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I’m burnt out

Nurses   (1,311 Views 21 Comments)

Newgradnurse17 has 2 years experience as a BSN.

56 Likes; 2,800 Visitors; 242 Posts

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So I’ve been an RN for nearly a year and a half and Im burnt out. 

I work on the float pool, working on different floors every day. Sometimes multiple floors a day. I do ten 8 hour shifts a fortnight. 

I’m sick of being an ‘outsider’ every where I go.

 I’m sick of not being appreciated.

im sick of being so busy that I never get a lunch break  

im sick of doing short changes (ie finishing at 2330 and being back at 0700)

I’m sick of being called in everyday, making me feel so bad that I can’t say no  

im sick of having to work 7-8-9 days in a row and only having one day off before starting back  

I feel like all my life is going to work, coming home and sleeping and then back to work. On my day off (rarely have more than 1 off in a row) I either do house work and meal prep, or sleep for 15 hours. 

I moved here for my job, and haven’t really made any friends. I’m single as well. So spend most my time on my own and have no one I can talk to about my frustration or when I’ve had a sh*ty day. 

I have a leave in a couple of months, but don’t think I can make it till then. I’m exhausted.

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evastone has 4 years experience as a BSN, RN.

20 Likes; 4,709 Visitors; 106 Posts

You sound physically and emotionally drained which I would feel too if I had your work schedule. Here's what I would do:

STOP working the float pool. Request a permanent unit to work on. It is difficult to develop a working relationship with coworkers when you are not permanently stationed there. 

STOP skipping breaks. It is wearing you down and you are not being paid extra to starve during your shifts.

STOP coming in for overtime regardless of how bad you feel. Ignore the phone calls and messages. You need to take care of YOU. Only come in if you need the money. The hospital will NOT collapse just because you won't go in for overtime. 

If you have sick days perhaps you might want to consider a couple days off as a "Mental health day" just to hold you over until your vacation. 

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Jedrnurse has 25 years experience as a BSN, RN and works as a school nurse.

472 Likes; 10,871 Visitors; 1,047 Posts

A lot of the problematic things you mention are in your power to change, at least to some degree.

Do it.

 

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bluegeegoo2 has 11 years experience as a LPN and works as a LPN.

35 Likes; 17,410 Visitors; 747 Posts

I agree with evastone, you must take care of yourself.

Your employer doesn't give a rat's *** if you're hungry, tired, stressed, etc. It's your job to tend to take care your own needs. TAKE your breaks. Go pee. Eat. Hell, go sit on the toilet just to breathe for a minute. All that noise and stress will be there when you get back. I promise. 

When they try to call you in, say no, sorry, not happening today/tomorrow. Don't give a reason. It's not their business. If they try to guilt trip, stay firm. Keep in mind that the hospital managed to run before you got there and will continue to do so in your absence. You, however, may NOT continue to run if you allow yourself to be used up. Burnout is real. Please advocate for yourself. 

By taking your scheduled time off, you will have more free time to possibly socialize more and establish some friendships or pursue hobbies.

Work/life balance is vital to mental health for most people. You are in control of that balance. The choice is yours to make. 

Best of luck! 

 

 

 

 

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Blue_Moon has 18 years experience as a BSN and works as a RN.

129 Likes; 4,574 Visitors; 374 Posts

I agree with the above and remember it's not your job to fill the holes. If you keep doing that they will never need to hire an extra hand or figure out a different way.

Also as a float nurse it is hard to fit in because you are not regularly at any one place for long. You also tend to get the worst assignments no one else on the floor wants.

Can you do 12's somewhere? If not, do NOT come in on your only 2 days off. 

I had a position once on a floor where I worked 8's either days or afternoons and was regularly forced to stay over and called in every day off, sometimes with threats I could be fired if I didn't come in so I quit answering my phone. I left there and found another place that was MUCH better so it may be time to find a different place near you all together.

Good luck!

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1,065 Likes; 7 Followers; 21,207 Visitors; 2,676 Posts

💡

The (nursing) behaviors and compromises you report go on all across the country and are the thing that perpetuates this BS.

