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I Pad Note taking

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by TmC1999 TmC1999 (Member)

TmC1999 has 4 years experience and works as a RN.

2,135 Visitors; 40 Posts

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Has anyone purchased the I Pad and using it effectively for note taking?? I'm looking into getting it and was unsure if it was worth it to spend the money. My biggest wonder would be if there is an app out there that would allow you to write on the i pad with a stylus and it turns into to type. but my handwriting is horrid and this would be easier to read!

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1,359 Visitors; 31 Posts

I have an iPad and have been using it in the classroom. I did not purchase it with the intention of using it for school but, it has proven to be quite useful. I know that there are apps that let you take notes with a stylus (i just don't know what they are). I bought a flexible bluetooth keyboard so I can type my notes. I have no problem with the virtual keyboard, but because I turn my volume all the way down and i can't hear the clicks I end of typing crazy sometimes lol. It worked out really well and it lets me type a little faster. I use an App called Evernote to take all my notes and keep everything organized. It syncs to a cloud so i have all my notes on my iPad, iMac, iPod touch and online plus it's free. Go to evernote.com for more info (it has a ton more features). Do you have a desktop or a laptop? I LOVE LOVE LOVE my iPad, but if i didn't already have my iMac I would not have bought it to use as my main computer.

 

The Good:

1. Lightweight/portable- I can take it everywhere. It's not cumbersome and its just so easy to throw it in my bag or purse.

2. Battery life- It really does last me all day (10 hours no joke) I don't have to worry about carrying extra power cords in case it dies like most laptops and netbooks. I charge it at night before bed and I'm set for the next day.

3. Quit- I know this sounds like a weird pro, but the ipad does not make any noise so you really don't disrupt your fellow classmates

4. Less intrusive- another weird one. laptops and netbooks set this barrier between you and the instructor. Because the iPad is flat it opens up the space. (ok i know this one sounds crazy, but I feel more connected to the material/lecture this way, plus i feel like my teachers know that I'm paying attention and not on facebook or something)

5. More- there are a ton of other great features including using ebooks and having fun, but for note taking purposes these are the best

 

Things to think about:

1. make sure you can use it in class- Always make sure you have permission (this includes laptops) some teachers don't allow computers. I always ask if they allow laptops, then ask if i can use my iPad. Some people just think of it as a 'toy' and can't picture it as being productive.

2. Limitations- If you plan on using this as your primary computer I would go with a Macbook pro (I'm a huge Mac fan in case you couldn't tell lol) or some other laptop or desktop.

 

Overall, I have been using it since class started and I love it.

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690 Visitors; 7 Posts

I was thinking of getting one as well.....thanks for the info.

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3,587 Visitors; 209 Posts

i wish I had an ipad I would def buy it to take notes, but i dont have that type of cash; maybe i will buy one before my lpn school or somthing to take good notes on.

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janets1 works as a student.

884 Visitors; 11 Posts

Before I started nursing school, I read the boards about the pros and cons of an iPad in school. I love technology, so I purchased one even though they were regarded as an extra or a toy.

I love love love my iPad. I have no need for a laptop in school. I come to class with my iPad and a pen, in case I have to complete some handout in class. Everyone else is dragging backpacks that weigh 30+ pounds.

I use noterize as my note taker $2.99. (It reads both pdf and powerpoint files.) My instructors make their powerpoint presentations available to students. So I open the presentation and tap the microphone. The entire lecture is recorded and synced to each slide. For review, if I have a question about a specific slide, I tap the microphone icon and listen to the recorded sound byte that relates specifically to that slide. No fast forwarding or rewinding trying to find the right spot. Noterize also allows typing notes on each slide, highlighting on the slide, and using your fingertip to write on each slide. I use the type, as the handwriting (whether fingertip or stylus) makes my writing large and kindergarten like. If you prefer you may add blank pages in the middle of existing presentations, or create files adding blank pages as you need them. It's very flexible and stable. It does crash on rare occasions, but restarting the app is generally all that is required.

I have a ton of apps. Most free, some cheap, and 1 expensive (Davis drug book. $49.00)

I use the web browser (safari) all the time. Sometimes its to look something up during lecture. More often its to research something quickly during clinical prep.

I would be happy to share my list of apps if you are interested. (Most work on iPhone and/or iPod touches as well)

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787 Visitors; 3 Posts

Dear janets1,

Please, please do share your list of apps that you've found helpful! I am going to ask for one for Christmas! :)

I have an Iphone and love it.

