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I Made It

Nurses Article   (17,904 Views 24 Replies 1,156 Words)
by tatara tatara (Member) Member

tatara specializes in psychiatric nursing, med/surg adult care.

1 Article; 4,281 Profile Views; 102 Posts

When did you know it was time to pursue nursing?

One of my earliest memories as a child was my mother telling me that I was prettier than my sister because I had the sweetest of smiles. I believed I was really very charming and I could say that my personality was oozing with confidence back then because I was the only one in my kindergarten class with a white and intact set of milk teeth. As years went by, I slowly became the timid, introvert pupil in our school.

I Made It

I got so self-conscious while growing up because my perfect smile was replaced by large, corn kernel-looking discolored teeth! Ah, I thought, I had to do something to reverse whatever curse was cast upon my teeth. I dreamed of becoming a dentist.

After many years, still holding on to my dream of earning a degree in dentistry, I motivated myself to survive high school so I can go to the city for college. Little did I know at that time, that my plan was very different from the one that I was made to fulfill.

That summer after high school graduation, when my 80-year old grandma arrived from abroad (where she lived for over 15 years with my aunt), was the turning point. She was frail and obviously need a great deal of nursing care. She had a number of diseases along with different complications like hypertension, dysarthria (related to a previous stroke), and obstructive sleep apnea. My mom, being the youngest among her siblings, was tasked to care for her. I saw how challenging her responsibilities were and I admired how graceful and systematic she performed each and every bed bath and diaper change knowing that she didn't even have any caregiving training at all! All was purely done as to how she has done it to us when we were little. With my gestures of trying to offer help, mom would say, "grandma needs you to hold her on the other side of the bed so she won't fall, and you are to share her happy memories of how you've been while she's away" thus, was my role: to keep grandma safe, happy, and alert. Never did I notice that as I admire my mom do her morning routines with grandma, I was being inspired to be like her when it will be my turn to take care of her in the future. Suddenly, I seemed to have forgotten how yellow my teeth are and how such a flaw made me feel about myself; I seemed to no longer care if my sister is prettier; nor even if I could still I dream of flashing a perfect white smile to the cutest guy in a campus. I just knew right then that no matter how I look, I got to be the best nurse my mom, grandma, and my family would ever have in their whole lives. (I even have had a silly thought that if I'm going to wear a white nurse's uniform, perhaps my face would glow under the light, and so my teeth would be whiter in the mirror). Come 1997, with the help of my supportive parents and very proud grandma, I took the road less taken (during the time when employment rate in the Philippines among qualified nurses was at the abyss).

How could I be in this course? Why did I enjoy attending the nursing101 class of miss t (for terrorist)? Perhaps, I thought, I was really born to become a nurse, it was just because I got so overwhelmed with frustrations about my imperfections and that I was so selfish not to notice life's clues. After deciding that I wanted to pursue nursing, I realized I was on the right path. My determination to love and finish nursing education peaked when I got to experience my first normal spontaneous delivery assist. I knew as soon as I hand-over that newborn to his teary-eyed father by the door that this is my calling.

As I pursued nursing, I discovered that all the learning in fundamentals would only have meaning as they are applied in practice. As I became a registered nurse, I discovered that those learning are meaningless if the heart is empty and if it is only the brain that dictates what I should do. As I became a staff nurse in an adult care section of a tertiary hospital, I discovered that every learning experience is a speck of sand that gets into an oyster that will soon become a lustrous sphere of pearl. Every encounter with different clients and their families are grains of sand, and will just remain as such if I won't be able to pick something good and worthwhile out of every encounter while doing what is expected of me.

Now, as I struggle through post-graduate study, I discovered that the great personalities behind the profession of nursing still speak of what they taught to our foremothers long before I become a nurse. They are not meant to be silenced under piles of nursing textbooks in college. As I use the nursing process, as I preserve the dignity of my profession, as I accept my limitations as a nurse while honoring the expertise of other allied health professionals, as I respect the dignity of my patients, as the thirst for education lingers in me, and as nursing becomes part of who I am, I believe I am doing my best to live by the teachings of these great theorists to whom I owe my pride as a nurse from. And even should mold and termites consume all the pages of their works in those books, their legacy lives on in each and every nurse who considers nursing as a selfless giving of oneself, a vocation.

Grandma died a year before I finished college, but I was able to apply what I learned from school and be of significant help to my mother especially in taking turns during weekends when grandma was slowly slipping from life to death. She died peacefully and without decubitus ulcers.

While I was preparing for hospital duty, already in my white clinical uniform, mom looked on in the mirror and said to me that she was no longer afraid to grow old and get weak because she has a daughter who will later be in-charge for her and dad. I got even more inspired to go on.

