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I can do your job, you can't do mine.

CNA/MA   (4,579 Views 19 Comments)
by crobson221 crobson221 (New Member) New Member

370 Visitors; 2 Posts

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You are reading page 2 of I can do your job, you can't do mine.. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

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This sounds like a proud war story. First 10-15 years ago, chemical restraints were far easier to get away with, double that time and lobotomies were the cure for dementia, it's not fair to compare times of the past. Pt's are bigger, regulations are stricter and patient rights are booming with litigation.

As a CNA, I would hope you find a lovelier job, I don't see facilities in this model standing the test of time. It really feels like your building and equipment is outdated +30 years, which goes to show an outdated combative mindset of nursing (nursing careers historically began during the civil war). First, don't bother with a 2 assist if your not getting hands, the best CNA's care for themselves, your ass is not on the line, the facility is.

But I honestly don't take anything bad away from what the nurse said. Truth hurts. Leaving my nurses at shifts end while they put in overtime hurts, sitting waiting for call lights as they chart for hours hurts. My job is to assist and sometimes I wish we could help ease the RN/LVN workload (paper pushing). But I can't. Respecting the fact that her job has a higher education and hourly workload will go farther than saying she's a bad nurse. Our pride as CNA's comes with our exorbitant effort in face to face, personal care with patients, more than doctors, PT's, OT's, dentists, nurses and the like, LTC CNA's are hands on with their patients. Being that goes a long way.

My only advice is DO NOT HURT YOURSELF. No patient is worth you, because you care for 60 people. If pts to heavy, give the nurse a heads up and be patient, play it off as no big deal. Just don't hurt yourself.

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OrganizedChaos has 10 years experience as a LVN and specializes in M/S, LTC, Corrections, PDN & drug rehab.

1 Follower; 1 Article; 64,212 Visitors; 6,876 Posts

If the nurse is not on a med pass, wound treatment or on the phone with a dr they need to help! Don't they care about the residents? 26:1 is impossible for a CNA. I would report to the state.

I'm not agreeing with nurses but some things other than med pass, wound care or being on the phone might keep a nurse busy.

Report it & have what happen? I'm sure the state is aware of those numbers. It's unbearable, yes, but it's a reality in nursing. Especially LTC.

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Yuppers21 has 4 years experience and specializes in Med/Surg, ICU.

5,320 Visitors; 173 Posts

The nurse's comment is true and a valid point IF s/he is currently busy with a task that is delegated to nursing only. It is not an excuse to get out of helping the aides with patient care. I worked as a PCT for a short time before becoming a nurse so I am familiar with the struggles of both roles, though not in LTC. The next time you are in a situation where you need the nurse's help, try framing your request in a direct and polite way that does not make it easy to get out of the task. For example, next time you need to get a 2-assist patient up, try approaching the nurse with "The pt in 204 needs to get up to the commode and is a 2 person assist. When will you be available to assist me with her transfer?" This does not allow a "yes" or "no" answer. If the nurse responds with a "you can't do my job" answer, reply with "I understand you are busy. I am the only CNA here tonight and I must have another person help me with this transfer. When can I tell her that we will be available to help her up to the commode?" If the nurse is still resisting (without a valid excuse) calmly explain that both you as the CNA and she as the nurse are responsible for her care and right now is in need of both. If the nurse refuses to offer a solution, gently but firmly inform her that you will have to notify your supervisor/manager/DON that you are unable to complete necessary patient care due to the inability of staff to assist you and then follow through with it. Don't just use it as a tactic to "bully" staff into helping, actually notify someone (in writing)of the problem. It truly is putting the responsibility back on the facility to provide their residents with all the resources needed to give adequate patient care. Whether that means hiring more CNAs or retraining of nursing staff to help one another is up to them.

By the way, you are not paid nearly well enough to be expected to "manage up" your senior staff in this way, but since you won't leave and want to be loyal to the facility and other coworkers, this is the only way you can do that without sacrificing patient safety AND protect yourself.

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Paws2people has 13 years experience.

14,597 Visitors; 495 Posts

You sound like the kind of CNA I always loved working with. I am sorry that you are having these issues, and that you aren't getting any support from tee nurses you work with. I would go to your DON and explain, calmly and objectively, the problems you're having. Remember, staffing is the facility's responsibility. Maybe if they realize that a hard working, valuable employee is at her wits end, they might make some intervention. I know you don't want to leave, but remember this: as much loyalty as you feel for your facility, I guarantee that it is not reciprocated. I'm not talking about your coworkers, I mean the administration that's forcing the staff to work short constantly without support.

I wish you the best, and I really hope things get better. Soon.

Exactly. It is not reciprocated. If you were to get hurt or quit, they would replace you. Would your replacement be as good as you? Odds are no. Would administration care? Odds are, NO.

Maybe you should of told that nurse, "You're correct. I can't do your job. I cannot do what you are doing... I would feel bad sitting here eating Doritos while my patients needed HELP." After all, it's not you the CNA who needs help, it's the patients who need help.

Edited by Paws2people

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Paws2people has 13 years experience.

14,597 Visitors; 495 Posts

I have NEVER refused to help a CNA/Aide. I have helped the front desk and Hhousekeeping at times. It's is very rare that I am not already running around as you described, but when able, I believe we all should help one another. I have seen RN'S not even help each other at times. One nurse running around like a chicken with her head cut off while 2or 3 sit at the nursing station chatting away or on the internet. I offer to help when I see someone very busy. It is a sad statement of our times. I don't remember it being this way in years past, and I don't understand why it happens. Lazy is one thing, but if they care about the patients, let alone their co-workers, why not help? I am so sorry you are treated this way. NO EXCUSE FOR THIS!

One nurse running around while others sit and chat or are on the Internet?

I think we work together. Lol. Sadly, this is TOO common, and you as a helpful, diligent nurse, are in the minority.

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nursejoy1 has 22 years experience as a ASN, RN and specializes in Geriatrics.

1 Article; 6,228 Visitors; 213 Posts

I will agree with one thing the nurse said, she can do your job, you can't do hers. But to me, that means something different. It means she does know how to do your job and should get off of her butt and help you do it. I have seen way too many nurses act like they didn't know how to do something to get out of helping a CNA. To me that is absolutely ridiculous. I have been a CNA, an LPN and now an RN and there has never been a time, and never will be when I say no to a CNA simply because I don't want to. If I am in the middle of a task that has to be done at this moment, then I will say, I'm sorry, let me finish this and I will help you. But just say no, never gonna happen. Sounds like you are an awesome CNA and I would be honored to work with one such as yourself. And help you out when you needed it.

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Pca_85revived has 14 years experience as a LPN and specializes in CNA 8 yrs LPN 6 geri, chemical dependency.

2,070 Visitors; 60 Posts

So, you're working in an understaffed environment you feel is unsafe. You feel a loyalty to them and are looking for alternatives to quitting? Tell them just that. Not the nurses who won't help, the nurse manager who shrugged his shoulders like a puppy confronted about pooping on the new carpet. Someone who actually cares about employee retention and safe care. If there's no one like that in your building, I really would quit at that point.

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