info: I currently work in a busy ED. I have some health issues that make it difficult to work the 12 hr shifts I've been doing. I am looking to move to a little more laid back area such as rehab or post-partum.

My question is do you think it will affect me in the long run if I leave the ED/critical care arena and head towards a more low key area? My goal is to eventually teach (CNA/LPN/ associate RN). Thanks for any and all advice!

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ghillbert has 20 years experience and specializes in CTICU.

1 Follower; 41,101 Visitors; 3,641 Posts

I've worked rehab and did NOT find it laid back - I found it physically and mentally draining.

On the other hand, I LOVE critical care. I thrive on the challenge and pace, and love learning new things. I work in the CTICU/cardiac transplant arena and I'm studying to be an ACNP.

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1,174 Visitors; 5 Posts

I will be pursuing my MSN-NP in Psych/Mental health and Adult. :)

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valkyria has 4 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in ICU, Telemetry, neuro,research.

3,911 Visitors; 151 Posts

I too work in trauma now but I have other focuses in my life now and I want to slow down. I have a MS in education and I am going for my ARNP in critical care. So much for slowing down. But, this way I can have both. I can teach and I can work with my patients but I do not have to be in the unit running codes. The problem is, money. What they pay professors compared to what you can make at the bedside or working with a physician, that will make it more difficult. Perhaps this will cause folks to look for homes elsewhere. For instance, I used to live in Georgia, outside of Atlanta. I have been looking at going back there. More home for less money, less taxes, lower cost of living and still all the advantages of a large metropolitan city. Food for thought.

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PAERRN20 has 3 years experience and specializes in ER.

6,978 Visitors; 660 Posts

Thanks for the reply. I am looking to get into education. I have a well paying job but the stress isn't worth it anymore. I am concerned that if I go to rehab or outpatient surgery that schools will have an issue with this since there is absolutely no critical care. I know the ED isn't technically critical care, but I do vents, ICU admits, transfers, etc. and I do take care of many critical patients.

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valkyria has 4 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in ICU, Telemetry, neuro,research.

3,911 Visitors; 151 Posts

Trust me I know that our ED is beyond critical care. If anything I would worry that you would become bored but if you get bitten by the teaching bug and you fall in love with it as you did with adrenaline, you will be an asset to any school and a blessing to any student. There is alot to be said for gratification from your career but there are many kinds of gratification. There is alot to be said for watching someone perform under pressure who you taught. There is no feeling like that.:redbeathe

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mom2cka specializes in FNP.

9,400 Visitors; 329 Posts

I'm starting an FNP program this fall, and currently work FT in an acute rehab unit - rather busy, average 7-8 patients with an LPN, often we share a PCA for 13 patients. We're responsible for bathing, toileting, ADLs, teaching, assessments, treatments, meds, etc. While we work as a team, if the PCA did all of the patient care-type stuff, lights would never go off and things just wouldn't get done. It's physical - but I started there 2 years ago as a new grad, and don't know how it would compare to the ER - when I float to other units, though, it's often a very nice 'break' from my unit. Good luck with your decision and schooling!

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Christen, ANP has 6 years experience and specializes in Critical Care, Orthopedics, Hospitalists.

4,568 Visitors; 290 Posts

I started out in critical care, worked there for four years, and am now in a leadership position in orthpedics pursing my ANP. I am very grateful for my critical care experience as it taught me so much and really helped me development my confidence and decision-making skills. The leadership role has been very helpful in teaching me how to lead a team.

I think working in these areas really helped me be able to pursue my ANP so quickly because I was exposed to a lot of different types of patients very quickly!

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