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I hate nursing

Nurses   (73,687 Views 272 Comments)
by Neezy84 Neezy84 (Member)

1,468 Visitors; 42 Posts

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You are reading page 12 of I hate nursing. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

lisaksemt has 12 years experience as a ADN, BSN.

1,100 Visitors; 23 Posts

Not allately nursing is the same. You could look around during for other opportunities, such as MDS coordinator, school nursing, private duty nursing. Sounds like you might be a little burned out and needing a break from nursing entirely. Indicating that nursing is who you are tells me that deep down, you enjoy nursing on some level. Take a break and perhaps check in with a therapist . . . There might be a little underlying depression too. I've hated my job at times too. 12 years is too long to be miserable. You deserve better. Best of luck to you.

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245 Visitors; 2 Posts

I felt that way when I worked for dentist. I changed professions, but if I had to guess you are about 30. Anxiety at that age is common

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To my dear colleagues who say they hate nursing, I feel for you...

However you see nursing, either as a profession, or just as a job”, it's important to know and remember at all times how emotionally demanding it is for any one practicing. I have listened to and personally witnessed more cases of burnout” than I can ever recall. Though I recently retired, at one point in my career of 40 years, (2 years as Nursing Assistant, 4 years as LPN, 34 years as RN) I was a Chief Nurse Representative for our union and represented nurses in talks with management regarding various disputes including disciplinary actions, vacation or educational leave denials, scheduling conflicts, personal disagreements and /or bullying between co-workers, managers, physicians and a whole slew of other issues from drug abuse to patient complaints and even personal appearance on the job.

One thing I always tried to do as I got to know the nurse involved, was to do some counseling. In the thousands of conversations with other nursing colleagues as well as nurses I represented, I came to see that the nurses who got along best with themselves, their co-workers and even patients, were those who learned early on that they themselves were always their most important patient. They had learned to take care of themselves first. I gained tremendous respect for my nursing colleagues who were almost universally sincere, compassionate, dedicated, and hardworking people. But there were also those who were overcome by their outside life. There were those who were in troubled personal relationships, those whose domestic responsibilities overwhelmed them and even those who consistently worked extra shifts and endless overtime, either through their need (or even greed) for the money. All of these were often the ones who were so chronically tired and fatigued that their judgment, coping skills and consequently their emotional well-being ALWAYS suffered. They had lost contact with the most basic and fundamental principle that their own health was just as important as that of the patients they were assigned. I always tried to emphasize what I had learned for myself. My clinical practice was always in critical care areas, ICU, CCU, ER, PACU and I very early on realized that although Nursing was way less physically demanding than many jobs I had had (machinist, toolmaker, landscape construction, heavy equipment operator, truck driver, auto assembly-line worker), Nursing took way more out of me emotionally than all of the other jobs put together. Interacting with dozens, perhaps even hundreds, of different people every single day, and being responsible for fulfilling needs that ranged from trivial, even petty, to urgent, emergent or right-now-critical can drain even the most resilient person, let alone someone who is tired, fatigued or distracted by their own personal problems. I had to find a way to achieve a balance in my own life between expending energy and resources on others and finding, building, and preserving them within myself. Balance, balance, balance. I can not emphasize how crucial that is for anyone within healthcare.

For me, I found balance by being physically fit through regular swimming and martial arts practice and emotionally fit by making sure that I fit in family activities that I could share with my wife and kids.

And I have heard absolutely ALL of the reasons, both from other nurses and from patients I cared for, about why people just could never find the time to be consistent with the things that benefited them. And though I tried to refrain from any sort of point by point criticism of their reasons, or preaching, I often tried to share what I learned from a friend who once told me If you search for excuses, you will find them, if you work for results, you will get them”. Practice is cumulative and progress accrues, but you have to strive for repetition…that is, consistency. Even little bits of effort add up. Fitness experts confirm that. Just like short breaks or naps can be incredibly refreshing, so can short intervals of the right types of exercise can contribute tremendously to overall fitness. And so can short periods of positive recreation benefit moods and spirit!

So to those who are saying they hate nursing”, I would just say…please give it another try, only make this try include being the best nurse you can be by treating yourself as the patient first. Ask yourself Are you doing OK today? Is there anything I can get for you? . Be as concerned about yourself as you would be about the sickest person assigned to you. You deserve good nursing care and it will help you appreciate what it can do for others and keep you prepared to provide it.