And as for my teeth, well, they remained discolored but I was able to take care of them that for over 20 years, I still have a complete set of teeth. I do not mind grinning with these yellow teeth for if I should have been a dentist, I wouldn't have realized how wonderful it is to become a nurse and I wouldn't be this privileged of touching and making a difference in the lives of my clients. Besides, in no time I can afford to have my teeth bleached (with state-of-the-art technology), it will just really take some time. I know my worth as a person, as a nurse, isn't in my smile but in the smiles of my ailing patients who are pleased that I have become a blessing for them.

This has been my personal journey and how I made it through.

This is my calling.

1 Article; 4,281 Profile Views; 102 Posts

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9 Posts; 1,202 Profile Views

Inspirational :) Thanks for posting this!

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cys02195 specializes in Med/Surg-ER.

2 Posts; 800 Profile Views

This article of your life and family are perfect and brings back memories of my struggles in nursing school. It is very rewarding when you finally accomplish something that you have worked so hard for. Congratulations on your success and sorry about your grandmother. I also lost my mom in May 2009. She too was not present when I received my RN degree but I know she would have been very proud.

Thank you for your story. :nurse:

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2 Posts; 735 Profile Views

Thank you for your great story and congratulations on your accomplishment.

I used to be a RN in Japan for 4 years and graduated University in the U.S. as BSN this January.

I still have language barrier, however, heart is borderless that what I am believing in.

The importance is personality.

Your story really inspires me!

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1 Article; 17 Posts; 2,216 Profile Views

What a wonderful story, I really like the way you wrote it couldn't stop reading. Good job and good luck with your career.

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18 Posts; 1,134 Profile Views

Damn....this is such a beautiful story.....lvn student here. This is so motivating

A.

San Jose CA

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13 Posts; 1,262 Profile Views

As a woman who is going back to college to take on nursing as a second degree, I thank you deeply for your story. Reading about your plight has just reaffirmed to me that I am not crazy in going back to school to become an RN, for I know it is my calling as well. Thank you.

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allie1230 specializes in SN - Graduating December, 2012.

14 Posts; 1,439 Profile Views

What an inspirational, well written, and beautifully articulated piece. Thank you for sharing your story and inspiring me!

Alisha

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4 Posts; 705 Profile Views

Thank you for sharing a part of your life with us. I was 5 weeks into LPN clinicals and I dropped. I was enjoying it, and doing pretty well. But stress overcame me and I wasn't sleeping and I became exhausted most of the time and was not able to preform clinical skills properly. I believe this is a calling for me also, since all I can think of is going back, but it would now take too much to get caught up, so I think I will let it go for now,and wait till my name surfaces again in a yr. Would you or someone have any advice for me.. I really didnt want to quit, but exhaustion and stress got the best of me.

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tatara specializes in psychiatric nursing, med/surg adult care.

1 Article; 102 Posts; 4,281 Profile Views

wasanursingstudent said:
Thank you for sharing a part of your life with us. I was 5 weeks into LPN clinicals and I dropped. I was enjoying it, and doing pretty well. But stress overcame me and I wasn't sleeping and I became exhausted most of the time and was not able to preform clinical skills properly. I believe this is a calling for me also, since all I can think of is going back, but it would now take too much to get caught up, so I think I will let it go for now,and wait till my name surfaces again in a yr. Would you or someone have any advice for me.. I really didnt want to quit, but exhaustion and stress got the best of me.

Seek yourself.

For a while, get out of the picture and look at things in a different perspective.

-Try to identify what motivates you, or think how you get inspired in accomplishing even the little things you do everyday.

-Love what you do. Put your 100% into it.

-Reward yourself

-Laugh, smile a lot

-Picture yourself as how you always wanted to be, choose a role model (an admirable, successful nurse whom you can get to talk and be inspired with)

-Count your blessings

-Appreciate little things that tend to get unnoticed like how a sincere thank you from a patient makes you feel inside

-Have positive and happy thoughts every after shift as you head home

-Write down or have a journal of those that you did during the day which you are unhappy about or which you could have done better given another chance

-Do not succumb into failure, instead, remind yourself that before they became somebody, they too started as nobody

-Pray

I know they are easily said than done, but just try. After all, it is always possible to have fun and enjoy clinicals as you experience the peculiar ways into which you learn.

I hope you can chase your dreams and make them a reality. God bless you.

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4 Posts; 705 Profile Views

Thank you for your kind words.I have been riddled with guilt since I dropped clinicals. All I think about 24/7 is nursing school, but for right now I have to remove myself from it. I am going to print off what you wrote and I will keep it with me.

Thank you

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tatara specializes in psychiatric nursing, med/surg adult care.

1 Article; 102 Posts; 4,281 Profile Views

wasanursingstudent said:
Thank you for your kind words.I have been riddled with guilt since I dropped clinicals. All I think about 24/7 is nursing school, but for right now I have to remove myself from it. I am going to print off what you wrote and I will keep it with me.

Thank you

❤️

Don't mention it. just come again.

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