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I cry after I see a baby born-can you give me some advice

Ob/Gyn   (9,834 Views 24 Comments)
by JerseyBSN JerseyBSN (New Member) New Member

JerseyBSN has 41 years experience and works as a FNP.

6,692 Visitors; 163 Posts

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You are reading page 2 of I cry after I see a baby born-can you give me some advice. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

1,556 Visitors; 56 Posts

Guy here- I actually choked up a little bit when I saw my first birth, csection, until the dr flipped the uterus up onto the moms belly and started sewing it up, "holy s__t!"

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6,868 Visitors; 376 Posts

Try looking at it this way - it happens every day, multiple times per day, so it's something "routine". Also, it is not a miracle - it is a natural biological function, and people give birth in the same way that all other mammals give birth. So just like cats, dogs, pigs, mice, squirrels, etc.

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9,577 Visitors; 453 Posts

I worked L&D. The first few times the actual birth was an emotional thing. And there were times right up until the end where I'd made such a connection with the family that my eyes would get damp at the birth. But you get used to it, mostly. You concentrate on getting the technical parts of the job done. The family is relying on you to help them. So you do. If you ever get to the place where you aren't moved at all by a birth...that would be a sad day. Yes, it's a biological function. But that doesn't mean it isn't still a moving time. You may see hundreds of births, but for your patients this is a once in a lifetime deal. That baby is only born once. I know L&D nurses that have been nurses for many many years who still stop at the end of a day and say, "wow, I helped at an amazing birth today!"

So...pontificating aside...go with it. Do your job and do it well, remember there's a difference between sympathy and empathy, but don't cut yourself off from the joy of that moment.

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NurseNora has 40 years experience and works as a LDR RN.

1 Like; 9,172 Visitors; 568 Posts

After over forty years in L&D, I still cry at some deliveries. No biggie. If you don't try so hard to fight it, the emotions you feel may not be quite so overwhelming. Just keep doing what needs to be done while you cry.

Perhaps you should warn your patient ts in advance that you often cry at a birth and that if you cry whe their baby is born, it does 't mea there is a problem, just that that is how you respond to the miracle of birth.

Keep running the pit and stimulating the baby and doing the paperwork thru the tears. And keep a Kleenex or two handy.

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Zaphod has 4 years experience and works as a SRNA.

5,764 Visitors; 181 Posts

At least you didn't pass out..ahem.not so proud but I was out as soon as I saw the placenta..now coding open chest blood everywhere is somehow ok with me..I think with time you will not get so emotional however I do hope you never see this as a routine event..you have a good heart.

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7,510 Visitors; 862 Posts

I sometimes still tear up at nice births. Especially if I know my patient well. Especially when I was pregnant.

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908 Visitors; 4 Posts

Maybe you should consider getting your hormone level checked. Its possible a low dose hormone birth control would help. You sound like me when I was pregnant. Just an idea;)

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1,631 Visitors; 53 Posts

I can say a bit from the mother's perspective. After I gave birth to my first daughter I was marveling over her cooing at her and telling her how much I loved her. There was a student nurse there that basically said, "aw shucks you're going to make ME cry!" and she did tear up too watching us together. Later she came back and told me that it was her first OB rotation and that she would always remember us. I was touched and thought it was sweet that the experience had meant so much to her and that she was able to share in our joy and connect with us. However if she had really been balling I think it would have been distracting and uncomfortable. It would have taken away from my experience and I would have wondered what was wrong with my nurse.

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NeoPediRN has 6 years experience and works as a RN.

17,073 Visitors; 945 Posts

That's so funny, my coworkers and I just had this EXACT conversation! It's normal. I cry, they cry, we all get teary. It dissipates with time. Enjoy being able to feel these emotions while you can, nursing has a way of sucking the life out of you. :)

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5 Likes; 3 Followers; 17 Articles; 65,644 Visitors; 5,259 Posts

The first several births I saw, I cried....a lot. There are still some moments at work that make me get misty-eyed in a good way. There's a good way to do it - with a couple Kleenex and staying in control - and a not-so-good way, which means breaking down into hysterics, becoming a blithering mess, and being unable to take competent care of your patients.

The miracle of it will hopefully never wear off, but in time know that you will get better at managing the emotional aspect. Good luck to you! :)

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OBRN4U has 12 years experience and works as a Registered Nurse, BSN.

1,659 Visitors; 26 Posts

This means you have compassion! It also means that you may be getting yourself too involved with your patients. I cry, sometimes, even after 10 years and 400+ deliveries! This feeling may go away, alittle, after you are off orientation. Then, you won't have time to concentrate on crying because, you will be so busy trying to stay on top of your charting while providing excellent bedside support to the pt and her family. :0)

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PinkNBlue has 10 years experience and works as a Registered Nurse.

8,635 Visitors; 415 Posts

I've cried at every birth I've seen... it's truly a miracle and most of the time, it's an exciting and life changing time for the family and you have been a part of it. I agree with the poster that said if you ever stop feeling like this is a miracle and don't at least get goosebumps or a feeling of pure euphoria for the families, that would be a sad day.

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