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492 Visitors; 11 Posts

You answered your own question....find another profession! If you had kids I would understand you staying in the job to support your family, but you don't. Move on, do something that makes you happy. Find Jesus

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65 Visitors; 1 Post

I'm sorry you're feeling this way, I think every nurse has hated the job at some point in their career. It sounds you like you are extremely burnt out. Perhaps taking a little time off, if you are able, and getting in some quality rest and relaxation would be a good place to start. Take some time to really evaluate and research the type of career you might be interested in, perhaps you can do something like insurance where having a nursing license is a huge benefit. Lastly, but most importantly, please seek out a therapist in your area. You need to speak with someone about the attack, get properly diagnosed, and get some treatment that will really help you. I hope everything works out for you.

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46 Visitors; 1 Post

I can see where you're coming from. Being a nurse is tough and very trying on the mind and body. I love being an LPN most days but there are still those that make me question my sanity for getting into this field. I've tried several different avenues as well. Being in LTC for 11 years has definitely taught me that I'm not suppose to be there permanently. I did however do travel nurse. A few in a LTC setting and to me it was much better. There are several different settings to work in while being a travel nurse. It's very exciting and I definitely recommend any LPN that is able, to jump on that train. I work at an office now with a plastic surgeon and I'm in love with my job again. LTC was draining my soul, especially the facility I was at. Get out there and see what you enjoy. If you still absolutely hate it, go back to school for something you love. Life is too short to be miserable. Good luck ❤

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1,199 Visitors; 23 Posts

This sounds like depression to me. Crying all the time, hating everything about your life.... Have you considered seeing a therapist or perhaps starting on anti-depressant medication (under a doctor's supervision, of course)? I can't help but think that if you felt better you would be better able to make a decision about continuing with your education, etc. Please keep on trying to get better. Best of luck to you

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2,319 Visitors; 186 Posts

On reading your post what strikes me the most is not just your statement that you hate nursing. I don't want to give the easy answer "If you don't like it, go somewhere else" That's the easy response. You sound to me that you may be depressed and perhaps have some PTSD from the attack you suffered. When you have trouble each and every day in emotionally feeling that you can handle your work, it's time to seek help. It may be that you are never going to like nursing and a change in occupation could be just what you're looking for. However, if you do want to continue in the profession, please see a counselor and work through some of these issues. It is nothing to be ashamed of

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1,857 Visitors; 34 Posts

I live in California and I have an LVN license and other absolutely love it. When I first got my license I worked at a nursing home and I loved taking care of the elderly. Now I work for Sutter hospital in urology. I make great money, I have free health care and I work one on one with my doctor. Plus I have great hours Monday thru Friday 8am to 5pm

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239 Visitors; 6 Posts

I'm sorry you are suffering so much and for so long. It sounds like total burnout and PTSD to boot. And perhaps family persuasion to make you go into the field, especially since you've hated it since the beginning. It's time to look for another job in nursing (if that's truly what you choose in your heart) and find something that's not bedside/totally different than what you have done. Your body is trying to tell you that this is not what you should be doing. Fight or flight is kicking in and you are ignoring it and overriding what your body is telling you. Overwhelming anxiety and depression with unhealthy coping behaviors shows this. It's so incredibly easy to get "stuck". But You are in a place where you have to change something for your own sanity. Before getting your RN maybe consider if it's even worth it for you. If your heart is not TRULY in this field than it seems like your adding more suffering to your plate. Nursing either isn't for you, or else you need a completely different environment to work in. Time for some soul searching about what is best for you!

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5,045 Visitors; 144 Posts

Some of these reactions are the epitome of the one thing I think is the nursing profession's worst trait! How hard is it to support someone who is in a tough spot???? What hypocrites!!

Sounds to me like you've been working at one toxic place after another. Not every place is toxic.

You do need to do some serious soul searching. Really research different nursing fields and see if there are any you have a passion for. I'm sure you've experienced some that you know for sure how you feel about them. Research other career options too.

You can still be in Healthcare without being in nursing. Have you looked at radiology, phlebotomy, ultrasonography... there are tons of different areas that don't abuse their employees or coworkers.

You're the only one who can decide what to do, but your first question needs to be "What good am I doing for myself?" Patients know when their nurse doesn't like their job, ask yourself if you're really providing the kind of care you'd want for yourself.

All of you attacking someone for being stuck... would you attack your patients for being sick?? Get off your high horses.

If nurses would stop abusing each other, we might actually be able to make needed changes to our profession.

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