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If you apply and accept a job, don't bail out for no good reason

Nurses   (3,527 Views 33 Comments)
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I'm of the opinion that, we should do our due diligence before we accept a job. We need to find out specifics such as ratios, hours, etc. Then we make the commitment to work there. Unless you've been lied to, I think you should stay for more than 6 weeks.

It's a common theme here, often a new grad who settles for the job they can get, who then wants to jump ship right away! I've seen different versions of this many times. I've heard various rationale, I hate nightshift , I'm not challenged on med-surg, I have too many patients in LTC, my coworkers are rude bullies, etc.

There are some extreme situations of course, but generally speaking I think it's unprofessional to bail out of a job so soon.

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I'm of the opinion that, we should do our due diligence before we accept a job. We need to find out specifics such as ratios, hours, etc. Then we make the commitment to work there. Unless you've been lied to, I think you should stay for more than 6 weeks.

It's a common theme here, often a new grad who settles for the job they can get, who then wants to jump ship right away! I've seen different versions of this many times. I've heard various rationale, I hate nightshift , I'm not challenged on med-surg, I have too many patients in LTC, my coworkers are rude bullies, etc.

There are some extreme situations of course, but generally speaking I think it's unprofessional to bail out of a job so soon.

I have to agree with you on that.

A new grad who is not challenged on Med/Surg or LTC probably is not trying very hard. If you're making an effort to understand the pathophysiology of every patient in your care, know their lab values and what that means to that particular patient, know the standard dose of every medication you give including the reason the patient is getting that medication, what side and toxic effects to watch out for, drug interactions, etc. you'll find it plenty challenging.

I've seen too many posts where the poster is convinced that "a cloud of mean bullies is following me everywhere I go" or that ALL of her coworkers hate her. If you meet one new coworker and he's a jerk, you've met a jerk. But if every coworker you meet is a jerk, then the jerk is you.

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I'm of the opinion that, we should do our due diligence before we accept a job. We need to find out specifics such as ratios, hours, etc. Then we make the commitment to work there. Unless you've been lied to, I think you should stay for more than 6 weeks.

It's a common theme here, often a new grad who settles for the job they can get, who then wants to jump ship right away! I've seen different versions of this many times. I've heard various rationale, I hate nightshift , I'm not challenged on med-surg, I have too many patients in LTC, my coworkers are rude bullies, etc.

There are some extreme situations of course, but generally speaking I think it's unprofessional to bail out of a job so soon.

I disagree. Employers don't hesitate to drop employees who no longer meet their needs ...and they don't hire people because they "care" about them on a personal or professional level. Employees shouldn't feel obligated to offer anything that employers don't offer. Nothing in exchange for nothing seems pretty fair to me.

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Employment at will. The employer or the employee can terminate employment at any time, for any reason, or no reason at all.

I truly believe that a person's loyalty/responsibility should be to themselves and their families FIRST. I also really don't want an employee who is not fully engaged in their job. I would rather they leave and make room for someone who is.

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I've been lucky, in that I've worked in good conditions.

But I've seen some situations that haven't worked out for former classmates, or former coworkers, and even posters here on AN, and I'm not about to judge someone who's clearly miserable (for whatever reason).

Whether it's night shift (and boy am I lucky, I've never had to do it), or distance, or the job wasn't what one envisioned ... I'd rather work with someone who is satisfied with their work environment. Or, their work/life balance.

And, like Sour Lemon said, employers don't hesitate to drop an employee that doesn't meet their needs so ...

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I think it's funny your title says "for no good reason" and then you go on to list a few good reasons that they quit. Bullying, high patient ratios, not challenging, not wanting to work night shift. The main one being THEY SETTLED for that job. If at any time during their short employment someone had made them feel useful, wanted, respected, or any other positive word you want to throw in, they might stay. If someone settles for a job, but it turns out to be a decent place they'll usually stay. If some place treats you like another bag of raw nurse meat then I say get whatever better comes along.

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Not being challenged enough after 6 weeks, is not a good reason. That is the fault of the new grad...just as Ruby Vee said.

You haven't even had time enough to get settled in, and familiar with the basics, let alone the in depth challenges that are there you haven't even discovered yet.

Bullies? Not nearly as common as complained of, but if it is, what makes you think the next place will be any better?

Working nights? hard to avoid, there are very few set schedules in the hospital world.

Now, I totally agree to putting your health and family first, but 6 weeks is not enough to make that judgement. Part of taking care of your family is earning the money to do it with.

The original complaint is about not paying attention to what you've applied for and agreed with! Huge waste of everyone's time and money, for you to turn around and leave. Yes employers can let you go on a whim, it is up to you to make them WANT to keep you.

I had several months out when my husband was dying, lost 7 months during my own cancer, went back on light duty before the chemo was done. My bosses did everything they could to help me out and ease me back in.

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Employees shouldn't feel obligated to offer anything that employers don't offer.

I completely agree. Loyalty is a two-way street.

Also, from the employer's return-on-investment perspective, I actually think it's better to resign a position that the employee feels certain is a poor match for them after six weeks rather than six months. That way the amount of time and money the employer invests into the employee is minimal, and the employer can hopefully find another employee who is a "better fit".

The only caveat I'd like to add is that for new/recent grads, make sure you're actually resigning the position because the job has real, tangible shortcomings. Because frankly, being a new nurse is often extremely tough and many times even a good position can feel overwhelming until you've gained some real nursing experience and confidence.

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I think the majority of new grads do stick with their jobs. However those who are uncertain if the should switch are far more likely to post here than those who stay put. Life is too short to be in a workplace you are truely unhappy or feel unsafe. My cadveat would be to have another position lines up before switching

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I used to think like that, too. I drove an hour and a half one way to my first nursing job for 15 months before I finally had to change to a hospital closer to home. I was literally falling asleep driving home on the busiest highway in my state. Now I've been at my current job for 3 years. I come in extra all the time to prevent mandatory overtime. I switch shifts to cover holes. I float out of turn. I come in extra on other units if mine is staffed well to prevent other units from having mandatory overtime. I'm a precepting MACHINE, I pump out nurses like clockwork. I'm charge all the damn time.

My hospital could not care less. A resident accused me of patient negligence a few months ago. Long story short she was covering her own butt because she had actually put orders in way wrong. Admin did not hesitate to jump down my throat and point fingers at me. Even the union wasn't helpful. What saved me was my own detailed charting, and a fully oriented patient who about had a stroke when they told her what I was being accused of.

I don't owe them anything. I give them my time and in turn they give me a paycheck. Life is short; there's no reason to stay at a job you don't want, even if there isn't anything wrong with that job.

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I've baled from one job on day five of orientation. It wasn't the job they had promised at the interview. It didn't meet my goals for my future (other than it had free parking!)

They only paid me for five days, I could have stayed until the end of a three week orientation and told them, it wasn't a good fit, but hey, I knew it wasn't for me.

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But is their license in danger??? Lol. That seems to be a theme around here lately as a reason for quitting.

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