You can't determine whether others appreciate you or not, but you can do something about skipping meals/breaks, coming in at their every beck and call, quick turn-arounds, and working multiple days in a row. Most likely you can do something about working in a float position, too.

Go to work for money. If your heart is bursting with additional desires to help people, volunteer in situations where people don't actively abuse you as part of their basic business plan.

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AnnieNP has 20 years experience as a MSN, NP and works as a Nurse Practitioner.

48 Likes; 1 Follower; 2,926 Visitors; 344 Posts

When you leave your regularly scheduled shifts, DO NOT ANSWER YOUR PHONE!!!!!!!

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217 Likes; 7,863 Visitors; 723 Posts

Everything previous posters have said.

Never feel guilty not saying yes to OT, not picking up your phone when you recognize that number and let it go straight to VM. Your NM doesn’t feel guilty, why should you?

Take those breaks; you need them to function better on all cylinders. 

I don’t go to work to feel appreciated; it’s just additional if I do. I go to work to make money.  I think a change in mindset is key; find different ways to feel appreciated (i.e volunteering).

Youll get there. (((Hugs))).

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Ruby Vee has 40 years experience as a BSN.

902 Likes; 11 Followers; 64 Articles; 168,792 Visitors; 13,721 Posts

On 1/25/2019 at 3:24 AM, Newgradnurse17 said:

So I’ve been an RN for nearly a year and a half and Im burnt out. 

I work on the float pool, working on different floors every day. Sometimes multiple floors a day. I do ten 8 hour shifts a fortnight. 

I’m sick of being an ‘outsider’ every where I go.

 I’m sick of not being appreciated.

im sick of being so busy that I never get a lunch break  

im sick of doing short changes (ie finishing at 2330 and being back at 0700)

I’m sick of being called in everyday, making me feel so bad that I can’t say no  

im sick of having to work 7-8-9 days in a row and only having one day off before starting back  

I feel like all my life is going to work, coming home and sleeping and then back to work. On my day off (rarely have more than 1 off in a row) I either do house work and meal prep, or sleep for 15 hours. 

I moved here for my job, and haven’t really made any friends. I’m single as well. So spend most my time on my own and have no one I can talk to about my frustration or when I’ve had a sh*ty day. 

I have a leave in a couple of months, but don’t think I can make it till then. I’m exhausted.

Float pool is a tough place to start.  Is there one floor that you like more than the others?  One place which is more supportive than others?  Apply for a transfer; I'm sure they'd be delighted to have an experienced float pool nurse.  If you have a nursing "home", it will be easier to get to know people on your unit, and a more friendly schedule will give you time to make plans with people.  

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Seeing Myself Out has 6 years experience.

28 Likes; 1,089 Visitors; 51 Posts

Do you rely on your job for benefits? If not I suggest getting a per diem job and quit your current job once you get the hang of it. Sometimes flexibility is much better than being married to a job especially if you don't like it. I haven't worked full time since January 2017 due to burn out, sure I lost a lot of potential income but I don't really regret it. 

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missmollie has 4 years experience as a ADN, BSN and works as a RN.

22 Likes; 13,180 Visitors; 846 Posts

You are in a unique position to know which floor or specialty you enjoy the most, and how the atmosphere on the floor is.  Perhaps now is the time to apply to a few floors that you enjoy.   Having a home floor is important to building a sense of community and it sounds as if this is something you want right now.  Start applying!

Don't answer the call if they call for overtime.  You, and you alone, make that choice to go in.  So make the choice to not go in. 

Best wishes in future endeavors!

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3ringnursing has 25 years experience as a BSN and works as a RN.

26 Likes; 1 Article; 7,984 Visitors; 535 Posts

I worked for the largest medical center in town when I was a new grad. They had a staffing office that called everyday I was off and I swear they must have had algorithms of what to say if you said no.

No ride? We'll send a cab. No childcare? We have a daycare option. Your busy? How about a later shift then. This was in the days before caller ID (before cellphones and home computers) so you had to answer the phone to know who was calling (then again none of my friends called at 5 am either). It went on all day long. Eventually I stopped answering the phone altogether. I felt bad but they certainly didn't. 

Edited by 3ringnursing

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