The only thing I've been worried about is this: when I tried an ipad out in the store using the keyboard to type, It felt awkward to "hover" and it was sensitive - letters I guess I was barely touching would come out. I'm a fast "traditional" typer - still use my IBM style keyboard with number pad. I saw the other person's post about using a "a flexible bluetooth keyboard" , would this be the best way to solve that problem?

Anyone else - feel free to comment...

Thanks!

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1,072 Visitors; 15 Posts

I would be happy to share my list of apps if you are interested. (Most work on iPhone and/or iPod touches as well)

I'd love your list - I think you have me convinced that an ipad is the way to go.

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4,818 Visitors; 216 Posts

I didnt have plans to get an ipad but rather an ipod touch. However

I bought a car yesterday and they gave me an ipad for free. So instead of my mom buying me a touch she is just going to buy ipad stuff - case, keyboardand itunes giftcards. Reading this post has got me excited about starting ns in a few weeks with an ipad. :)

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janets1 works as a student.

884 Visitors; 11 Posts

Some of my apps are "must haves" others are conveniences. So that's how I will list them.

Must haves:

Epocrates. This free app is probably the most beneficial app I own. I use it all the time. There is a subscription portion to it, (available for free 10 day preview) I did the preview, and found that the extras were not worth the money to me now. Things may change next year, but for now everything free is phenomenal enough for me. I particularly love that

1. it updates frequently,

2. it has images of all the different pills a medication can come in. Perfect for bedside when the client says "That doesn't look like my pill!" No running to verify, find a PDR with images, generally interupting your flow and damaging your calm. :-) Together you look at the screen to verify that the pill you are giving is in fact made by a different manufacturer but is an equivalent.

3. I love the interaction checker. I add all of the meds a client has prescribed and in 2 seconds I have a list of possible interactions. I use this function frequently with care plans.

4. Interested in research but don't read journals in your bubble bath? Epocrates will send you brief reviews ONLY on the topics of interest you indicate an interest in. Working an OB/Peds rotation, choose only research in those areas.

Davis's Drug Guide from Unbound Medicine NOT from Medical Wizards. Price is the same, but there is a HUGE difference. Both update daily, and last for a year. However, at the end of one year, the Medical Wizards application will no longer launch. ($49.95 down the toilet) The Unbound Medicine version continues to launch, just not update. I have no problem with that, because my lovely print version of "Davis Drug Guide" has not updated one time since it was printed, and no one even thinks twice about it being obsolete. I also prefer the layout of the information more in the Unbound Medicine, it's visually appealing, with easy to navigate menus. The Medical Wizards version reminded me of a very very long small typed web page all jammed together. The info is exactly the same, I just prefer the presentation of Unbound Medicine's more. Finally The unbound medicine version has a favorites list. So during clinical prep I clear my previous favorites (20 seconds to do) and add each of the medications taken by my clients. My clinical supervisor allows us to use our drug books when she drills us about each of the medications we are giving. However, she gets inpatient if we dawdle and don't know most of it off the top of our head. This application is why she never so much as once gave me "the look" during drills.

I use "Medical Calc" for lots of quick little formulas. For example "Apgar score" it will list the 5 categories with the possible responses for each and the points earned by the response. At the bottom it calculates the score and lists the significance of the score. "generally normal, fairly low, etc." Every clinical we use the Glasgow, so eventually we memorize it, but sometimes we have to use a scale or formula we are not familiar with, the app has you covered.

gUnit this is a quick easy unit converter. Yes I can do it long hand, and some conversions in my head, but while I love math and generally do very well at it, I am not ALWAYS 100% at it. Occasionally I make a stupid mistake. Personally I don't want the safety of my client relying on my imperfect brain if a 100% accurate alternative exists. That's just my opinion, I could be wrong. :-)

As I said in an earlier post, I would be lost without Noterize for note taking. I use "Pages" on occasion when I have to open a Word document.

We have a growing Hispanic community so I use Emergency Medical Spanish Guide. I speak Spanish, so it's useful for me, I can read and repeat what it says. However if you don't speak spanish there is a free version that says the questions for you. All questions are yes or no responses, so you can work with the client while you wait on a translator, or as is the case in our area: figure out a way to communicate because we have very very few translators and they are assigned to something far more demanding and important than a nursing student.

Medscape is a WebMD app, that is full of information. I expected it to be watered down for the general public much like the website, but was really surprised and pleased with the results. I use it sometimes to get great background information on different disease processes, it also has a good drug guide, with interaction checker, and a Procedures & protocols (which is one of my favorites)

Convenience Apps

Flashlight - Silly app that just shines white light like a flashlight, I use it when walking to the car at night from the library. That's all it does nothing more.

