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If I hear this/see this one more time, I'm gonna scream!

Nurses   (7,539 Views | 49 Replies)

dudette10 has 9 years experience as a MSN, RN and specializes in Med/Surg, Academics.

1 Article; 26,324 Profile Views; 3,530 Posts

An RT was in my patient's room. I heard the DD ask the RT for her mom to be moved up in bed. It was right next to the nurse's station where I was standing, so I started to go in there to help the RT with the boost. I walked into the room, past the RT, and went to the bed. I turned around, expecting the RT to be standing there waiting for me to get into position. He was walking out the door. I had to walk back out and get another nurse to help.

I was in the middle of doing paperwork when the monitor tech called to say that some of the leads were off on a patient. I asked the only PCT in sight--who was leaning against the station doing nothing to go in there to adjust it. "That's not my patient" was the answer. "Yes, I know, but the leads need checking. Please do it." Huff-n-Puff.

Do you ever feel as if you work with a bunch of children on some days who can't look past their own narrow world? I don't think I'll ever get used to this attitude. Ever.

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TriciaJ has 39 years experience as a RN and specializes in Psych, Corrections, Med-Surg, Ambulatory.

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I don't think those behaviours are all that new. I think it's a function of poor leadership on the part of managers/admin that people think they should get away with poor work standards.

If expectations were communicated and enforced; if you were given the backing and support you need you wouldn't be working with someone's poorly-raised children. It seems to be a never-ending problem.

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dudette10 has 9 years experience as a MSN, RN and specializes in Med/Surg, Academics.

1 Article; 3,530 Posts; 26,324 Profile Views

I don't think those behaviours are all that new. I think it's a function of poor leadership on the part of managers/admin that people think they should get away with poor work standards.

You know, I jumped to poor work ethic initially. But, I think there's something more going on. A very narrow field of vision when it comes to roles and assignments. The RT probably felt that boosting was a nurse's or PCT's job, and he didn't once stop to think that caring for a patient was his job. The PCT was thinking "assignment" rather than patient care.

Nurses seem to be a bit different. Maybe it's because we do everything anyway. I could never imagine a nurse not responding to a code call just because it wasn't her patient. Every nurse who isn't otherwise preoccupied with patient care that can't safely be interrupted jumps up when a code is called, and if there is no role for her to fill at the code, she returns to her previous work. The station completely clears out when that big bang sounds like a patient has fallen. I've seen more than one nurse working on an admit who was a mess.

ETA: You're right about the leadership thing. Unfortunately, the only thing I ever hear about is when we're told that another role has complained that we haven't helped them. Ugh.

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4 Posts; 507 Profile Views

Amen to that! I once asked a PT to help me get a pt up that he had just finished with that had to go so urgently he kept saying he wasn't going to make it. The PT wouldn't help me at all! I didn't have time to get other help, and by the time I could help him stand up safely, he had lost bladder control. I was FURIOUS. I'm a nursing student though, so I really didn't have anyone to complain to except for my clinical instructor. The charge nurse didn't have much to say about it either.

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4 Posts; 507 Profile Views

Amen to that! I once asked a PT to help me get a pt up that he had just finished with that had to go so urgently he kept saying he wasn't going to make it. The PT wouldn't help me at all! I didn't have time to get other help, and by the time I could help him stand up safely, he had lost bladder control. I was FURIOUS. I'm a nursing student though, so I really didn't have anyone to complain to except for my clinical instructor. The charge nurse didn't have much to say about it either.

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359 Posts; 5,738 Profile Views

HUGE problem @ my work ~ the other CNA's CONSTANTLY walk right past lights if it isn't "their" resident. Drives me insane.

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DixieRedHead has 20 years experience as a ASN, RN and specializes in ED/ICU/TELEMETRY/LTC.

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I have a strict rule. Nobody, not me or anyone else walks past a light that is flashing.

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2,228 Posts; 20,200 Profile Views

I have to agree with the RT, that boosting a patient up in bed is a nursing function not a respiratory function. I wouldn't expect a lab tech that was drawing blood to help boost a patient up in bed either.

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Ruby Vee has 40 years experience as a BSN and specializes in CCU, SICU, CVSICU, Precepting & Teaching.

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an rt was in my patient's room. i heard the dd ask the rt for her mom to be moved up in bed. it was right next to the nurse's station where i was standing, so i started to go in there to help the rt with the boost. i walked into the room, past the rt, and went to the bed. i turned around, expecting the rt to be standing there waiting for me to get into position. he was walking out the door. i had to walk back out and get another nurse to help.

i was in the middle of doing paperwork when the monitor tech called to say that some of the leads were off on a patient. i asked the only pct in sight--who was leaning against the station doing nothing to go in there to adjust it. "that's not my patient" was the answer. "yes, i know, but the leads need checking. please do it." huff-n-puff.

do you ever feel as if you work with a bunch of children on some days who can't look past their own narrow world? i don't think i'll ever get used to this attitude. ever.

an rt whose patient is desaturating because they're slumped down in bed will help you boost that patient. they'll even volunteer to help you boost that patient. i think your mistake was in not saying to the rt, cheerful as can be, as you walked past him "i'd be happy to help you boost your patient." he would have looked like a real jerk walking away then! patient care is everybody's job. interesting, though, how it's more the nurse's job than anybody else's!

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57 Posts; 1,695 Profile Views

I am an RT student. One of the prerequisites we have to take is a nurse aide course. I would totally have helped with that patient. When I am on the floor, if the nurses need something as simple as that, I'd be happy to. Just wanted to assure you that the RT's behavior was wrong.

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dudette10 has 9 years experience as a MSN, RN and specializes in Med/Surg, Academics.

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I have to agree with the RT, that boosting a patient up in bed is a nursing function not a respiratory function. I wouldn't expect a lab tech that was drawing blood to help boost a patient up in bed either.

Considering that boosting gets the patient in an optimal position for maximum lung expansion, I would have to disagree.

A PP mentioned PT refusing to help toilet a patient. PTs teach safe transfers, so I see no reason why a PT couldn't participate in that "nursing function" for the broader need of patient care.

As for a phleb, they might not know how to do it safely. If I was in a bind, I might ask though, while providing thorough direction.

At any rate, you've helped prove my point about a narrow focus on function/role/assignment, rather than a broader focus on patient care.

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MassED has 15 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in ER.

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it's a general culture now of poor teamwork and a lack of maturity and pride in your work. When one pride's themselves on their work ethic, they help all who need it. Period.

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