BinauralBeat - I use this when studying sometimes. Particularly when I'm tired, or brain fried. Don't know how or why it works (perhaps just placebo effect) but I find it effective enough to use frequently. (Yes, I understand the theory behind it but haven't read enough journal articles to know if it is as effective as claimed.) You MUST use headphones for it to work.

Eye Chart Pro - creates a Snellen Chart to be used on an iPad 8 ft from Patient. It will create a new chart every time you touch the randomize button. Will also create an "E chart" with the touch of a button. There is a full version available, but the free version is more than enough for me. I use it infrequently, but am grateful to have it when needed.

ABX Guide - a Johns Hopkins product it's a list of vaccines available with vaccine type, indications, dosing, and adverse drug reactions. Got it for peds, kept it because 1st week in med/surg rotation worked with a client who had severe rare reactions to a Japanese encephalitis vaccine. Just a fluke I know, but I'm keeping it.

MedicalRadio - if you have an mp3 adapter in your car this app lets you listen to ReachMD. ReachMD is a station available with a Sirius or XM satellite radio subscription. This application does not require satellite radio or a paid subscription. I enjoy listening to it sometimes it's on topic for what we are studying, most times not. But I appreciate the easy exposure to medical information.

I have but rarely use

DxSaurus - the idea was great, click on symtpoms and get a list of medical diagnosis, but I don't find it particularly helpful, because 1 I don't diagnose, :-) and 2, after the first primary symptom is entered you have to trudge through a long list of possibilities, you can't add additional symptoms. (Of course you get what you pay for and free is sometimes costly.)

Icons on my desktop

I have bookmarks to the following websites on my desktop so the launch like an app, but take me right to the website I need. Of course you need either 3G, or access to Wifi for these to work. So far everywhere I have rotation has allowed me access to Wifi. I have the 3G as well so I'm ok either way.

Pediatric Merck Manual: Pediatrics: Merck Manual Professional

Home Merck Manual:

THE MERCK MANUAL MEDICAL LIBRARY: The Merck Manual of Medical Information--Home Edition

Definitive guide to every lab test known to man

Lab Tests Online: Welcome!

Includes definitions for ICD10-11 codes used. (We have to define all diagnosis for each client)

ICD9Data.com - Free 2011 ICD-9-CM Medical Diagnosis Codes Lookup and Search

Nice dosage calculator doesn't cover everything, but it's useful

Dosage Calculator - RX Desktop

Hopefully that will get you started. Download the must haves, look at the websites, play around with them now because in the trenches is not the time to learn the software. Don't overwhelm yourself with loads of new stuff or no matter how wonderful it is, you wont use it. Enjoy your Christmas break and your new iPads,

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Southern Magnolia works as a Mom.

7,082 Visitors; 446 Posts

I know this is an old thread but for those using iPad in clinicals . . . Where do you put it? How do you carry it? I know this sounds silly but I'm just wondering about the logistics. I just got an iPad and love it. I am pre raring for NS and just used a note taking ap to prep for my entrance exam. I use notes plus with a stylus and am convinced it will be perfect for note taking in classes. I hardly get on my laptop anymore. I'm just wondering about using it for clinical. I know with all the aps it would be useful just not sure about the logistics.

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690 Visitors; 7 Posts

I was gonna buy one this week, but they are coming out with an Ipad 2 in a few weeks, so I will wait.... Thanks for all the advice. I think it will come in handy as I start my clinicals in my FNP program

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Robublind has 1 years experience and works as a RN.

3,819 Visitors; 142 Posts

I know this is an old thread but for those using iPad in clinicals . . . Where do you put it? How do you carry it? I know this sounds silly but I'm just wondering about the logistics. I just got an iPad and love it. I am pre raring for NS and just used a note taking ap to prep for my entrance exam. I use notes plus with a stylus and am convinced it will be perfect for note taking in classes. I hardly get on my laptop anymore. I'm just wondering about using it for clinical. I know with all the aps it would be useful just not sure about the logistics.

One of our clinical instructor was using one but I would not bring one to clinical. I use my iphone for the drug guide etc but I clean that thing all the time in clinical. An Ipad seems to me to be a walking infection control problem. Second, its not like you can drop it in your pocket and suit up to go into an isolation room. I would be too afraid someone would walk off with it if I left it at the nursing station. I think for clinical you want either an Iphone or Itouch. If you need to write a note or do paperwork, get a nice metal clipboard. http://www.amazon.com/OfficemateOIC-Aluminum-Storage-Clipboard-83200/dp/B000Q62CKE/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1298697878&sr=8-2 I

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